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2022 Fall - *ALL
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Subj Cat# Class# Sect Units Mod Course Faculty Day Time Location Instruction Mode Note Description

AGS
300 1086 1 4   Applied Feminist Applications
TextbookTextbook
Linda Perkins Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Applied Gender Studies 300 is a course designed to incorporate contemporary practices with activist-based perspectives. This course presents an overview of domestic and global feminism through the examination of advocacy, nonprofit organizations, and community service utilizing the perspectives from a variety of sources.

AGS
400M 1087 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

ARCH
310 1088 1 4   Introduction to Archival Studies
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Gabriele Carey This course introduces students to archival theory and practice, covering a variety of issues and principles related to professional work with archives, records, and special collections. It will introduce students to fundamental archival skills and methods. Specific topics will include accessioning and appraisals, arrangement and description, preservation, security, archives users, and ethics and standards. Students will also get a chance to work with original materials and do some hands-on work in archival processing at Special Collections, Honnold/Mudd Library. ARCH 310 counts as a Research methods course.

ARMGT
300 1198 1 4   Arts Organization Dynamics
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty 10:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined Hybrid Blended Instructor: TBD. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Class meets at CGU and various locations. Meeting dates/locations TBD. Department consent required. See department for details. This survey course explores the theories, processes, and practices behind operations of nonprofit arts organizations today. Practical applications will focus on developing skills to manage arts organizations. Topics covered will be working with boards, human resources, facilities, and program development, including arts education and community engagement, and may change topically. Guest speakers who are leaders in the field will add diverse perspectives. Focus on specifics types of arts organizations will depend upon the interests of the students in the course. In teams, students will create each component of a new organization from mission statement to the final presentation that includes all aspects of the organization. Students individually will also select an arts organization, similar in some way(s) to the virtual organization that they will develop during the semester. Through conversations with this organization's staff they will research how course issues play out in this institution.

ARMGT
301 1195 1 4   Legal Foundations for the Arts
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Sarah Odenkirk. Class meets at The Wallis. See department for meeting location details. Department consent required. Beginning with a brief history of the United States' legal system, we will trace the evolution of laws that affect creative expression and business ventures. We will explore the differences amongst protections available for intellectual properties; examine the construction and application of contracts; and distinguish the various business models available to creative entrepreneurial endeavors. Our study and discussion will also include coverage of Autheticity and Title, First Amendment issues and Artists' Rights. Students will engage in hands-on exercises like developing mission and vision statements for creative organizations and negotiating art world deals. Classes may also include presentations from guest speakers addressing how the law affects specific roles and concerns of artists, dealers, collectors, curators and/or auctioneers. Active participation is required from all students.

ARMGT
310A 1196 1 2 M1 Fundraising I
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 3:40PM -
5:30PM
No Room Needed Hybrid Blended Instructor: Robin Sukhadia. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Class meets at PCM; see department for meeting location. Department consent required. Principles and Practices of Fundraising (310A) introduces students to the fundamentals of philanthropy and fundraising in the arts. The course presents critical concepts and pragmatic applications for raising funds for the visual and performing arts across different genres, settings, and scales. Informative reading, case study review, critical discussions, written assignments, and guest speakers will immerse students in the key ideas, pragmatic tools, and core relationships needed for successful fundraising in the arts. Students will become familiar with comprehensive fundraising planning, cultivation, solicitation, and stewardship using old and new technologies. Participation in this course will prepare students to enhance the impact of the arts on our lives and communities through thoughtful planning and action.

ARMGT
310B 1197 1 2 M2 Fundraising II
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 3:40PM -
5:30PM
No Room Needed Hybrid Blended Instructor: Robin Sukhadia. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Class meets at PCM; see department for meeting location. (Pre-requisite ArtBus/Artmgt 310A) Fundraising has become a key responsibility of qualified leaders in the arts. In this pragmatic and critical course students will study cutting edge trends in development, form a leadership vision for arts fundraising, and practice core development competencies that prepare them to raise funds for visual and performing arts organizations across genre, scale, and setting. Course readings, case studies, critical discussions, written assignments, and guest speakers will deepen students’ understanding of key ideas, historical foundations, and catalytic changes shaping philanthropy today. Building from the comprehensive fundraising plans developed in 310A, students will gain hands-on experience in cultivation, solicitation, and stewardship — from prospect research to proposal development, reporting to evaluation, and analogue to online relationship building. Students will deepen their understanding of how fundraising can enhance the impact of the arts on our lives and communities.

ARMGT
316 1193 1 2 M2 Public Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Fri 10:00AM -
12:50PM
Off campus location In-Person Instructor: Susan Gray. Class meets in W. Hollywood; see department for meeting location. This is an intensive course providing an opportunity for students to learn about contemporary and culturally relevant approaches to public art in the urban environment. Students are instructed in practical methodologies and will learn about regulatory, budgetary, legal, maintenance, conservation, and community considerations informing this area of practice. Classes will explore case studies and best practices with regards to policy, planning, artist and site selection, collaboration, contracting, fabrication and installation. Lessons are conducted in classroom, workshops with practitioners, and field trips to see permanent and temporary artworks in situ.

ARMGT
321 1386 1 2 M2 Arts Marketing & Communications
TextbookTextbook
Katherine Carrido Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Arts Marketing & Communications surveys marketing, communications, and digital strategies that can be applied in the arts sector. Students will learn basic principles, tools and techniques that will help them create integrated and effective marketing, communications and PR campaigns. The course introduces key marketing concepts, theories and practical applications through an analysis of relevant case studies, readings, lectures and discussions, teaching students to think strategically and proactively about marketing problems.

ARMGT
353 1194 1 2 M1 Strategic Planning in the Arts
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Fri 10:00AM -
12:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: John E. McGuirk Strategic planning is the process of defining an organization's mission and goals and allocating the resources necessary to achieve them over time. Smart, savvy planning has become critical for success within the rapidly changing environment for not-for-profit arts and culture organizations. In this course, Arts Management students will examine multiple approaches to developing and implementing a strategic plan. Students will also learn and apply methods and frameworks for critical reasoning, complex problem-solving and oral and written communication. Coupled with a foundation in the strategic planning process, these core strategic thinking skills will help students design effective solutions to strategic challenges by asking the right questions, first. The course will include lectures, case studies, group discussions, and hands-on experiential activities. The course format is practice-based, with a focus on learning by doing. We will therefore directly apply the approaches and frameworks we learn, often to a case or mini-project. Note that this course is team taught, with some sessions led by one of the two instructors but an integrated structure that applies all concepts and frameworks taught in the course in each assignment and course session.

ARMGT
366 1199 1 2 M1 On Site: Producing the Arts Event
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 10:00AM -
12:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Negin Singh. Class meets at CGU and various locations. Meeting dates/locations TBD. See department for details. Every arts organization, from museums and dance companies to theaters and concert halls, produce and present events. Whether you are presenting an elegant evening of chamber music, mounting a full-scale production of Hamilton, producing an annual fundraising benefit with headliner Billie Eilish, or spearheading a multi-venue arts festival, your responsibility, as an organization, is to fulfill your mission; generate and build pride and loyalty among your constituents; and ultimately leverage earned and contributed income for your organization. This course will take graduate students through the anatomy of successful arts events, performances and festivals; explore thoroughly the context and environment in which they are taking place; discuss key marketing and positioning tactics to raise institutional visibility; and explore strategic measures to attract significant earned and contributed revenue. Special consideration will be given to the unique environment in which all arts organizations are operating right now, including the Covid-19 pandemic. The course will be driven by actual Case Studies; active student participation and discussion; and practical application via project development.

ARMGT
400M 1373 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

ARMGT
401B 1200 1 4   Arts Management Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Leticia R Buckley Tue 10:00AM -
11:50AM
No Room Needed Hybrid Blended Class meets at La Plaza de la Cultura y Artes. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Department consent required. See department for details. (Pre-requisite: Course #401A) Successful completion of this course prepares students to fulfill the practicum thesis option for the master’s degree in Arts Management. Building on the plan of applied study defined in course 401A, students implement and complete an arts management project serving an arts organization, collective, or network. Students work individually, or in teams, to fulfill a contract for services, conduct a project, create a deliverable for a client, and compose a final report. Participants will gain expertise in how arts organizations work, expand their social networks in the arts and culture, and grow as creative thinkers and qualified arts management practitioners.

ART
301 1019 1 1 - 3   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Rachel Lachowicz Tue 10:00AM -
3:50PM
Studios In-Person Tue 10am-4pm & Wed 1-2pm. See department for meeting details. Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with core faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
301 1020 2 1 - 3   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Tue 9:30AM -
12:00PM
Studios In-Person Tue 9:30am-12pm & Tue 4-5pm. See department for meeting details. Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with core faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1021 1 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 1:00PM -
5:50PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Carmine Iannaccone Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1022 2 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 12:00PM -
5:30PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Julian Hoeber Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1023 3 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 9:00AM -
2:30PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Michael Reafsnyder Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1024 4 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 10:00AM -
3:30PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Iva Gueorguieva Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1025 5 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 9:00AM -
2:30PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Jasmine Baetz Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1383 6 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 9:00AM -
2:00PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Heidi Schwegler Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1401 7 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Fri 10:00AM -
2:50PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Amy Santoferraro Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
328 1026 1 3   Spatial Engagement & Aesthetic Meaning - Installation, A Multi-Perspective Dialogue w/Art & Space.
TextbookTextbook
Rachel Lachowicz Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Installation Art now exhibits in a multitude of modalities, be it: Relational Aesthetics, Public Practice, Social Justice, Spoken Word, National and International Art Fairs, Museum and Gallery exhibitions, and art events. From the cave paintings of early peoples to present day, Installation Art holds a challenging array of headings, sub-categories, and/or alternate terms, depending upon the type of experience, methodology and theoretical stance. Spatial Engagement and Aesthetic Meaning (Installation, A Multi-Perspective Dialogue with Art and Surrounding Space) is primarily a critique course, covering different forms of aesthetic production. The Claremont Graduate University Art Department has many outstanding exhibition spaces, both indoor and outdoor, all of which will be used for this course. Each student will be responsible for a minimum of two installations and or projects as well as participate in a final group exhibition. This is a fast-paced, upbeat course geared toward the production of meaning in art. It is designed to augment or jumpstart whatever one is at work with or in the practice of. This is an innovative and participatory safe space for creative endeavors. Methods The majority of class time will be devoted to critique. Each week the class will look at approximately three installations and discuss the required readings along with historical references.

ART
344A 1027 1 4   Ideas in Contemporary Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Carmine Iannaccone "The Grand Tour". Many commentators believe that what has been called the Golden Age of critical theory is now over. They're probably right, but just because it's over, doesn't mean it's finished. Anything as far-reaching as the body of thought that is also known as "Continental Theory" will permanently bend the light through which all successive history is viewed, to one degree or another. These theories were influential not just because they got written, but also because of how they were interpreted, discussed, unloaded and applied by legions of others in a process that (for better or for worse) is certainly still underway. And that may make it crucial to understand the theories now more than ever. The process of exegesis can become vapid and attenuate the original ideas, to the point where we forget what made them revolutionary in the first place. As more and more people talk about them, the key terms become markers of fashion rather than insight. Anyone can now throw around the word "deconstruction" and sound very informed, hip, and up-to-date without needing to know what deconstruction means. That's a problem.

ART
349 1028 1 4   Survey of Contemporary Art
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person "The Great Wheel of Art: Art in the United States and Europe, 1957-74". This class introduces students to some of the most influential art made in California, New York, and Europe from just before the beginning of the 1960s to just after. It examines the transatlantic and transcontinental dialogues that emerged among artists before globalism transformed the art-world into what is now: a multinational, corporate-style enterprise that combines aspects of the entertainment industry, the education business, and naked commercial speculation.

ART
395 1029 1 2   Written Statement Seminar
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This course is a workshop in which each participant produces a statement that explains your artistic goals, locates your practice in a social context, outlines the history out of which your work emerges, describes the conversation your art aims to be a part of, and defends, philosophically, your position.

ART
396 1030 1 3 - 15   MFA Project
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Tue 10:00AM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed In-Person Thesis defense with the three members of your MFA committee.

ART
396 1031 2 3 - 15   MFA Project
TextbookTextbook
Rachel Lachowicz 10:00AM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed In-Person Thesis defense with the three members of your MFA committee.

BOT
303A 1073 1 2   Advanced Botanical & Evolutionary Research: Intro to RSABG & CUC
TextbookTextbook
Lucinda McDade  -
RSABG Seminar Room In-Person Schedule TBD This course provides an introduction to the RSABG/CGU graduate program in Botany. Items to be covered in this course are: -Insight into the goals and expectations that the program and the faculty have for each student -Explanation of our philosophical approach to plant comparative biology and the curriculum that has been developed, emphasizing common themes and information reinforcement. [What do we expect you to know when you graduate?] -Session with each faculty member on his/her research interests, scientific approach to life, etc. -Laboratory skills and safety -Introduction to some of the important technical skills necessary for success in the program in Botany and a career in research. -Data management and maintenance of a database -Botanical collections: permit acquisition, note keeping, label preparation, specimen mounting, specimen handling; curatorial skills? -General aspects of field work, including preparation for the field (data acquisition (sleuthing), mapping, field equipment, etc.), in the field techniques (what to collect, how to collect-field press? silica gel? liquid nitrogen? FPA?; photographs; 4-wheel driving; etc.) -Introduction to the writing skills vital for success in the program in Botany and a career in research. -The importance of, and guidelines for, successful grant writing -The importance of, and guidelines for, successful manuscript preparation and submission. -The importance of oral presentations and in particular, PowerPoint preparation and presentation

BOT
400M 1379 1 0   Continuous Registration (MS Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

BOT
401 1074 1 1   Seminar Series
TextbookTextbook
Lucinda McDade  -
RSABG Seminar Room In-Person Schedule TBD Students enrich their educational program by actively participating in a semester-long series of seminars presented by outstanding visiting researchers. Students are directly involved in the development of the series by inviting speakers whose research and areas of expertise parallel individual student interests. Students serve as hosts for their invited speakers, coordinating visit details with appropriate Botany program staff, students, and faculty. Students also evaluate each seminar presentation in terms of the quality of the research presented and the quality of the style of the presentation. These evaluations are discussed by all participants in several class meetings over the course of the semester.

BOT
411 1075 1 1   Special Topics in Plant Systematics: Botanical Nomenclature
TextbookTextbook
Travis Columbus  -
RSABG Seminar Room In-Person Schedule TBD Taxonomy and nomenclature are distinct in that the former deals with the delimitation of taxa whereas the latter involves how taxa are named. Students will read and discuss the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi, and Plants, investigate the nomenclatural history of plant groups of interest, and solve nomenclatural problems.

BOT
412 1076 1 1   Special Topics in Plant Systematics: Readings in Phylogenetics
TextbookTextbook
Travis Columbus  -
RSABG Seminar Room In-Person Schedule TBD Review and discussion of phylogenetics based on the current literature.

BOT
413 1077 1 3   Special Topics in Biological Conservation: Rare Plant Conservation Plans
TextbookTextbook
Naomi Fraga  -
RSABG Seminar Room In-Person Schedule TBD Students will learn to produce plant conservation plans that include assessment of known occurrences, evaluation of conservation status and needs, and advice for landowners and regulatory agencies charged with managing natural resources. Each student will choose a regionally rare California native plant and for which little or no information has yet been assembled. It is anticipated that some plans will be published in the Occasional Publications series of Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden.

BOT
499 1380 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

CGH
300 1284 1 4   Theoretical Foundations in Health Promotion & Education
TextbookTextbook
Alan Stacy Thu 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of required online asynchronous instruction. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the theoretical issues and current methodologies related to understanding and influencing health behavior change in diverse populations. The course will focus on the social and behavioral determinants of health on the individual, interpersonal, community, institutional and policy levels. The course features guest appearances by representatives from community-based organizations who relate course material to current challenges in public health practice.

CGH
300C 1285 1 4   Theoretical Foundations in Health Promotion & Education
TextbookTextbook
Alan Stacy Thu 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of required online asynchronous instruction. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the theoretical issues and current methodologies related to understanding and influencing health behavior change in diverse populations. The course will focus on the social and behavioral determinants of health on the individual, interpersonal, community, institutional and policy levels. The course features guest appearances by representatives from community-based organizations who relate course material to current challenges in public health practice. Course registration limited to students in the Certificate in Foundations of Public Health program.

CGH
301 1286 1 4   Biostatistics
TextbookTextbook
Yusuke Shono Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Students are trained in the most commonly used statistical methods in clinical and experimental research. Students learn to select the most appropriate data analytic methods; how to apply these methods to actual data; and how to read and interpret computer output from commonly used statistical packages. In addition, the students learn to read, critique and interpret statistical concepts in the health science literature.

CGH
301C 1287 1 4   Biostatistics
TextbookTextbook
Yusuke Shono Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Students are trained in the most commonly used statistical methods in clinical and experimental research. Students learn to select the most appropriate data analytic methods; how to apply these methods to actual data; and how to read and interpret computer output from commonly used statistical packages. In addition, the students learn to read, critique and interpret statistical concepts in the health science literature. Course registration limited to students in the Certificate in Foundations of Public Health program.

CGH
302 1318 1 4   Epidemiology
TextbookTextbook
Rachaline Elizabeth Napier Tue 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class meets 2 hours weekly with 1 additional asynchronous hour of instruction. This course provides an overview of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations. Students are provided with the skills and knowledge to investigate the epidemiology of a specific disease or other health-related phenomenon and to critically evaluate population-based research studies designed to test health-related hypotheses

CGH
302C 1319 1 4   Epidemiology
TextbookTextbook
Rachaline Elizabeth Napier Tue 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class meets 2 hours weekly with 1 additional asynchronous hour of instruction. This course provides an overview of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations. Students are provided with the skills and knowledge to investigate the epidemiology of a specific disease or other health-related phenomenon and to critically evaluate population-based research studies designed to test health-related hypotheses. Course registration limited to students in the Certificate in Foundations of Public Health program.

CGH
306 1288 1 4   Supervised Field Training in Public Health
TextbookTextbook
Darleen Peterson  -
No Room Needed Supervision Independent meetings between instructor and student. Instructor consent required. The goal of the supervised field training course is to enrich students' educational training in public health by providing an opportunity to apply theory and skills acquired from their concentration to community based research and service in a practice setting. Students contribute to an agency's resources and to the solution of public health problems while developing personal confidence and leadership as a public health professional.

CGH
307 1289 1 0 - 2   Public Health Capstone
TextbookTextbook
Jamie Felicitas-Perkins  -
No Room Needed Supervision Independent meetings between instructor and student. Instructor consent required. The Public Health Capstone is the culminating experience for the MPH degree. Through this experience, students must demonstrate proficiency with public health core and track specific competencies. Student portfolios can be used to determine whether program student learning competencies have been met. Working with advisement from the Program Director, students will collect evidence of work in their courses and practice opportunities that have enabled them to master program competencies. Also documented are program experiences outside the classroom, including formal employment in public health, leadership skills (i.e. professional presentations, publications, professional conference attendance, professional association membership, leadership positions, and civic engagement) and a reflection of diversity and cultural competence within their role as a practitioner. Students will also prepare a scholarly paper based on requirements for their concentration.

CGH
308 1290 1 4   Foundations in Program Planning
TextbookTextbook
Kim Reynolds Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This course introduces the core concepts, values, and methods of public health program planning and evaluation. Students develop skills for assessing community needs for health promotion; preparing written measurable health promotion program objectives with associated methods for achieving those objectives; designing health promotion program action plans that include implementation schemes; and evaluation strategies for measuring health program process, impact, and outcome effectiveness. Students apply their knowledge of health promotion theories to effectively to plan, implement, and evaluate health promotion and communication programs.

CGH
309 1316 1 4   Monitoring & Evaluation of Global Public Health Programs
TextbookTextbook
Bree Hemingway Fri 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class meets 2 hours weekly with 1 additional asynchronous hour of instruction. This course introduces students to the language and theory of program evaluation to undertake their own evaluation, including how to pose evaluation research questions, data collection methodologies and appropriate methods for various evaluation objectives, and various evaluation designs.

CGH
310 1312 1 4   Foundations of Global Health: A Transdisciplinary Approach
TextbookTextbook
Paula Palmer Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of required online asynchronous instruction. This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to understanding key public health challenges that transcend local and national boundaries and require collaborative solutions. Threats to the health security and well being of communities in the U.S. and abroad are extensive ranging from natural and technical disasters to environmental degradation, poverty and health disparities, and emerging and non-communicable disease. Topics that impact health outcomes, including globalization and climate change, over- and under nutrition, substance use, accidents and injuries, disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies, poor reproductive and maternal child health practices, and cultural influences will be addressed from a multi-sectoral perspective. Innovative solutions to public health problems, including use of technology, micro credit, public-private collaboration, and community and grassroots activities will be highlighted. The course will utilize interactive, participatory learning methods, including in-depth cases studies, class debates, and a field study project to provide maximum opportunity to develop problem-solving strategies for public health application.

CGH
314 1320 1 4   Emerging Chronic & Infectious Diseases Worldwide
TextbookTextbook
Jessica Noelle Clague Dehart Tue 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of required online asynchronous instruction. This course provides an overview of the causative factors and demographic distribution of the major chronic diseases and infectious in the world. Epidemiologic concepts, methods and research design are emphasized. Necessary tools for applying epidemiologic approaches to chronic disease prevention are provided. The course will also cover topics in microbiology, immunology, laboratory diagnosis, outbreak investigation, infectious disease diagnosis and control in populations and very basic analytic methods. It provides students with exposure to local public health department experts in various important contemporary topics such as vector control, emerging infections and bioterrorism.

CGH
316 1326 1 4   Public Health Leadership
TextbookTextbook
Jay Orr, Rachaline Elizabeth Napier Tue 2:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined Web-Online Blended Class meets 2 hours weekly with 1 additional asynchronous hour of instruction. This course focuses on the knowledge, skills and practical tools needed to direct organizations to successful implementation of institutional vision and overall strategy. It is organized into six major Modules –future-focused leadership, leading public health systems, formulating strategy, leading and managing change, developing public health organizations, and implementing strategy. Each module offers an applied training opportunity to gain advanced knowledge to build executive and managerial skills lead and enhance health systems performance.

CGH
317 1311 1 4   Ethics, Human Rights & Cultural Diversity
TextbookTextbook
Paula Palmer Thu 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of required online asynchronous instruction. This course explores ethical principles in the distribution of health resources, the conduct of global public health research and the implementation of public health initiatives and practices across different nations, cultures and religions, as well as differences in the concepts of right and wrong. Specific areas that are explored include the role of national and international Institutional Review Boards, research integrity, the ethics of health as a political entitlement, state obligation, or a commercial commodity, the right to health, the ethical challenges of institutionalizing world wide western concepts of informed consent procedures and confidentiality while at the same time seeking to advance scientific discovery and promote universal public health justice for the poor and disadvantaged.

CGH
320 1315 1 4   Campaigning and Community Organizing for Public Health
TextbookTextbook
Bree Hemingway Tue 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class meets 2 hours weekly with 1 additional asynchronous hour of instruction. This course introduces students to a key area of knowledge in public health practice: the principles and methods of community organizing and campaigning for policy and structural change. Students learn how to mobilize the right people at the right time, with the right demands, to change public policies to promote health. Complements other courses in the school that look at advocating within policy processes or by using the mass media by placing these strategies in the context of the practical daily work and thinking of people who plan and carry out policy change campaigns at grassroots and grasstop levels.

CGH
349F 1314 1 4   US Health Policy
TextbookTextbook
Rachaline Elizabeth Napier Fri 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class meets 2 hours weekly with 1 additional asynchronous hour of instruction. Do you ever wonder why despite being the wealthiest country in the world, Americans are sicker and in poorer health on average than elsewhere? Or why our health care and pharmaceutical costs are higher? Or why there are disparities in health by income, race and ethnicity? Do you wonder why legislators in California and Vermont have proposed the adoption of universal insurance through a single payor system? How about what we can do to improve the situation and what the tradeoffs are? Do you wonder what the future portends for students as they enter the workforce and must face their own health choices? This class will tackle these questions by studying our country’s health policy choices, those of other countries, and what we can do to improve health in communities and for individuals. And, we will stay up-to date with proposed changes in health policy in Washington. To understand health policy we will ensure an understanding of topics which underpin all of current policies including the socio economics determinants of health, the costs of care, paying for care, health disparities, how patients should be treated including collaboration and integration of care, access to care, our health workforce. The class will feature several very well-known and prominent guest speakers including physicians, hospital executives and others who will share their views of health policy issues and meet the members of class.

CGH
387 1292 1 1 - 4   Applied Field Experience in a Multidisciplinary Public Health Intervention
TextbookTextbook
Carl Johnson, . Faculty  -
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructors: C. Andy Johnson & Javad Fadardi. Meeting day/time TBD. See department for details Students enrolled in this course will gain hands-on experience in a unique Public Health Intervention through the School of Community and Global Health at Claremont Graduate University. A multidisciplinary approach (Public Health, Psychology, Neurocognitive Science, and Systems Engineering will be utilized in this course to inform fieldwork done by students. Students will be trained in cognitive behavioral psychoeducational techniques to work with adolescents in relationship development. Students can expect to work with a population of middle and high school youth undergoing emotional and/or social challenges. More information will be provided to potential students during initial interviews. Personal transportation is required. Prerequisite: Undergraduate 5C students only

CGH
400 1293 1 4   Advanced Theoretical Foundations in Health Education & Promotion
TextbookTextbook
Kim Reynolds Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Class includes an hour of required online asynchronous instruction. This course provides detailed coverage of theories in Health Promotion Sciences and expands on the exploration and evaluation of the theories of social and behaviors influences introduced in CGH 300. The course also introduced and evaluates theories on the influence of the built environment, social and implicit cognition, self-determination theory and theories of social influence. An emphasis will be placed on the critical examination of theories, the degree to which they explain variance in human behavior, and ways in which novel theories can be developed and tested in an effort to enhance the prediction of health behavior.

CGH
400M 1294 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

CGH
401B 1296 1 4   Advanced Statistical Methods II
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Bin Xie Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Students should contact instructor if they are unable to attend on-campus class sessions. This course is designed for graduate students in public health to learn structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis frequently utilized in behavioral science research. Specific techniques cover advanced topics in latent variables, path analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, single- and multiple-group structural equation models, and latent growth curve models. Prerequisite: CGH 301, 401a

CGH
402 1321 1 4   Advanced Research Methods
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Jessica Noelle Clague Dehart Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of required online asynchronous instruction. This course will provide students with a theoretical and practical introduction to advanced topics in research methodology. Topics to be covered include multilevel and longitudinal experimental designs, mediation and moderation models, sampling, program development, measurement and psychometrics, analysis with missing data, recruitment and retention, effect sizes and power analysis, and preparation of a research grant proposal with an emphasis on the approach (research design) section.

CGH
407C 1297 1 0   Advanced Integrative Practicum in Public Health (Project)
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Jamie Felicitas-Perkins  -
No Room Needed Supervision Independent meetings between instructor and student. Instructor consent required. The advanced integrative practicum in public health is comprised of three incremental practice experiences engaging students in health system leadership and management and complementing the DrPH didactic curriculum. The integrative practicum begins with an introduction to the health system, continues with interactive instruction from experts in public health, and culminates in a high-level practice-based project. This course is the third in the series of three experiences. Through placement with an external entity, students synthesize, integrate and apply the skills, knowledge and training to develop and complete a significant project that is meaningful for the organization and to advance public health practice. [Pre-requisite: CGH 407B (1 semester)]

CGH
408 1291 1 4   Foundations of Program Planning (doctoral)
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Kim Reynolds Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This course introduces the core concepts, values, and methods of public health program planning and evaluation. Students develop skills for assessing community needs for health promotion; preparing written measurable health promotion program objectives with associated methods for achieving those objectives; designing health promotion program action plans that include implementation schemes; and evaluation strategies for measuring health program process, impact, and outcome effectiveness. Students apply their knowledge of health promotion theories to effectively to plan, implement, and evaluate health promotion and communication programs.

CGH
409 1317 1 4   Designing and Evaluating Health Behavior Interventions
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Bree Hemingway Fri 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class meets 2 hours weekly with 1 additional asynchronous hour of instruction. This course focuses on the evaluation of health behavior interventions. Health behavior interventions are implemented with the goal of causing health behavior change. Evaluations of such programs must consider whether the program was implemented as intended, whether the program caused the change it was intended to cause, and why this did or did not occur. This class will begin with students developing an intervention designed to influence health behavior, then students will develop an evaluation plan for assessing every aspect of an intervention developed by a classmate.

CGH
414 1313 1 4   Advanced Topics in Public Health Management
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Jay Orr Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Sync This course focuses on both theoretical models, and day to day responsibilities of public health management. Principles of program management and design thinking will also be explored. It aims to better equip public health managers to lead, plan effectively, anticipate challenges, and marshal resources.

CGH
417 1322 1 4   Population Health System Engineering
TextbookTextbook
Carl Johnson Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of required online asynchronous instruction. The purpose of this course is to teach the principles of systems engineering and integration for application in complex population health settings that include two or more separate and prior-existing systems including public health, community clinic (ambulatory care), hospital, and traditionally non-health organizations such as schools, NGOs, community centers, churches, etc. to bring each into concert with the other(s) for a common population health objective. This course is conducted as a workshop or clinic to produce one or more systems engineering products with students and their community counterparts working as teams.

CGH
499 1295 1 0   Doctoral Study (DrPH and PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

CLST
320 1089 1 4   Ethics of Cultural Studies
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Darrell Moore Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person In this seminar we will examine works that orient critical ethical inquiry toward conceptual, epistemological, and ethical transformation. Collectively these works foster what Gayatri Spivak phrases a rearrangement of desire. Our focus will be to examine how thinkers argumentatively create imaginative spaces designed to enable us to play with the conceptual and ethical rules and meta-rules that ground planetary capitalist culture. In addition to examining Spivak’s attempts to theorize “the reflexive re-arrangement of desires” we will examine thinkers who variously argue that we ought to rethink the nouns that ground the unfinished project of modernity as verbs such as bell hooks’ argument that theory is a practice of freedom and James Kyung-Jin Lee’s argument that race is better described as a verb than a noun as well as thinkers who argued toward, as Gilles Deleuze phrased it, a new “image of thought.” The project of the semester will be to examine how selected theorists critique their present arrangement of desire and imagine alternative possibilities. Our collective aim will be two-fold: to gain an understanding of how these thinkers problematize their present and hypothesize paths to differently grounded futures.

CLST
354 1090 1 4   The History and Theory of Museums
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Goode Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Blaisdell 7 In-Person This course examines the history and theory of museums as repositories and creators of knowledge, memory and culture. We will consider both the theoretical and practical components of museums, examining their origins, their development over time and their on-going role as a nexus of academic and public debate about core social, national and universal values. We will study recent museum exhibitions that elicited energetic public debate about content and about the role of the museum in society. In addition, we will examine the practical side of museum work as we meet museum professionals and artists who will explain how they do their work, how they like their work displayed, and how they decide what to collect and what to curate. We will also puzzle over the future of the museum as institutions, public and private, and also the future of display, collection, ownership in a multi-media and increasingly digital world. Students will be able to engage in a wide-range of projects in this course working within and across the large disciplinary terrain in which museum work and theory reside. This course satisfies a Museum Studies concentration requirement.

CLST
400M 1095 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

CLST
408 1091 1 4   Curating Art and Science
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. Faculty Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructors: Claudia Bohn-Spector and Peter Sachs Callopy. Class meetings will mostly be held on CGU campus with some meetings at Caltech and some site visits. See department for meeting location and date details. This course is a partnership between CGU School of Arts and Humanities and The California Institute of Technology. The instructors are the lead curators of an exhibition opening in the Fall of 2024 at Caltech that is part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time initiative Art x Science x L.A. Dr. Peter Sachs Collopy, University Archivist and Head of Archives and Special Collections at Caltech, and independent curator Dr. Claudia Bohn-Spector are leading a team of twelve scholars from across the United States, examining Caltech as a vibrant and complex site for scientific image production. Their project spans roughly one hundred years, from 1920 to the present. It explores how images at Caltech were made and used across disciplines and how these images have been harnessed to advance broader socio-cultural and institutional goals. This graduate seminar will explore both the theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of this multi-year curatorial effort. We examine general themes of curating art and science, and will focus specifically on aspects of the Caltech exhibition, constructing curatorial and design exercises that draw on Caltech Archives and other local collections. Students will investigate a range of visual practices at Caltech according to the specific scientific, artistic, and institutional functions they serve. What kinds of information do scientific images convey, and how do we best look at them in their varying contexts? How do we account for the choices scientists make when they represent their research, and what cultural biases/preferences might their images contain? How has photography, especially in its new digital form, changed the way scientists work and present what they find? How do scientific images relate to other Caltech images in art, technology, and popular culture? The course will include a series of guest speakers and field trips across Los Angeles.

CLST
414 1094 1 4   After, Against, Apart, Outside: Deidealization in Contemporary Cultural Studies
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: David K Seitz "The glamor has gone." Those words come from a patient of the famous psychoanalyst Melanie Klein, who theorized her patient’s psychical distress as part of a painful process she called "de-idealization." For Klein, de-idealization described a painful process whereby a once beloved part of the world (and the self) painfully and irrevocably loses its luster, or even disappears altogether. Although Klein acknowledged the acute pain of this experience, she also saw it as a possible necessity for psychical health – for the capacity to form complex attachments to people and ideals in their impurity and dynamism, and thus their reality. Taking its cues from Klein and her patient, this course examines the work of scholars across critical cultural studies of race, class, gender, and sexuality whose works chronicle or even advocate for de-idealization of various loved (and sometimes hated) political, cultural, and theoretical object of attachment, from intersectionality to reparative reading to diasporic nationhood. What might be gained from taking a break from our most axiomatic political and intellectual attachment, perhaps precisely because of the pain of separation from them? Which attachments can survive such reevaluations, and remain worth sustaining, and which do not – and for whom? We will use our time together to read and critically engage six influential cultural theory monographs from the past two decades. By reading these books in dialogue with their key theoretical intertexts—and in some cases, in dialogue with their authors—we will seek to demystify the use of theory in the monograph-length project. This is not, strictly speaking, a theory or methods course or a book-writing workshop, but rather a survey of theories and methods as they are put to work in diverse, rigorous, and politically compelling monographs. It is also informed by the hunch that all of our objects of study—even the most ostensibly redemptive—at some point prove difficult in the course of researching and writing a dissertation or monograph, and that authors explicitly theorizing problems of attachment have something to teach us all.

CLST
416 1303 1 4   Queer Projects/Digital Publics
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. Faculty Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Clayton Colmon What does it mean to create queerly via digital spaces that privilege consumption, surveillance, and hyperproductivity? What are digital publics, and how do we shape them to reflect the queer realities of race, gender, and other(ed) identities? Where can we locate methods that make room for transformative work? These and other questions will animate conversations in this course. Together, we'll contribute to activities that address specific publics--and counter-publics--in digital environments. This will involve engaging with queer methods, which Amin Ghaziani and Matt Brim describe as "an emerging field" that "uses the tenets of queer theory to critique or explore what is possible with our existing procedures." But we won't stop there. Where existing procedures end, we'll begin imagining new ones--by learning from other emergent intersectional projects in which theory serves practice. Each of us will build a collection of applied work that we'll make, workshop, and revise before sharing with a larger digital public of our choosing. Along the way, we'll discuss a range of critical and creative case studies across disciplines and digital forms--including literature, film, music, augmented reality and other technologically mediated materials.

CLST
417 1093 1 4   Film: Temporality, Subjectivity
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Darrell Moore Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person According to the Oxford English Dictionary "temporality" is "the state of existing with or having some relationship to time." In this seminar we will investigate this relationship to time – what it is and how we experience it, through an examination of moving images, primarily film, but also video, and digital. We will be interested in cinema’s ability to express ideas about time and how that expression effects on our relation to and experience of it. How do moving images mediate our experience of time? What are the affective effects on how we inhabit and understand what bodies – individual, institutional, and social-political, can do? We will explore these questions through a variety of film theorists and philosophers including Gilles Deleuze, Mary Ann Doane, Michel Foucault, Tom Gunning, Sharon Holland, David Rodowick, and Garrett Stewart. We will screen and discuss the films of, among others, Alfonso Cuaron, Claire Denis, Mati Diop, William Greaves, Wong Kar-wai, Steve McQueen, and Agnes Varda.

CLST
418 1262 1 4   Digital Media Studies
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. Faculty Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Thomas Connelly This course introduces students to a survey of topics and concepts pertaining to digital culture. We will explore histories, theories, and critical debates of new media; read topics on cyberspace as well as considering geographical and political questions of time and space. We will also examine how digital media are informing aesthetics of the moving-image, as well as their impact on the archive, ownership, fandom, and music.

CLST
429 1263 1 4   Environmental Humanities in Cultural Studies
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. Faculty Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Amy Shimshon-Santo Rooted in a commitment to social and environmental justice, environmental humanities crafts interdisciplinary spaces to study and shape culture, power, and place. This class is informed by knowledge from the intersection of culture and science while focusing on human agency, community organizing, artistic expression, cultural migration, and our evolving identities. In a supportive learning environment, participants will take positive risks to expand their understanding of culture, power, and place in their own research and creative projects. Debates over culture and the environment impact the quality of life in communities locally and globally by informing or distorting decisions made about public resources and private development including housing, transportation, water, food, the location of schools or parks, and even the carceral system. Abolitionist geographer Ruth Wilson Gilmore reminds us that "All liberation struggle is place-based liberation struggle." How might attention to the environment liberate our own aims in cultural studies? We will ground ourselves in intersectional feminist literatures on culture and nature, delving into new works by Katherine McKittrick, Rob Nixon, Judith Carney and more. Along with theoretical and historical debates, we will include applied studies of current trends in heritage and climate change. Through critical reading and discussion, personalized reflection and creativity, art and media analysis, and community-based inquiry, students will activate their imaginations and cultivate confidence centering environmental awareness in their studies, lives, and work.

CLST
470 1385 1 4   Advanced Writing Workshop: MA Thesis, Dissertation Proposal, and Publishing
TextbookTextbook
Jung-Hsien Lin Thu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Hybrid Sync Hybrid class. Class meets online with a required in-person monthly meeting (in-person meeting dates: 9/8, 10/13, 11/10, 12/8). The dynamic of the class is not a traditional seminar setting; instead it is designed as a writers’ workshop in which students serve as peer-evaluators and class-time is for workshopping individual writing projects. Students will develop their own original project that can be a final MA publishable paper, thesis/dissertation proposal, article for publication, literature review, or thesis/dissertation chapter. There are two aims of this course. The first is to discuss and workshop academic writing and publication strategies including (but not limited to): research practices and the mechanics of writing, including argumentation, significance and contestability, and structure. The second objective is to foster academic professionalization by identifying presentation and publication opportunities, and by examining and practicing grant writing, applications to PhD programs (for M.A. students), and the academic job application process (cover letters, C.V.s, teaching statements). The primary written assignment sequence will build your writing, block by block, toward a complete finished paper. All in-class sessions are structured as workshops and are geared toward teaching you how to give and receive generous collegial feedback. Workshops are not meant to be intimidating nor competitive, they will promote academic collegiality, intellectual generosity, and will teach you how to be brave enough to have your work critiqued and read in front of colleagues. While not required for Ph.D. students in Cultural Studies, they may find it useful for developing their writing. This class is required for Cultural Studies MA students.

CLST
499 1096 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

ECON
308 1131 1 4 M1 Math for Economists
TextbookTextbook
Jiusi Xiao MonTueWedThu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Sync Class begins before start of term. Class meets 8/15-8/25, Mon through Thursday, 1-4pm, after 8/25 class meets on Mon only. This course is an intensive review of mathematics that is relevant for a PhD in Economics. It is intended to help students get prepared to the rigor of our core courses in Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, and Econometrics. Topics covered include Methods of Proof, Optimization Methods and Linear Algebra. A firm understanding of mathematical techniques and its applications covered in this class. These concepts are essential for successful graduate studies in economics.

ECON
313 1079 1 4   Microeconomic Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Monica Capra Seoane Tue 2:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Class meets 2 hours weekly with 1 additional asynchronous hour of instruction. This course presents the neoclassical theory of welfare economics, demand, cost, the firm, and competitive and monopoly price in product and factor markets under conditions of certainty in a rigorous way. Introduction to positive transaction costs economics. Emphasis is placed on the student's ability not only to understand the materials presented and to apply them to concrete problems.

ECON
316 1127 1 4   Consumer Theory and General Equilibrium
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Tasoff Tue 10:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Class includes three hours of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. A modern mathematical treatment of consumer demand, theory of the firm, markets, welfare optimization, and general equilibrium. Prerequisites: ECON 313.

ECON
318 1128 1 4   Foundations of Psychology & Economics
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Tasoff Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Sync This course presents psychological and experimental economics research demonstrating departures from perfect rationality, self-interest, and other classical assumptions of economics and explores ways that these departures can be mathematically modeled and incorporated into mainstream positive and normative economics. The course will focus on the behavioral evidence itself, especially on specific formal assumptions that capture the findings in a way that can be used by economists. Economic applications will be used for illustrative purposes, but the course will emphasize formal theory. Prereq: Ec317

ECON
320 1129 1 4   Experimental Economics
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Monica Capra Seoane Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. This course introduces the subject matter, methods, and results of experimental economics. The course will stress the interaction of theory and experiment, seeking to relate questions in the theory of markets, games, and decisions to issues in experimental design and the analysis and interpretation of results.

ECON
350 1126 1 4   Global Money & Finance
TextbookTextbook
Graham Bird Mon 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Hybrid Blended Class meets online from start of term until 11/16, and then online again on 12/12; class meets in-person on 11/30 and 12/7 (with online link for those who cannot attend in person). Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Global monetary and financial issues have captured the interest of economists for very many years, with recent international events including the global financial crisis in 2008/09 and the economic and financial consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic only serving to shine an even stronger light on them. To fully understand contemporary global monetary and financial issues such as financial crises, exchange rates, international capital mobility, balance of payments policy, the role of international financial institutions and the design of the international monetary system and reform, it is necessary to have a firm grasp of not only the relevant underlying theory and empirical evidence, but also the institutional and historical framework. In addition, it is important to be aware of the political influences that affect policy decisions. Although not heavily technical, this course adopts an analytically rigorous approach to the issues covered. The course provides a succinct coverage of issues in global money and finance that should be understood by all modern professional economists. The course is required for students who are focusing on the international economics and development policy (IEDP) field. It may also be seen as a precursor to Econ 351: Contemporary Issues in International Money, Finance and Development which goes on to examine selected topics in greater detail.

ECON
381 1130 1 4   Probability & Statistics for Econometrics
TextbookTextbook
Pierangelo De Pace Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. This course covers probability and statistics. Topics include the fundamental concepts of probability theory, Bayes’ rule, notions of discrete and continuous distributions, hypothesis testing, and other necessary statistical instruments, which are widely used in almost every phase of your academic career. A firm understanding of mathematical techniques and its applications covered in this class is essential for successful graduate studies in economics. Prerequisites: Econ 300 or equivalent courses.

ECON
383 1125 1 4   Econometrics II
TextbookTextbook
Gregory J. Deangelo Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Topics in econometrics, including large sample theory, stochastic regressors, measurement error, missing data, limited dependent variables, seemingly unrelated regressions, pooled cross-sectional and time series models, non-normal disturbances. Prerequisite: ECON 382.

ECON
400M 1374 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

ECON
499 1368 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EDUC
PCUI1 1365 1 6 - 10   Clinical Induction I
TextbookTextbook
Frances Martinez Kellar  -
No Room Needed Supervision Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. Department consent required. This class is for teachers in the first term of CGU's Induction Program. This clinical course is aligned to FACT and strives to help the novice teacher reflect upon and develop in his/her teaching acumen. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
PCUI3 1366 1 6   Clinical Induction III
TextbookTextbook
Frances Martinez Kellar  -
No Room Needed Supervision Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. Department consent required. This class is for teachers in the third term of CGU's Induction Program. This clinical course is aligned to FACT and strives to help the novice teacher reflect upon and develop in his/her teaching acumen. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
170G 1345 1 4   Introduction to Public School Teaching
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Hatkoff Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person In this course, we will adopt a critical and compassionate approach to exploring public schools in the United States. We will consider relevant history, sociology, pedagogy, economics, policy, culture and more of public schools to help us understand current narratives about, perspectives of, and approaches to K-12 public school practices, ideologies, and reform movements. Through readings, guest speakers, class activities & discussions, we will all grow better acquainted with the challenges and opportunities public schools and teachers face. In particular, I hope students emerge empowered to discuss, evaluate, and one day impact positive change regarding the influence of and opportunities within: public discourse and narratives about public schools, teachers, households, students, and teaching; changing and diverse student populations; federal and local policies; households’ and communities’ cultural wealth and funds of knowledge; student, teacher, and school performance and "accountability"; effective/ineffective, affirming/dismissing, and engaging/alienating school and teacher practices, policies, and culture.

EDUC
301 1327 1 4 M1 Teach Learn Process for Equity And Social Justice 1 MtplSub
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez, Rebecca Hatkoff MonTueWedThu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Class meets Mon-Thurs from 8/1-8/25. Class begins before start of term. Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a TK-6 setting. This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program.

EDUC
301S 1329 1 4 M1 Teach Learn Process for Equity And Social Justice 1 SPED
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Hatkoff MonTueWedThu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Class meets Mon-Thurs from 8/1-8/25. Class begins before start of term. Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a special education K-12 setting. This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. Aligned with the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE), this course aims to prepare candidates for teaching positions in special education settings (mild/moderate and moderate/severe), including inclusive and mainstream environments. This course provides students with an introduction to research-based principles of teaching and learning with particular emphasis placed on the practical implications of effective lesson planning, classroom management, culturally responsive teaching practices, assessment, and effective strategies for reaching all students in diverse settings. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
302 1328 1 4 M1 Teach Learn Process for Equity And Social Justice 1 SnglSub
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Hatkoff MonTueWedThu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Class meets Mon-Thurs from 8/1-8/25. Class begins before start of term. Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a single-subject settings (typically at the middle- or high-school level). This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. Aligned with the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE), this course aims to prepare candidates for teaching positions in single-subject classrooms. This course provides students with an introduction to research-based principles of teaching and learning with particular emphasis placed on the practical implications of effective lesson planning, classroom management, culturally responsive teaching practices, assessment, and effective strategies for reaching all students in diverse settings. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303 1330 1 2   Teaching & Learning Process 2: Cultivating Differentiated Classroom Ecologies- Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Hatkoff Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Blended Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17, 10/8, 11/5, 12/3. The second in a four-part series, TLP II is a course designed to prepare candidates for working within the K-12 school system; it is the academic complement to the clinical component of the Fall semester. In this class multiple subject candidates explore their own funds of knowledge as professional educators; the funds of knowledge that ELs and students with special needs bring to the classroom; and the funds of knowledge that students’ households possess. Candidates continue their ethnographic narrative project work by conducting home visits and interviewing three focus students: an English learner, a student with an IEP or 504 plan, and a student with significant life experience.  In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.  Our collective focus will be on developing teacher competencies and specifically on learning how to create and sustain healthy classroom ecologies that affirm all students.

EDUC
303A 1347 1 2   Internship Teaching 1. Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Blended Instructor: Brittney Rodriguez. Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p This class is for candidates working in area schools as “interns” or “residents.”  EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on “internship credentials.”  They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide on-site guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303ASE 1356 1 2   Internship Teaching 1. SPED Extensive Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Blended Instructor: Brittney Rodriguez. Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p This class is for candidates working in area schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials." They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide on-site guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates. Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303ASM 1355 1 2   Internship Teaching 1. SPED Mild/Moderate Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Blended Instructor: Brittney Rodriguez. Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p This class is for candidates working in area schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; development and implementation of standards-based IEPs; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials." They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide on-site guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303B 1358 1 1   Student Teaching 1. Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Instructor: Brittney Rodriguez. Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p. Online clinical practicum is required for all Residents on select Mondays: 9/19, 10/24,11/14, 12/12 This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions.  This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303BSE 1364 1 1   Student Teaching 1: SPED Extensive Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Instructor: Brittney Rodriguez. Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p. Online clinical practicum is required for all Residents on select Mondays: 9/19, 10/24, 11/24, 12/12 This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency"" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions. This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting.

EDUC
303BSM 1359 1 1   Student Teaching 1. SPED Mild/Moderate Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Instructor: Brittney Rodriguez. Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p. Online clinical practicum is required for all Residents on select Mondays: 9/19, 10/24, 11/14, 12/12 This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions.  This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303C 1361 1 1   Residency Teaching 1. Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Instructor: Brittney Rodriguez. Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p. Online Clinical Practicum is required for all Residents on Select Mondays: 9/19, 10/24, 11/14, 12/12 This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials." They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching. 

EDUC
303CSE 1363 1 1   Residency Teaching 1. SPED Extensive Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Instructor: Brittany Rodriguez Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p. Online Clinical Practicum is required for all Residents on select Mondays: 9/19, 10/24, 11/14, 12/12 This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; development and implementation of standards-based IEPs; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials." They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates. Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303CSM 1362 1 1   Residency Teaching 1. SPED Mild/Moderate Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Instructor: Brittney Rodriguez. Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p. Online Clinical Practicum is required for all Residents on select Mondays: 9/19, 10/24, 11/14, 12/12 This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; development and implementation of standards-based IEPs; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials." They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303S 1331 1 2   Teaching & Learning Process 2: Cultivating Differentiated Classroom Ecologies- SPED
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Samara Suafo'a. Class meets on Tues 8/30, 9/13, 9/27, 10/11, 10/25, 11/8, 11/29. The second in a four-part series, TLP II is a course designed to prepare candidates for working within the K-12 school system; it is the academic complement to the clinical component of the Fall semester. In this class education specialist candidates explore their own funds of knowledge as professional educators; the funds of knowledge that ELs and students with special needs bring to the classroom; and the funds of knowledge that students’ households possess. Candidates continue their ethnographic narrative project work by conducting home visits and interviewing three focus students: an English learner, a student with an IEP or 504 plan, and a student with significant life experience.  In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.  Our collective focus will be on developing teacher competencies and specifically on learning how to create and sustain healthy classroom ecologies that affirm all students.

EDUC
304 1332 1 2   Teaching & Learning Process 2: Cultivating Differentiated Classroom Ecologies- Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Samara Suafo'a. Class meets on Tues 8/30, 9/13, 9/27, 10/11, 10/25, 11/8, 11/29. The second in a four-part series, TLP II is a course designed to prepare candidates for working within the K-12 school system; it is the academic complement to the clinical component of the Fall semester. In this class single subject candidates explore their own funds of knowledge as professional educators; the funds of knowledge that ELs and students with special needs bring to the classroom; and the funds of knowledge that students’ households possess. Candidates continue their ethnographic narrative project work by conducting home visits and interviewing three focus students: an English learner, a student with an IEP or 504 plan, and a student with significant life experience.  In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.  Our collective focus will be on developing teacher competencies and specifically on learning how to create and sustain healthy classroom ecologies that affirm all students.

EDUC
304A 1360 1 2   Internship Teaching 1. Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Instructor: Brittany Rodriguez Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17, 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 304A (for interns) and EDUC 304C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing a positive learning environment; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials." They are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide on-site guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
304B 1357 1 1   Student Teaching 1. Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Instructor: Brittany Rodriguez Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions.  This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
304C 1354 1 1   Residency Teaching 1. Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Hybrid Blended Instructor: Brittany Rodriguez Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 304A (for interns) and EDUC 304C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing a positive learning environment; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials."  They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305A 1351 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Hybrid Blended Instructor: Brittany Rodriguez Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns.  EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents.  This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III.   Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll.  The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305ASE 1353 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: SPED Extensive Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Hybrid Blended Instructor: Brittany Rodriguez Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASM, and 305ASE are for interns. EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSM, and 305CSE are for residents. This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III. Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll. The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305ASM 1352 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: SPED Mild/Moderate Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Hybrid Blended Instructor: Brittany Rodriguez Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p This class is for candidates working in schools as “interns” or “residents.”  EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns.  EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents.  This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III.   Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll.  The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
306A 1350 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Hybrid Blended Instructor: Brittany Rodriguez Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9/17 from 9a-3p, and 10/8, 11/5, 12/3 from 9a-12p This class is for candidates working in schools as “interns” or “residents.”  EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns.  EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents.  This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III.   Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll.  The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
324-1A 1333 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1A: Gen Ed Elem & K-12 SPED
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructors: Rebecca Canham. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 9/6 & 9/8, 9/20 & 9/22, 10/4 & 10/6, 10/18 & 10/20. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part one of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a multiple subject or education specialist credential. In this phase of the program (Phase 1), candidates add to their foundational knowledge of the theoretical and practical considerations teachers must possess as they prepare to enter the teaching profession. In this class, candidates will develop a professional vocabulary, decision-making skills, and habits of mind to support their mastery of the following domains of the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies: Philosophy of Education, Pedagogy, and Science of Learning. They will also plan for classroom ecologies to scaffold and celebrate socio-emotional learning. Candidates will acquire content knowledge in English Language Arts (ELA), Math, and ELD as well as a research-based repertoire of instructional methods to teach these subjects. Candidates will explore the five basic principles of the science of reading to prepare them to teach students how to read. Finally, they will consider how to serve students receiving special education services in ways that support the mission of critical social justice education.

EDUC
324-1B 1348 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1B: Gen Ed Elem & K-12 SPED
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructors: Rebecca Canham. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 11/1 & 11/3, 11/15 & 11/17, 12/6 & 12/8, 12/13 & 12/15. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part two of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a multiple subject or education specialist credential. In this phase of the program (Phase 1), candidates add to their foundational knowledge of the theoretical and practical considerations teachers must possess as they prepare to enter the teaching profession. In this class, candidates will develop a professional vocabulary, decision-making skills, and habits of mind to support their mastery of the following domains of the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies: Philosophy of Education, Pedagogy, and Science of Learning. They will also plan for classroom ecologies to scaffold and celebrate socio-emotional learning. Candidates will acquire content knowledge in English Language Arts (ELA), Math, and ELD as well as a research-based repertoire of instructional methods to teach these subjects. Candidates will explore the five basic principles of the science of reading to prepare them to teach students how to read. Finally, they will consider how to serve students receiving special education services in ways that support the mission of critical social justice education.

EDUC
326-1A 1334 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1A: English
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Kimberly Kemmer. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 9/6 & 9/8, 9/20 & 9/22, 10/4 & 10/6, 10/18 & 10/20. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part one of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a single subject credential in English. The class addresses both content area and methods. This course introduces middle and high school English candidates to current pedagogical perspectives on English education/instruction. This course will guide candidates in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate instruction by focusing on preparation for discipline-specific teaching, practical strategies and models, assessment models, and developing as a professional. Emphasis will be given to the diverse nature of California’s student population, the role of literacy in instruction, the integration of current brain research, and the use of technology in discipline-specific instruction. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
326-1B 1339 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1B: English
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Kimberly Kemmer. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 11/1 & 11/3, 11/15 & 11/17, 12/6 & 12/8, 12/13 & 12/15. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part two of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a single subject credential in English. The class addresses both content area and methods. This course introduces middle and high school English candidates to current pedagogical perspectives on English education/instruction. This course will guide candidates in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate instruction by focusing on preparation for discipline-specific teaching, practical strategies and models, assessment models, and developing as a professional. Emphasis will be given to the diverse nature of California’s student population, the role of literacy in instruction, the integration of current brain research, and the use of technology in discipline-specific instruction. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
327-1A 1335 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1A: World Languages
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Christine Rodriguez. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 9/6 & 9/8, 9/20 & 9/22, 10/4 & 10/6, 10/18 & 10/20. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part one of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a single subject credential in a World Language. The class addresses both content area and methods. This course introduces middle and high school world language candidates to current pedagogical perspectives on world language education/instruction. This course will guide candidates in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate instruction by focusing on preparation for discipline-specific teaching, practical strategies and models, assessment models, and developing as a professional. Emphasis will be given to the diverse nature of California’s student population, the role of literacy in instruction, the integration of current brain research, and the use of technology in discipline-specific instruction. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
327-1B 1340 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1B: World Languages
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Christine Rodriguez. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 11/1 & 11/3, 11/15 & 11/17, 12/6 & 12/8, 12/13 & 12/15. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part two of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a single subject credential in a World Language. The class addresses both content area and methods. This course introduces middle and high school world language candidates to current pedagogical perspectives on world language education/instruction. This course will guide candidates in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate instruction by focusing on preparation for discipline-specific teaching, practical strategies and models, assessment models, and developing as a professional. Emphasis will be given to the diverse nature of California’s student population, the role of literacy in instruction, the integration of current brain research, and the use of technology in discipline-specific instruction. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
338 1344 1 2   Humanizing Special Education: Designing Student-Centered IEPs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 6:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Danielle Frierson Jenkins. Class meets 9/1, 9/15, 9/29, 10/13, 10/27, 11/10, 12/1 Candidates will learn advanced emotional and behavior methodology that supports the academic and social needs of students with disabilities that encourage social justice. Candidates will explore assessment and observation practices necessary to conduct effective functional behavior analysis (FBA) assessments as well as utilize assessment data and research-based methodology to create positive behavior support and intervention plans. Applied behavior analysis methodologies as well as the impact of environmental design and instruction of replacement behaviors will be integrated. Implementation of functional replacement behaviors as well as differential reinforcements will be emphasized. Participants will use the process of the development of positive behavior support plans to collaborate with general educators, parents, and related service providers to make data-based regarding the needs of diverse learners.

EDUC
348-1A 1336 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1A: Science
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Leena Bakshi. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 9/6 & 9/8, 9/20 & 9/22, 10/4 & 10/6, 10/18 & 10/20. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part one of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a single subject credential in science. The class addresses both content area and methods. This course introduces middle and high school science candidates to current pedagogical perspectives on science education/instruction. This course will guide candidates in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate instruction by focusing on preparation for discipline-specific teaching, practical strategies and models, assessment models, and developing as a professional. Emphasis will be given to the diverse nature of California’s student population, the role of literacy in instruction, the integration of current brain research, and the use of technology in discipline-specific instruction. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
348-1B 1341 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1B: Science
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Leena Bakshi. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 11/1 & 11/3, 11/15 & 11/17, 12/6 & 12/8, 12/13 & 12/15. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part two of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a single subject credential in science. The class addresses both content area and methods. This course introduces middle and high school science candidates to current pedagogical perspectives on science education/instruction. This course will guide candidates in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate instruction by focusing on preparation for discipline-specific teaching, practical strategies and models, assessment models, and developing as a professional. Emphasis will be given to the diverse nature of California’s student population, the role of literacy in instruction, the integration of current brain research, and the use of technology in discipline-specific instruction. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
349-1A 1337 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1A: Mathematics
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: TBD. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 9/6 & 9/8, 9/20 & 9/22, 10/4 & 10/6, 10/18 & 10/20. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part one of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a single subject credential in mathematics. The class addresses both content area and methods. This course introduces middle and high school mathematics candidates to current pedagogical perspectives on mathematics education/instruction. This course will guide candidates in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate instruction by focusing on preparation for discipline-specific teaching, practical strategies and models, assessment models, and developing as a professional. Emphasis will be given to the diverse nature of California’s student population, the role of literacy in instruction, the integration of current brain research, and the use of technology in discipline-specific instruction. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
349-1B 1342 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1B: Mathematics
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: TBD. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 11/1 & 11/3, 11/15 & 11/17, 12/6 & 12/8, 12/13 & 12/15. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part two of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a single subject credential in mathematics. The class addresses both content area and methods. This course introduces middle and high school mathematics candidates to current pedagogical perspectives on mathematics education/instruction. This course will guide candidates in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate instruction by focusing on preparation for discipline-specific teaching, practical strategies and models, assessment models, and developing as a professional. Emphasis will be given to the diverse nature of California’s student population, the role of literacy in instruction, the integration of current brain research, and the use of technology in discipline-specific instruction. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
353-1A 1338 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1A: Social Science
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Elizabeth Ramos. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 9/6 & 9/8, 9/20 & 9/22, 10/4 & 10/6, 10/18 & 10/20. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part one of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a single subject credential in social science. The class addresses both content area and methods. This course introduces middle and high school social science candidates to current pedagogical perspectives on social science education/instruction. This course will guide candidates in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate instruction by focusing on preparation for discipline-specific teaching, practical strategies and models, assessment models, and developing as a professional. Emphasis will be given to the diverse nature of California’s student population, the role of literacy in instruction, the integration of current brain research, and the use of technology in discipline-specific instruction. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
353-1B 1343 1 3   Literacy & Methods 1B: Social Science
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Elizabeth Ramos. Class meets Tue & Thurs, 11/1 & 11/3, 11/15 & 11/17, 12/6 & 12/8, 12/13 & 12/15. An additional 7.5 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity will be required. This is part two of a four-part discipline specific class for individuals working towards a single subject credential in social science. The class addresses both content area and methods. This course introduces middle and high school social science candidates to current pedagogical perspectives on social science education/instruction. This course will guide candidates in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate instruction by focusing on preparation for discipline-specific teaching, practical strategies and models, assessment models, and developing as a professional. Emphasis will be given to the diverse nature of California’s student population, the role of literacy in instruction, the integration of current brain research, and the use of technology in discipline-specific instruction. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
374 1346 1 1   California Teaching Performance Assessment (CalTPA) Cycle I Support
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 5:30PM -
7:20PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Brittney Rodriguez. Class meets 8/31, 9/28, 10/12, 10/26, 11/9, 11/16, 11/30 Preliminary teaching candidates will work on the California Teaching Performance Assessment Tasks Cycle 1 in preparation for submission of their portfolio to the state by December. Feedback and guidance will be offered aligned to the CalTPA Assessment Guide. Pre-requisite for Cycle 1 Course: Candidates must record a single lesson that demonstrates the required content for each of the 3 video clips. All required content for each video clip must be demonstrated within 5 minutes each. See Cycle 1 V04 assessment guide for more details. Note: For Fall 2022 there is NO pre-req regarding the recording of videos. (There is a pre-req regarding recording of videos for this class for its summer 2022 scheduling sent in last week. If you need clarification, please speak with your department)

EDUC
400M 1349 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

EDUC
410 1242 1 4   An Introduction to Community Engaged Education and Social Change
TextbookTextbook
Torie L Weiston Mon 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of online asynchronous instructional activity. An introduction to the CEESC program, this course provides an overview of the program itself as well as engages students in a broad discussion of the issues with which the program is designed to address. Maintaining a focus on "bridging the divide between education and activism," this course provides students with opportunities to explore the issues impacting youth and education as well as the various solutions being offered by various stakeholders. Connecting readings, discussions and assignments with field trips and guest speakers to illuminate the critical connection between school and community, this course will provide preliminary opportunities for students to explore their CEESC Capstone projects and to make important connections to community organizations engaging in critical work.

EDUC
419 1243 1 2 M1 The Undocumented Experience: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives
TextbookTextbook
Gloria I Montiel Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of online asynchronous instructional activity. This 2-unit course is part of the Allies of Dreamers Certificate Program and is specifically designed for student affairs professionals, community leaders, and K-12 educators who want to effectively meet the needs of undocumented students (PreK-20) and their families. Students who aren’t in the Allies of Dreamers Program are welcome to take this course. It should be noted, however, that students who are taking the course as part of the Allies Certificate Program should take the class in a sequenced order: 419, 420, 421 and 422. This specific class introduces students to the critical study of U.S. immigration and citizenship by exploring the historical, political, legal, social, and cultural factors that have shaped the experiences of unauthorized immigrants.

EDUC
420 1244 1 2 M2 Higher Education Access & Professional Experiences for Undocumented Youth
TextbookTextbook
Gloria I Montiel Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended This 2-unit course is part of the Allies of Dreamers Certificate Program and is specifically designed for student affairs professionals, community leaders, and K-12 educators who want to effectively meet the needs of undocumented students (PreK-20) and their families. Students who aren’t in the Allies of Dreamers Program are welcome to take this course. It should be noted, however, that students who are taking the course as part of the Allies Certificate Program should take the class in a sequenced order: 419, 420, 421 and 422. This specific class examines seminal scholarship on higher education access and workforce transition for undocumented students, focusing on state and federal policies that have expanded this access.

EDUC
435 1245 1 4   Sociology of Education
TextbookTextbook
Guan Kung Saw Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of required online asynchronous instruction. This course is an introduction to key sociological theories in studying sociocultural contexts in education, including social organization of schooling, social capital, cultural capital, and life course theories. It focuses on the effects of school, peer, family, and neighborhood on educational outcomes for diverse student groups, defined by race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and immigration generation, etc. Topics of this course cover the entire span of a student's academic career, from preschool to postsecondary education.

EDUC
445 1246 1 4   Introduction to Educational Evaluation, Assessment & Effectiveness
TextbookTextbook
Gwen E. Garrison Tue 4:00PM -
5:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes additional online asynchronous instructional activity. This course will introduce the concepts of educational evaluation, assessment, and effectiveness. The course begins with a foundation in program evaluation as the formal process of systematic quantitative or qualitative data collection and analysis to describe the success of educational policy, program or process. Assessment is the deliberate data collection process that supports evaluation often using metrics at regular intervals to monitor progress. Effectiveness explores the way we can determine if a policy, program, or process produces the desired result. By exploring these topics, this course provides an important foundation in educational research methods. The outcome of this course will be the ability to gauge effectiveness through a detailed plan that supports external evaluation requirements with internal assessment practices. This course is offered as a hybrid with both CGU and online meetings. This class is being designed to be hybrid with some sessions being at CGU and some sessions being held with virtual tools. It has not yet been determined what the ratio will be between traditional and online sessions. Given the online sessions, it is imperative that students have access to a working computer that has a microphone and camera and that the student has access to reliable internet service. Students can always utilize the CGU computer labs if needed.

EDUC
448 1247 1 4   Introduction to Data System Management & Governance
TextbookTextbook
Gwen E. Garrison Thu 4:00PM -
5:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes additional online asynchronous instructional activity. This course will explore the aspects to strengthen and enhance educational system data in short- and long-term topics through leading data management and governance efforts in security, compliance, data storage, and technologies. Outcome of this course will be fundamental knowledge and promising practices of data management and data stewardship. This course is offered as a hybrid with both CGU and online meetings. This class is being designed to be hybrid with some sessions being at CGU and some sessions being held with virtual tools. It has not yet been determined what the ratio will be between traditional and online sessions. Given the online sessions, it is imperative that students have access to a working computer that has a microphone and camera and that the student has access to reliable internet service. Students can always utilize the CGU computer labs if needed.

EDUC
449 1248 1 4   Clinical Practicum for Educational Evaluation and Data Analysis Students
TextbookTextbook
Gwen E. Garrison Wed 4:00PM -
5:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes additional online asynchronous instructional activity. Instructor consent required. See department for registration permission number. This course prepares EEDA students to launch their career in education evaluation and evaluation. Each student will prepare their professional portfolio and complete a project in one of four core areas: research and evaluation planning, data governance, data storytelling, or a research project. This final project will allow students to apply their skills and demonstrate mastery in a program outcome.

EDUC
450 1249 1 4   Practicum in Student Affairs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Jennifer Alanis. Class meets Mon 8/29, 9/12, 9/26, 10/10, 10/24, 11/7, 11/28, 12/12 and additional online asynchronous instructional activity. Instructor consent required. See department for registration permission number. Practicum in Student Affair provides you with an opportunity to apply what you have learned in your coursework in the authentic context of a student affairs office or related students affairs position. Students in this class are expected to work on an authentic project within their office at a college or university. The practicum placement is paired with university-based sessions where the students make sense of their practicum experiences as a collective and discuss professional expectations and norms. Central to this approach is your progress toward becoming a practitioner-scholar, a professional who can apply research and scholarship in the field to the everyday demands of a position in student affairs. Students will develop competencies around theories and conceptual frameworks; communication; access & equity; policy & law; and professional socialization.

EDUC
459 1250 1 4   Historical Foundations in Higher Education
TextbookTextbook
Linda Perkins Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous This course is an historical overview of American higher education from the Colonial period to the present. The founding of nine colleges by Protestant denominations for the training of white male leadership characterized the first 150 years of American higher education. The first half of the course will concentrate on these early “old time colonial colleges” and their curricula and the later proliferation of colleges that occurred in the nineteenth century. Attention shall be given to the movement from “elite” education of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to “mass” education in the late and early nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These later time periods resulted in the growth of state universities and the founding of institutions for “special” populations of students (e.g. women, African Americans and Catholics). The second half of the course will discuss the rise and growth of the research university and its relationship to federal and private funding and the impact that this funding has had on higher education in the twentieth century. Throughout the course, attention shall be given to the history of the undergraduate curriculum for various types of institutions, the changing purposes of higher education, and the growth in hierarchical categorization of higher education.

EDUC
461 1251 1 4   The College Student Experience
TextbookTextbook
Deborah F Carter Wed 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of online asynchronous instructional activity. This course focuses on the college student experience and related literature, theory, and research. Special consideration is given to the increasing diversity of college students, identity issues in college, factors that influence success, and implications for practice in college and universities. Students will have an opportunity to focus on a topic of their choosing.

EDUC
464 1252 1 4   College Student Development: Research, Theory, and Practice
TextbookTextbook
Dina Maramba Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous This seminar provides an overview of college student development theory and learning in the U.S. Attention is given to historical and emerging perspectives, relevant research, and critiques influential in understanding students in post-secondary institutions. Emphasis is placed on the integration of theory, research, and practice.

EDUC
473 1253 1 4   Qualitative Research Inquiry I
TextbookTextbook
Dina Maramba Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous The purpose of this working seminar is to become familiar with the theoretical perspectives and purposes that inform a variety of qualitative research as well as the various models and methods that can be employed. Seminar participants will examine selected works in education that have employed qualitative research and relate to their own interests. Application of the theory, models and methods will be integrated as we work as a class to help one another develop their theoretical orientation, research question, and choose the most appropriate model and methods. Participants will develop a brief qualitative research proposal during the course of the semester and develop an interview protocol and conduct, transcribe and evaluate one interview using the protocol. Participants will also hear from graduates who have used qualitative research in their own work that has been published.

EDUC
478 1254 1 4   Quantitative Research Methods I
TextbookTextbook
Guan Kung Saw Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous This course provides a solid foundation for conducting quantitative research in education. In this course, you will learn about basic statistical concepts, the entire data analysis process, allowing you to design your own survey, analyze data, and produce well-written, professional reports based on your results. First, you will be introduced to primary data collection including questionnaire design, sampling frames, and sample selection. You will either use an existing dataset or create and collect your own survey data using Qualtrics, a powerful questionnaire-design package that is available to all CGU students. Next, you will be introduced to Stata, a widely used statistical software package. This will include the use of programming language to analyze the data from your own survey and other secondary data. As we move through the course, you will learn to determine which statistical tests are appropriate and to use these tests to analyze data using computing software Stata, which is available on the cloud-based Apporto platform, provided by CGU. Finally, you will learn how to describe the results of statistical tests for both technical and lay audiences.

EDUC
484 1255 1 0 - 4   Practicum in Doctoral Research
TextbookTextbook
Susan Paik Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous This class is designed to help students author a defendable dissertation proposal. Specifically, this course provides students an opportunity to synthesize and apply course-based knowledge regarding doctoral research techniques in a seminar setting. The course is designed for students who have completed their coursework, taken EDUC 580B: Capstone, and who would, in preparation for submitting a dissertation proposal, benefit from collaborative practice and critique. Students will craft problem statements, research questions, conceptual frameworks, and research designs. They will do this work themselves and they will discuss the work of their peers, honing their skills together as they do so. As a result of this structured and iterative process, students should be better prepared to produce a dissertation research proposal that represents both the culmination to their doctoral education and an original contribution to knowledge in their fields. Over the course of the term, students in the class will check-in with their dissertation chair to ensure that they and their chairs are “on the same page” regarding their dissertation research. Lastly, this class is offered satisfactory/unsatisfactory and will have scheduled (weekly) class meetings. Students who do not attend the class sessions, do not make satisfactory progress on the assignments, and do not participate in class activities will not pass this class. It is expected that this class will only be taken once (for 0-units/no cost). If the course needs to be retaken, the student will need to obtain permission from his/her/their academic advisor and dean and will be charged for 2-units (with no department fellowships provided). If the course needs to be taken a third time, the student will need to obtain permission from his/her/their academic advisor and dean and will be charged for 4-units (with no department fellowships provided). Often taking/passing this class is a condition for an “extension of time” being granted.

EDUC
485A 1256 1 2   Research Practicum, Part A
TextbookTextbook
Emilie N. Reagan Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Class meets in-person on 9/6 & 12/6, and online on 9/20, 10/4, 10/18, 11/1, 11/15. Instructor consent required. See department for registration permission number. This class works in conjunction with Research Practicum Part B. Together the two courses span two consecutive terms (typically meeting every other week during each term). Students are expected to enroll in both Part A (2-units) and Part B (2-units) in consecutive terms. The class is limited to nine students and is only offered Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (with a Satisfactory indicating that the student is getting a “B” or better in the course). The goal of the class is for the faculty and students to work as a research team that takes a collaborative research project through an entire arc/cycle, from conception through literature review through theoretical & methodological design through data collection through data analysis and ending with the reporting of findings. Students need not have preexisting familiarity with the subject matter. In the context of this class, students will work together under the guidance of the faculty member to identify the topic of their project, define the problem and its significance, author a literature review, design the study, get the project approved by IRB, collect and analyze the data, and articulate the findings and their implications. The group will also identify appropriate conferences and journals for potential manuscript submission. The goal of the class is to give students tangible experience with a full empirical research process prior to designing and implementing their own dissertation study. Students are expected to attend all class sessions as scheduled. This class can only be taken once. The work done as part of this class cannot be used as a qualifying exam but students can ask that the faculty member evaluate their skills in terms of specific doctoral competencies. Students are encouraged to contact the faculty member via email prior to registration opening if they have any questions. It is expected that this class may fill quickly. If this is the case, contact SES@cgu.edu and ask that you be put on a waiting list. (Make the subject of the email: "Please put me on the waiting list for the Research Practicum Class.")

EDUC
499 1367 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EDUC
580A 1257 1 2   Proseminar for Doctoral Study
TextbookTextbook
Emilie N. Reagan Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Class meets 8/29, 9/12, 9/26, 10/10, 10/24, 11/7, 11/21, 12/5. The seminar will provide an introduction to the work and thought of School of Educational Studies faculty through a series of lectures, readings and discussions. Althought designed to introduce new students to the intellectual life of SES faculty, the seminar is open to all graduate students in education. The seminar will also provide information to reinforce the basic structure of the graduate program and how to successfully complete a program doctorate. Mandatory for new students, except by permission from the student's advisor. Available for all students by credit or audit.

EDUC
580B 1258 1 2   Capstone for Doctoral Research
TextbookTextbook
David Drew Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Class meets 8/29, 9/12, 9/26, 10/10, 10/24, 11/7, 11/21, 12/5. Instructor consent required. See department for registration permission number. This course is primarily designed to prepare doctoral students for the process of writing their research outlines and dissertation proposals. In addition, it will allow students to gain the skills necessary to critically evaluate the design of published research in their respective areas of expertise. The target audience for the course is doctoral students in the School of Educational Studies (SES) who have completed their first qualifying exam, research tools (i.e., taken qualitative, mixed, and/or quantitative methods courses), and who are at or near the proposal stage of their doctoral programs. Students will be required to work with their peers and the instructor to craft a mock dissertation proposal which will include the following sections:  (1) introduction (i.e., purpose, statement, and research questions), (2) literature review map, (3) theoretical framework, and (4) methods (i.e., sample, data collection, data analysis, and limitations). Prerequisite: Departmental approval, pending confirmation of 62 units of completed coursework (including transfer units), two filed research tools, and one approved qualifying exam. Note: This course is required for all doctoral students in SES entering in Summer 2013 or later. Although the focus will be on proposal development, it does not take the place of the doctoral advisor and dissertation committee. Students must consult with their advisor regarding the expected format and content of their dissertation proposal.  Enrollment Instructions: Students who have no holds on their account can register to the waitlist for the course via the Student Portal (myCGU). The SES Office will review the readiness (including both fulfillment of requirements and length of time in the program) of each person on the waiting list and, upon dean/instructor approval, register eligible waitlisted students on a space available basis.

EDUC
601 1259 1 4   Research Methods and Design
TextbookTextbook
Susan Paik Sat 9:00AM -
3:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Class meets 9/10, 9/24, 10/8, 10/22, 11/5, 11/19, 12/3. Instructor consent required. See department for registration permission number. The purpose of this course is to introduce doctoral-level education students to quantitative and qualitative educational research traditions, procedures, theories, and methods. Emphasis is placed on identifying methods appropriate for particular research questions and conducting disciplined inquiry regardless of method selected. Students will be expected to compare and contrast various measurement tools used in educational research and to label those tools that will be useful in their own research. Note: Completion of Quant 1 (ED 465 or the equivalent) prior to (or concurrent with) this course is strongly recommended. This course is an introduction to research methods and design; the content of the course can be helpful and applied throughout the doctoral program. The ideal time to take ED 601 is earlier in the program (as early as second to the fourth semester) and it should not be taken as one of the last courses in your program plan. Students who are interested in developing their dissertation proposals should take ED 580B Capstone for Doctoral Research. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 10-12 units (3 courses) in PhD program and instructor permission. Education PhD Students only (12 students max). Enrollment Instructions: If interested in the class, please e-mail ses@cgu.edu and indicate in the email subject line: ED 601. Provide the following information: 1) number of total units completed in the PhD program (CGU and/or SDSU-CGU Program), and 2) identify any methods courses (research tools) taken as part of those units. Permission by instructor approval only.

EDUC
632UL 1260 1 4   Models of Leadership
TextbookTextbook
Frances M. Gipson Fri 4:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Class meets 8/26, 9/9, 9/23, 10/7, 10/21, 11/4, 12/2. Department consent required. The purpose of this course is to introduce doctoral-level education students (school leaders in Urban Leadership Program) to quantitative and qualitative educational research traditions, procedures, theories, methods, and design. Emphasis is placed on identifying methods appropriate for particular research questions and conducting disciplined inquiry regardless of method selected. Students will be expected to compare and contrast various measurement tools used in educational research and to label those tools that will be useful in their own research.

EDUC
633UL 1282 1 4   Analyzing & Designing Empirical Research in School Contexts
TextbookTextbook
Emilie N. Reagan Sat 9:00AM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Class meets on select Sat: 8/27, 9/10, 9/24, 10/8, 10/22, 11/5, 12/3. Department consent required. This course provides the fundamental knowledge and skills necessary for conducting quality empirical research in education, with a specific focus on school contexts. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the research problem and purpose, formulate research questions, and design studies to address to these questions. Additionally, students will be able to locate, understand, evaluate, and interpret qualitative and quantitative educational research and use these skills to identify possible dissertation topics.

EDUC
657 1261 1 4   Access & Equity in Higher Education
TextbookTextbook
Deborah F Carter Mon 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of online asynchronous instructional activity. This course is designed to introduce individuals to the research, theoretical, and practical issues surrounding access to college and equity in higher education institutions. This course specifically addresses access and equity issues as they relate to racial/ethnic minority groups and socioeconomic status. The major themes covered in the course are: college choice, affirmative action, community colleges, financial aid, and access to the professoriate.

EDUC
695 1283 1 4   Theory, Methods, and Practice in International Comparative Education
TextbookTextbook
Thomas Luschei Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Educational policies, practices, and outcomes vary tremendously across world regions and nation states. Examination of this variability by researchers and policy makers has led to the identification of “education superstars” to emulate, such as Finland, Singapore, and South Korea. However, sound international comparisons of educational performance require careful consideration of cross-national comparability, national and local contexts, and the powerful push and pull of global and local forces. The objective of this course is to shed light on the practice of international educational comparison by providing students with an introduction to theory, methods, and practice in the field of international comparative education (ICE). Students will examine the historical, theoretical, and methodological origins of ICE; assess multiple definitions and conceptions of ICE; and develop an understanding of how researchers apply comparative methods to understand educational policy issues across regional and national settings. We will approach cross-national educational comparison from four points of view: (1) comparisons of educational performance across regions and countries, (2) the theoretical frameworks that inform such comparisons, (3) the range of methods and methodologies that can be used to conduct comparative studies, and (4) how comparative study can be used to improve educational policy and practice.

ENGLISH
330 1097 1 4   The Contemporary Novel
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Jane Hu What is the state of the contemporary novel? Where does today’s novel come from? Where is it going? This course offers a survey of Anglo-American novels published since the turn of twentieth century to ask how the novel has evolved to our present moment. In particular, we will examine how the traditional 19th century realist novel has adapted in order to represent our contemporary era of finance capitalism, digital mediation, neoliberal globalization, and general climate collapse. Readings will include both contemporary novels (by authors such as Sigrid Nunez, Zadie Smith, Susan Choi, Rachel Cusk, David Mitchell, and Sally Rooney) as well as theories of the novel (by critics such as Erich Auerbach, Georg Lukacs, Roland Barthes, Ian Watt, Fredric Jameson, and Catherine Gallagher).

ENGLISH
352 1265 1 4   Jazz and American Literature and Culture from the Civil War to the Present
TextbookTextbook
Wendy Martin Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous This seminar will provide an overview of the complex origins and antecedents of jazz and its impact on American language, cultural values and practices as well as the visual arts, music and literature. We will explore the origin and rich history of the word “Jazz” which was often called “The Devil’s Music” by traditionalists. And we will also trace the trajectory of the many forms of jazz from the Field Songs, Spirituals, Ragtime, and Blues of the American South as well as the melange of musical traditions that flowed through New Orleans and moved up the Mississippi to Chicago, Kansas City, New York and California to become “Swing,” “ Bebop,” “Cool,” “Fusion” and Avant Garde. Works by Mark Twain, Claude McKay and Langston Hughes to William Faulkner, Allen Ginsberg, Toni Morrison, Jamaal May and many others. This seminar fulfills the requirement for American Literature before or after 1900, but not both. It also fulfills a requirement for an elective course in the English Department as well as the American Studies concentration.

ENGLISH
370A 1098 1 4   Great Books? Part I
TextbookTextbook
Eric Bulson Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Blaisdell 7 In-Person It is not a term you hear much nowadays. The so-called "Great-Books course" has been shrouded in controversy since it first arrived in the modern university more than a century ago with compelling arguments on both sides about whether or not the whole idea should even exist. And yet, these courses and the literary works therein persist (even as the number of English majors declines precipitously), and they continue to get mobilized to justify or attack the concept of a general humanities education. "Great" Books is designed as a two-part course—part I from Homer to the Bible in Fall 2022, part, II, from Vergil to Woolf in Spring 2023—but students can, if they must, sign up for one semester only. In addition to providing a wide-angle view of literary history—with a lineup that includes Herodotus, Plato, Aeschylus, Vergil, Augustine, Dante, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Montaigne, Dostoevsky, and Woolf—we will also engage with a variety of critical debates about the history and uncertain future of the Great-Books course.

ENGLISH
400M 1100 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

ENGLISH
404 1099 1 4   Literary Criticism
TextbookTextbook
Eric Bulson Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
IAC Library In-Person What is literary criticism? Where does it come from? Is it different from Theory (Capital "T")? How has literary criticism changed over the course of the twentieth century? And what impact have these changes had on the way we understand not just the practice of reading and interpretation but also the role of the literary critic in the world? These are some of the questions we will be asking in this broad survey of the discipline. Authors will include Matthew Arnold, I.A. Richards, William Empson, Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, György Lukacs, John Crowe Ransom, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, Rita Felski, and Caroline Levine. This course fulfills the Theory Requirement.

ENGLISH
477 1275 1 4   Death and Dying in American Poetry from the Puritans to the Present
TextbookTextbook
Wendy Martin Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous In this course, we will analyze representative American poems from the colonial era to the present moment about death and dying in an effort to determine the ways in which religious and historical/political contexts—including concurrent historical events, shifting economic and social conditions and beliefs about the afterlife as well as resulting changes in funeral and mourning practices — affect both the content and the form of a wide range of poetry. Some of the poets we will read include, among others, Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Phillis Wheatley, Lydia Sigourney, Walt Whitman, Robert Frost, Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, T.S. Eliot, William Carlos Williams, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Joy Harjo, and Patricia Smith. This seminar fulfills the requirement for American Literature before or after 1900, but not both. It also fulfills a requirement for an elective course in the English Department as well as the American Studies concentration.

ENGLISH
499 1101 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EVAL
310 1080 1 4   Theory-Driven Evaluation Science
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Jessica Renger. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. This course provides an in-depth understanding of theory-driven evaluation science, with special emphasis on the foundations of evaluation theory and practice; how to use evaluation, program, and social science theory to improve evaluation practice; how to engage diverse stakeholders in the process of developing logic models and theories of change; and how to design comprehensive, tailored, ethically defensible, and culturally responsive theory-driven evaluations.

EVAL
315 1081 1 4   Evaluation & Applied Research Methods: A Survey of Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Robert Blagg. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. This survey course provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods, research and evaluation design, and applied social science research topics such as sampling, measurement, validity, reliability, and related threats. The course also explores specific data collection strategies, meta-evaluation, communication, and reporting findings.

EVAL
380 1082 1 4   Directed Specialization
TextbookTextbook
Tarek Azzam Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. This course will be custom designed to the student's specific interests. Students will work with a faculty advisor to select and participate in a series of workshops (e.g. CGU summer professional workshop series). The faculty advisor will meet with each student to help guide them in selecting a series of professional development courses that would enhance their knowledge and understanding in their area of specialization. These Professional development courses can be attended online or in-person depending on their availability and timing, students will also report back on their learning as part of the class.

EVAL
400M 1324 1 0   Continuous Registration (MS Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

FINANENG
335 1201 1 4   Corporate Finance
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: TBD This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of financial decision making, including investment decisions, financing decisions, and their interaction. The course provides the students with the underlying framework of corporate finance including valuation, market efficiency, portfolio theory, agency costs, and information costs. The course will relate financial management to the structure of financial institutions in the U.S. In addition, the course includes a survey of special topics in finance including option pricing, mergers and acquisitions, hedging, and international finance.

FINANENG
340 1202 1 4   Financial Engineering Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Michael B. Imerman, . Faculty Mon 5:30PM -
7:20PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Second Instructor: Kenneth Abbott This class will examine important issues and cutting-edge methodologies that are most relevant in the fields of financial engineering and quantitative risk management. The topics will be a customized blend of theoretical ideas and practical applications. These may include: the usage of machine learning and artificial intelligence to financial services and risk management, the impact of liquidity in traditional financial models, advanced credit risk models and dynamic default prediction, bond pricing (PV01 and convexity), quadratic-form VaR, implementation of the Gaussian copula, mean reversion /Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes, and factor models.

FINANENG
499 1369 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

GOVT
263CM 1400 1 4   Ending Slavery: the Democratic Statesmanship of Abraham Lincoln & Frederick Douglass
TextbookTextbook
Christopher Nadon MonWed 8:10AM -
9:25AM
Off campus location In-Person CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ This course will focus on the different ways two anti-slavery statesmen worked to end slavery within the constraints of a democratic society. Readings will be drawn primarily from the speeches and writings of Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and their opponents. Prerequisite: GOVT020 CM.

GOVT
274CM 1406 1 4   Xenophon: Politics, Philosophy & War: Xenophon's Political Philosophy
TextbookTextbook
Christopher Nadon MonWed 11:00AM -
12:15PM
To Be Determined In-Person Xenophon, like Plato, was a student of Socrates. But Xenophon led a more active life, traveling to Persia where he became general of an army of Greek mercenaries. This practical bend is reflected in the Anabasis, describing his adventures in Persia, and the Education of Cyrus, an account of how to conquer the world that earned Machiavelli’s approval. Yet Xenophon also wrote the Memorabilia, a work devoted to a consideration of Socrates and his more contemplative way of life. This class will consist of a close reading of these works with particular attention to the tension between the political and philosophic life.

HISTORY
300 1102 1 4   Introduction to Doing History & to Being an Historian
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Goode Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Blaisdell 7 In-Person L.P. Hartley's line, that the past is a foreign country, is not just a discomfort to historians; it is their founding challenge. This course examines the study of history, its formation and development as a discipline and some of the newest techniques for examining the past. As one of the few required courses in the History department, this class explores not only theories of studying the past (what we can know about the past), but also provides some hands-on experience in working with primary sources. The course is designed to introduce you to the study of history in Claremont, in the United States and in the world. It is a reading- and writing-intensive course in a discussion seminar format, with a short writing assignment and a longer analytical paper as part of the semester’s work.

HISTORY
305 1117 1 4   Modern U.S. History: A Study of Major Works
TextbookTextbook
Joanna Poblete Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Blaisdell 7 In-Person This readings seminar will engage with major works written about Reconstruction through the late twentieth century to provide an introduction to significant time periods, issues, and approaches for major aspects of modern United States history. This course is ideal for students from any discipline looking to develop or build their general knowledge of U.S. history from 1865 to the present, for teaching, research, and/or qualifying exam purposes.

HISTORY
336 1103 1 4   California History through Biography
TextbookTextbook
Romeo Guzman Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person The "California Dream" looms large in the popular imagination. There is no shortage of movies, songs, images, and even scholarly texts, that portray this state as a land of health and wealth. And, yet, California is also a story of colonization, displacement, and removal. Rather than settle this debate, the course uses biography to explore the history of California. This courses is divided into two parts. In the first section, we will read recent biographies about California activists, writers, and politicians. This includes figures like Ricardo Flores Magón, Richard Oakes, and Octavia Butler, among others. In the second section of the course, students will conduct original research to write a biography. This course is ideal for students interested in California or biography.

HISTORY
364A 1104 1 4   Futbol: A Global History of the Beautiful Game
TextbookTextbook
Romeo Guzman Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Despite its ambivalent status in the United States, futbol is widely believed to be the most universal language spoke on the planet. It is spoken more widely than English and practiced more widely than any religion. Every four years, countries from around the world compete for the honor of winning the World Cup. As the 2022 Men’s World Cup approaches, this course will take as its focus the origins, development, and growth of the game in Europe, Africa, the United States, and Latin America. Through futbol, we’ll explore empire and colonization, nation-building and identity, migration and diasporic politics, gender and masculinity, fandom and its discontents, and capitalism and displacement. For the final projects, student will have the option of writing a traditional historiography paper, working with San Gabriel Valley futbol community members to build a new archive of the game, or using Omeka to publish an existing archive. This course is ideal for students interested in sport, transnational, or global history. No experience with or affinity to the game is required.

HISTORY
382 1118 1 4   U.S. Immigration History
TextbookTextbook
Joanna Poblete Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Blaisdell 7 In-Person This course will provide an introduction to the field of U.S. immigration history with an opportunity to write an original research paper. Students will read a variety of seminal and newer texts in immigration history. By the end of this course, students will understand a wide range of immigration experiences in the United States, including internal and coerced migration, learn major theoretical approaches to studying immigration experiences, and write an original research paper on a topic of their choice.

HISTORY
400M 1105 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

HISTORY
408 1092 1 4   Curating Art and Science
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructors: Claudia Bohn-Spector and Peter Sachs Callopy. Class meetings will mostly be held on CGU campus with some meetings at Caltech and some site visits. See department for meeting location and date details. This course is a partnership between CGU School of Arts and Humanities and The California Institute of Technology. The instructors are the lead curators of an exhibition opening in the Fall of 2024 at Caltech that is part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time initiative Art x Science x L.A. Dr. Peter Sachs Collopy, University Archivist and Head of Archives and Special Collections at Caltech, and independent curator Dr. Claudia Bohn-Spector are leading a team of twelve scholars from across the United States, examining Caltech as a vibrant and complex site for scientific image production. Their project spans roughly one hundred years, from 1920 to the present. It explores how images at Caltech were made and used across disciplines and how these images have been harnessed to advance broader socio-cultural and institutional goals. This graduate seminar will explore both the theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of this multi-year curatorial effort. We examine general themes of curating art and science, and will focus specifically on aspects of the Caltech exhibition, constructing curatorial and design exercises that draw on Caltech Archives and other local collections. Students will investigate a range of visual practices at Caltech according to the specific scientific, artistic, and institutional functions they serve. What kinds of information do scientific images convey, and how do we best look at them in their varying contexts? How do we account for the choices scientists make when they represent their research, and what cultural biases/preferences might their images contain? How has photography, especially in its new digital form, changed the way scientists work and present what they find? How do scientific images relate to other Caltech images in art, technology, and popular culture? The course will include a series of guest speakers and field trips across Los Angeles.

HISTORY
409 1264 1 4   History of Greater Mexico
TextbookTextbook
Daniel Ramirez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person The History of Greater Mexico assays a study of our close neighbor with whom the United States has had relations that run the gamut from violence to solidarity, from misunderstanding to respect, and from competition to cooperation. The course will offer a survey over the received periods of Mexican history (Mesoamerica to New Spain to Republic), with an eye toward understanding the diverse and multicultural Mexico of today, including that Mexico represented in its cultural production (fine arts, cinema, literature). While anchored on the historical "center" of Mexico, the survey will consider the several peripheries created by events and actors over time (e.g., colonial expansion into New Mexico, northwestern Jesuit missions, provincial revolts, wars of foreign intervention, etc.), including that significant periphery inhabited by people of Mexican origin in the United States. Of particular interest will be: the nation’s contested evolution through liberal and revolutionary periods of tense and often violent competition between Church and State (laicité); economic modernization; diplomacy and mediation on the world stage (e.g., sanctuary from fascism, nuclear disarmament, Central American war); indigenous Mexico, and immigration to Mexico. Note: the week of November 28 will coincide with the storied annual International Book Fair (FIL) in Guadalajara, Jalisco. That week’s session will be transmitted from there by Zoom, with colleagues from the Universidad de Guadalajara, the Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, and the Colegio de Jalisco participating as speakers. Travel to the FIL will be optional, with no financial or logistical support from Claremont Graduate University. Caution: This course may ruin one’s ideas of Spring Break in Mexico . . . unless the excursion includes book and film festivals, visits to archives, temples and museums, archeological exploration, culinary adventures, and respectful encounter with Mexican letters, culture, and people!

HISTORY
499 1106 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

HRM
300 1083 1 4   Principles of HR Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 7:00PM -
8:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Instructor: Jessica Diaz. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Principles of HR Management is an introductory 4 unit course which explores internal and external issues that influence an organization's decisions and policies affecting its human resources. Critical HR functions will be explored to provide a solid understanding of the many issues confronting the HR professional. (This is a pre requisite course for students with little or no HR work experience.)

HRM
301 1084 1 2 M1 Overview of Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Cecelia Dotzler Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Instructor: Cecelia Dotzler. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. This course helps students understand the ways in which people in organizations are similar to each other and where their thoughts, feelings, and actions are impacted by individual, group or organizational dynamics. Some of the key areas covered include equity, ethics and fairness in the workplace, productive work environments, leadership and communication, decision-making and problem-solving, and power and influence in HR. Through reading and thinking about what the classical and current management theorists have to say, students will grapple with how organizations came to relate to their members the way they do today.

HRM
324 1085 1 2 M1 Global HR & Diversity
TextbookTextbook
Maria Gloria Gonzalez Morales Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Global HR & Diversity covers major cultural differences in values and attitudes which may affect international HRM effectiveness, global staffing, international compensation, employee relations, labor law, and encourages students to identify the future agenda of international HRM for themselves and/or their organizations.

HRM
325 1144 1 2 M2 Compensation, Benefits & Total Rewards
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Ronald Smedley. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. The emphasis for this course will be on the human resource concepts strategies, philosophy, and practices of compensation and benefits administration emphasizing current models, with an examination of “trends”, cost to value, and systems. Insights from 21st century leaders in the field will be explored and discussed to enrich the learning experience. The legal aspects of compensation and benefits will also be shared and discussed from a California, federal and international perspective. Throughout the course, special attention will be given to: 1) the evolving nature of compensation and benefits in today’s recessed economy, 2) the changing expectations of employees, keying in on the Compensation and Benefits – Fall 2015 2 various work-age generations, 3) the competitive needs and challenges for employers today, and 4) the evolving trends in performance and pay realignment to the strategic objectives of the organization. The course provides each student with a hands-on, experiential opportunity to develop the human resource skills necessary to strategize, design and understand a performance-based compensation hands-on, experiential opportunity to develop the human resource skills necessary to strategize, design and understand a performance-based compensation and benefit program workable in a 21st century organization

HRM
342 1141 1 2 M1 Job Analysis, Job Design
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 5:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Instructor: Dana Mayhew. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Job analysis and design present theories, empirical research, laws, and policies relating to the design of jobs, roles and responsibilities, employment practices such as recruitment, selection, and placement, developing and managing performance criteria, skill inventory planning, ergonomics and workplace safety. This course covers popular methods, practical administrative issues, and organizational relationships with relevant stakeholders.

HRM
344 1145 1 2 M2 Performance Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Fri 7:00PM -
9:30PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Jennifer A Jaffe. Class meets Fri 11/11 (7-9:30pm), Sat 11/12 (9am-5pm), Fri 12/2 (7-9:30pm), Sat 12/3 (9am-5pm). Performance Management presents key principles, methods, and techniques for enhancing employee productivity and organizational effectiveness through performance problem analysis, coaching and feedback skills, performance appraisal system design and implementation, and other formal and informal performance management systems are explored.

HRM
346 1146 1 2 M2 Training & Development
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Paola Alvarez. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Training and Development focuses on methods for using training and development within the organization to create more productive organizations. This course covers needs assessments and the design and implementation of training programs to address those needs. Analysis and application of adult learning theories is explored.

HRM
347 1142 1 2 M1 Employee and Labor Relations Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Scott Mazo. The focus of this course it to develop a broad knowledge of Labor Relations issues in today's workplace including history, concepts and laws. The students will gain a practical understanding of Labor Relations including union related and labor relations laws, union membership, union decertification and de-authorization, union - management relations, collective bargaining issues and processes, arbitration and contract negotiations. This course will also provide a basic education in union avoidance practices.

HRM
350P 1143 1 2 M1 Positive Talent Acquisition
TextbookTextbook
Florencio Kabigting Mon 7:00PM -
8:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Using a positive lens, this course provides a combination of evidence-based and best practice approaches to talent acquisition and retention---a key element in an organization's overall Talent Management process. Students will gain theoretical and practical talent acquisition and retention knowledge and skills necessary to support their organization's ability to search, attract, select, hire, and retain human capital to help gain/sustain the organization's competitive advantage through people. At the end of this course, students will be in a better position to find the right talent for the right job by design and not by chance. Elective Course: This course is required for Positive HRM concentration students, but is not a substitute to the "HRM 357: Workforce Planning & Talent Management" requirement for the M.S. in Human Resource Management degree.

HRM
352 1147 1 2 M2 Analytics, Metrics and Measurement
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 7:00PM -
8:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Instructor: TBD. Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. In the knowledge economy, a company’s talent is its competitive advantage. This means that companies have to be more sophisticated than ever when it comes to attracting and retaining the skills and capabilities they require for success. A critical success factor in these dynamic environments is to apply data and analytics in a creative way to achieve goals. In this course, you will learn how you can use data, metrics, and analytics across the employee lifecycle to make proactive people decisions to drive business outcomes, create a place where people love to work, and become a trusted advisor to leadership.

HUM
301 1387 1 2   Early Modern Studies Colloquium
TextbookTextbook
Lori Ferrell  -
To Be Determined In-Person Meeting day/time TBD. See department for details. This course is open to students enrolled in the Early Modern Studies concentration. This course may be repeated for credit.

INST
400M 1375 1 0   Continuous Registration (Master's Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

INST
410 1133 1 4   Political Economy of International Development
TextbookTextbook
Yi Feng Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. This course is about political institutions and economic development. In recent years, there has been a surge of literature on political and economic development, at the very heart of which is the relationship between political systems and economic performance. The rising interest in this topic has resulted from the two grand trends that have, during a course of previous two decades, changed most fundamentally the ways in which billions of people live and work: political democratization and economic liberalization. Economists, political scientists, and sociologists have made this area of study one of the most dynamic and fruitful in the social sciences since the early 1990s. It will remain one of the most important research topics, perhaps, the single most important one in the field of international and comparative political economy, for many years to come; the need to study the relationship between the two kinds of development has never been stronger and the call for explication and elaboration of them has never been more imperative.

INST
430 1132 1 4   Perspectives in Conflict and Peace
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Nicholas Stowell. Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. This class will review current theories of international and domestic conflict including proposals that lead to their resolution. In the first half of the class students will cover alternate perspectives for the initiation, escalation, diffusion and settlement of conflicts. In the second half the discussion will center on papers that propose extensions or new innovative approaches to the field. This course assumes familiarity with basic approaches to the field.

INST
481 1134 1 4   Statistical Methods for Social Sciences
TextbookTextbook
Yi Feng Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. Statistical methods and thinking are among the key languages, mental structures, and methods of the social sciences in general and Policy Analysis in particular. The purpose of this class is to help you understand that language and use those methods. In addition, the purpose of this class is to prepare you for further study in more advanced statistical research methods such as multivariate regression analysis. This class is a basic introduction to statistics. For this class the only math background you require is algebra. An introduction to probability is useful. You are expected to write at the graduate level. This course is a prerequisite for PP482, INST 483, INST 487, PP 487, PP 488, and INST 489. Class is equivalent to PP 481.

INST
499 1370 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

IST
302 1002 1 4   Databases
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Nagla Alnosayan. This course is intended for students to gain a deep understanding of the important concepts and techniques of physical relational database design and a fundamental understanding of the architecture of modern database management systems.

IST
303 1003 1 4   Software Development
TextbookTextbook
Wallace Chipidza Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This class is an introduction to software development using agile methods. Students use a combination of Python 3 and related tools to develop software. The class is practically oriented, with hands-on exercises occupying substantial chunks of class time.

IST
304 1004 1 4   Communications & Networking
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Chinazunwa Uwaoma This is a graduate level course covering TCP/IP Internet communication protocol design, emerging wireless data networking and networked applications. The Internet has become your business e-infrastructure. The success of the Internet and web-based services is bringing new ways of doing business in a global world and is constantly pushing the frontier with several exciting next generation networking technologies and applications. These calls for increased demand on business managers to better understand the networks they manage and Information System professionals to design, implement and operate these advanced networks to provide efficient and reliable services to their users.

IST
314 1005 1 4   Enterprise Systems and Supply Chain Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Itamar Shabtai. Class includes 1-2 hours of weekly asynchronous instruction. This course aims to provide basic knowledge and deep understanding of the contribution of information systems on the strategic and operational levels. It will focus on how to plan and manage efficient business processes to enable digital integration and collaboration between various parts of the supply chain. The course will cover topics such as: SCM (supply chain management), BPR (business processes reengineering), ERP (enterprise resource planning) as well as the whole process of the adoption of the right solution including software selection, in-house vs. cloud platforms, the implementation process and assimilation challenges within the organization. The course will provide the students with hands-on experience by using modern applications (such as: ERP, BPM and SCM) to apply the theoretical models and gain practical knowledge.

IST
321 1006 1 4   Leading Digital Business Transformation
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Sarah Osailan. Class includes 1-2 hours of weekly asynchronous instruction. Successfully incorporating today’s digital technologies enable companies to operate in new ways. The purpose of the course is to amplify students to lead IT-enabled business model transformation in modern organizations. The course position students at the high-point of the IT leadership activity, where goals and priorities to redefine business models are being set. During the course students will experiment a complete digital transformation process, develop digital capabilities and generate value-creation business opportunities.

IST
322 1007 1 4   Technological Innovation & Entrepreneurship
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Instructor: Xuesong Zhang. Class meets in person on 8/31, 10/23, and 12/7, otherwise online. Students will learn current technological innovation and key business strategies for Internet entrepreneurs. Topics include: Innovation theories, Big data innovation, Online business archetypes, Startup heuristics, Competitive analysis and strategies, Lean methodology, Product management, User Experience, Leadership, Outsourcing, Search Engine Optimization, Internet marketing, Incorporating and Funding. Activities include: lectures, discussions, case studies, research essays, projects and presentations.

IST
330 1018 1 1 - 4   Supervised Professional Practice in IS&T
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Supervision Instructor: TBD The goal of the supervised professional practice course is to enrich students' educational training in information systems and technology fields by providing an opportunity to apply theory and skills acquired from their classes to a professional setting. Students contribute to an organization or company’s resources and to specific projects while developing personal confidence and leadership as an IS&T professional.

IST
332 1325 1 4   Natural Language Processing
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Jeffrey Harwell Natural language is all around us: we speak and write to communicate, to transfer information, and to save knowledge. Natural Language Processing (NLP) is especially useful in information systems and technology because most of our advanced systems include some form of natural language. In this class, students will be introduced to NLP, available resources (lexicons, ontologies, etc) and tools (parsers, open source software). This is a hands-on class where we study cutting-edge techniques and apply these to current problems in different domains. Prerequisite: Ability to program, however, the use of open source software will be encouraged.

IST
342 1008 1 4   Managing Data at Scale
TextbookTextbook
Yan Li Tue 1:15PM -
4:00PM
To Be Determined In-Person In this course, we explore how to generate, collect, process, store, manage, analyze, and interpret data. We will examine: the importance of data strategies, data governance and data quality, challenges associated with data protection, privacy and security, and modern data architecture and platforms to streamline data operations within an organization. We will also introduce the emergent issues around data ethics and how to mitigate information risks. Basic knowledge of databases is recommended to take this course.

IST
343 1381 2 4   Data Science Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Yan Li Fri 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person In this course, we provide a team-based learning experience for students to apply important concepts, models, processes, and techniques of analytics for modern organizations. The students will work on real-world data science problems with industry sponsors.

IST
344 1010 1 4   Data Analytics and Information Visualization
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Nagla Alnosayan The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity for gaining a deep understanding of the important principles and techniques for translating organizational data into visual stories that can be used by managers to make data-driven decisions. It also provides students with the opportunity to gain practical experience in building a business intelligence application that starts from business requirements elicitation, to data preparation, to visual presentation. Main topics of this course include basic concepts of information visualization, best practices for data extraction, transformation, and loading process, fundamentals of data preparation and understanding, principles of dashboard design, and an overview of predictive analytics.

IST
353 1011 1 4   Cyber-security Practicum
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Sync Intructor: Chinazunwa Uwaoma. In person meetings 11/22-12/13, otherwise online. This cyber -security practicum provides students with an opportunity to research and rethink cyber security by integrating and applying perspectives and trends in several topic categories. Students will select a topic about which they do have genuine interest and will be required to submit three research essays and a final presentation. Depending on the topic selected, students will be given practical exercises to extend their learning.

IST
354 1398 2 4   Fundamentals of Cyber Security
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 2:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Itamar Shabtai. Class includes an hour of required online asynchronous instruction. The digital transformation that touches all business sectors and every aspect of our life creates new challenges and threats. Cyber security is one of them. This course aim at providing a deep understanding of the strategies, technologies, processes, and practices to protect data, computers, networks and applications. Students will gain broad understanding of vulnerabilities and attacks techniques and strategies and how to prevent from cyber-attacks. The course will cover various topics including critical cyber threats, types of malwares, cyber security breaches and types of cyber-attacks. Students will learn how to design and develop prevention and defense strategies and methods to ensure security of data and networks across the organization. It is an applied course that combine theoretical aspects together with real life examples, case studies and a project to design a plan to secure the information technology infrastructure of a company.

IST
370 1012 1 4   Introduction to GIS Analytics and Solution Development
TextbookTextbook
Brian Hilton Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This course provides an overview of the theoretical foundations and the applied use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

IST
377A 1013 1 4   GIS Special Topics: GIS for Data Science
TextbookTextbook
Brian Hilton Sat 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Topics include - Python and R for Spatial Analytics, Mapping, and Machine Learning; Data Science Using ArcGIS Online and Insights for ArcGIS; GeoAI: Advanced Data Science Using ArcGIS Pro, ArcGIS Enterprise, and the Azure Platform

IST
400M 1014 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

IST
499 1015 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree. During the semester students will generally work on: * Research methodology study and deployment * Experiment Design * Questionnaires Design * Experiment system development * Data collection and analysis

IST
501A 1016 1 4   Introduction to IS&T Research
TextbookTextbook
Wallace Chipidza Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Sync Introduces new doctoral students to the nature of doctoral studies. Introduces the student to conceptual foundations for information science research past and current research areas and researchers in the discipline. The student learns about writing the doctoral dissertation and develops a preliminary research topic analysis.

IST
505 1017 1 4   Design Research: Seminar
TextbookTextbook
Samir Chatterjee Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person The course develops skills for implementing and evaluating the techniques and methods that are used in the various phases of design research. After an exposure to the characteristics that differentiate design research from other types of research, research methods and techniques used in the various phases of such research will be discussed in the context of exemplars of such research. The exemplars will be from a number of information systems areas such as software engineering, networking, Internet technologies, information security, telemedicine, middleware, multimedia and others.

LEAD
305A 1239 1 2   Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Blended Class begins before start of term. Class meets in-person (7-10pm) on Fri 8/26, 9/16, 10/7, 11/4, 12/2, plus class includes an additional 3 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity on 9/28 and 11/16. Must be leadership student to enroll. This course emphasizes the leadership essential, self-awareness. Through lab-like simulations, in-class exercises, and reflection assignments you will develop self-awareness about your inner world (how you perceive, how you feel, what you value) and about how you show up in the external world as a leader (how others perceive you, what strengths you exhibit, what skills need development).

LEAD
310 1240 1 2 M1 Organizational Culture and Design
TextbookTextbook
Michelle Bligh Wed 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Blended Class meets online Wed 9/7 (7-9pm), in-person Sat 9/17 & 10/8 (9am-4pm), and includes 3 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity on Wed 9/7, 9/14. 9/21. Non-leadership students may request enrollment through dept. consent. $35 fee applies to cover cost of catered lunches for Saturday meetings on campus. This course focuses on how organizational culture is defined, developed, and changed, with particular emphasis on the role of leaders in shaping organizational culture. We will identify the elements that comprise an organization’s culture and their impact on working styles, understand the complexities and paradoxes involved in climate creation, and gain knowledge of climate change levers and how to pull them to effectively. We will also look at cultural artifacts such as language, metaphors, rites and ceremonies, stories and myths, symbols, dress, history and heroes. Activities will include group work, video-based discussions, cases, presentations, and other experiential activities.

LEAD
330 1241 1 2 M2 Diversity and Team Leadership
TextbookTextbook
Maria Gloria Gonzalez Morales Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Blended Class meets online Wed 9/7 (7-9pm), in-person Sat 9/17 & 10/8 (9am-4pm), and includes 3 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity on Wed 9/7, 9/14. 9/21. Non-leadership students may request enrollment through dept. consent. $35 fee applies to cover cost of catered lunches for Saturday meetings. This course is designed to provide concepts, tools and strategies to create, promote and manage diverse and inclusive organizations and groups. In order to achieve both individual and collective belonging, we will target competences needed to apply integrative approaches that resolve the tension between diversity values and team functioning. For example, we will work on skills and tools that allow leaders to recognize and utilize the value of uniqueness, communicate across differences and navigate the complex circumstances in order to enhance cohesion and coordination, and promote team trust and efficacy.

MATH
231CM 1062 1 4   Math Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Asuman Aksoy MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed In-Person CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Countable sets, least upper bounds, and metric space topology including compactness, completeness, connectivity, and uniform convergence. Related topics as time permits.

MATH
231HM 1276 1 4   Mathematical Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Heather Brooks MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed In-Person HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Countable sets, least upper bounds, and metric space topology including compactness, completeness, connectivity, and uniform convergence. Related topics as time permits.

MATH
231PO 1066 1 4   Principles of Real Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Konrad Aguilar TueThu 8:10AM -
9:25AM
No Room Needed In-Person Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Countable sets, least upper bounds, and metric space topology including compactness, completeness, connectivity, and uniform convergence. Related topics as time permits.

MATH
232HM 1279 1 4   Mathematical Analysis II
TextbookTextbook
Francis Su MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed In-Person HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ A rigorous study of calculus in Euclidean Spaces including multiple Riemann Integrals, derivatives of transformations, and the inverse function theorem. Prerequisite: Mathematics 231. (classified as MATH 132HM at HMC) Riemann integration and Lebesgue integration. Differential topology treatment of integration on manifolds. Student will give presentations on topics such as the Radon-Nykodim theorem, Stone-Weierstrass theorem, and Arzela-Ascoli theorem. Intended to prepare students for Math 338.

MATH
235SC 1392 1 4   Complex Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Chris Towse MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
Off campus location In-Person Scripps class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ The beautiful and elegant theorems which are encountered in complex analysis form a cornerstone of mathematics. In this course we will apply familiar concepts such as line integrals and differentiability to complex-valued functions. We will investigate the Cauchy- Riemann equations, and study holomorphic and meromorphic functions via Taylor and Laurent series. Cauchy’s theorem and integral formula along with the calculus of residues will be featured. We will also introduce conformal mappings and harmonic functions. And the prerequisites are pretty much the same. Required: Linear Algebra (Math 60), recommended: Math 101 or Math 131 (231).

MATH
251CM 1304 1 4   Probability
TextbookTextbook
Sarah Cannon MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
Off campus location In-Person CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ The main elements of probability theory at an intermediate level. Topics include combinatorial analysis, conditional probabilities, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, central limit theorem, and numerous applications. Students may not receive credit for both Math 251 and Math 257.

MATH
251PO 1068 1 4   Probability
TextbookTextbook
Ami Radunskaya MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed In-Person Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ The main elements of probability theory at an intermediate level. Topics include combinatorial analysis, conditional probabilities, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, central limit theorem, and numerous applications. Students may not receive credit for both Math 251 and Math 257.

MATH
252 1281 1 4   Applied Probability and Statistical Theory
TextbookTextbook
John Angus Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person See Math department for registration permission number. Review of Random Variables, Distributions, Joint Distributions, Functions of Random Variables, Convergence Modes and Limiting Distributions, Statistics and Sampling Distributions, Point Estimation, Sufficiency and Completeness, Interval Estimation, Tests of Hypothesis. The pace will be rapid, covering roughly a chapter per week.

MATH
252CM 1065 1 4   Statistical Inference
TextbookTextbook
Bhaven Mistry TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
No Room Needed In-Person CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Introduction to statistical inference. Sufficiency, estimation of parameters, confidence intervals, and tests of hypotheses.

MATH
252PO 1069 1 4   Statistical Theory
TextbookTextbook
Johanna Hardin TueThu 9:35AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed In-Person Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ This course will cover in depth the mathematics behind most of the frequently used statistical tools such as point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, goodness of fit, ANOVA, linear regression. This is a theoretical course, but we will also be using R statistical package to gain some hands on experience with data

MATH
254PO 1070 1 4   Computational Statistics
TextbookTextbook
Gabriel Chandler TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
No Room Needed In-Person Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ An introduction to computationally intensive statistical techniques. Topics may include: random variable generation, Markov Chain Monte Carlo, tree based methods (CART, random forests), kernel based techniques (support vector machines), optimization, other classification, clustering & network analysis, the bootstrap, dimension reduction techniques, LASSO, and the analysis of large data sets. Theory and applications are both highlighted. Algorithms will be implemented using statistical software.

MATH
258HM 1272 1 4   Statistical Linear Models
TextbookTextbook
Talithia D Williams MonWed 9:15AM -
10:30AM
No Room Needed In-Person HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Statistical Linear Models. An introduction to analysis of variance (including one-way and two-way fixed effects ANOVA) and linear regression (including simple linear regression, multiple regression, variable selection, stepwise regression and analysis of residual plots). Emphasis will be on both methods and applications to data. Statistical software will be used to analyze data.

MATH
265HM 1274 1 4   Numerical Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Johanna Hardin MonWed 11:00AM -
12:15PM
No Room Needed In-Person HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ An introduction to the theory and methods for numerical solution of mathematical problems. Core topics include: analysis of error and efficiency of methods; solutions of linear systems by Gaussian elimination and iterative methods; calculation of eigenvalue and eigenvectors; interpolation and approximation; numerical integration; solution of ordinary differential equations.

MATH
271CM 1064 1 4   Abstract Algebra I
TextbookTextbook
Leonid Fukshansky TueThu 9:35AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed In-Person CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Groups, rings, fields and additional topics. Topics in group theory include groups, subgroups, quotient groups, Lagrange's theorem, symmetry groups, and the isomorphism theorems. Topics in Ring theory include Euclidean domains, PIDs, UFDs, fields, polynomial rings, ideal theory, and the isomorphism theorems. In recent years, additional topics have included the Sylow theorems, group actions, modules, representations, and introductory category theory

MATH
271HM 1278 1 4   Abstract Algebra I
TextbookTextbook
Michael Orrison TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed In-Person HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Groups, rings, fields and additional topics. Topics in group theory include groups, subgroups, quotient groups, Lagrange's theorem, symmetry groups, and the isomorphism theorems. Topics in Ring theory include Euclidean domains, PIDs, UFDs, fields, polynomial rings, ideal theory, and the isomorphism theorems. In recent years, additional topics have included the Sylow theorems, group actions, modules, representations, and introductory category theory.

MATH
273PO 1071 1 4   Advanced Linear Algebra
TextbookTextbook
Stephan Garcia TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed In-Person Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Topics may include approximation in inner product spaces, similarity, the spectral theorem, Jordan canonical form, the Cayley Hamilton Theorem, polar and singular value decomposition, Markov processes, behavior of systems of equations..

MATH
274PO 1072 1 4   Abstract Algebra II: Representation Theory
TextbookTextbook
Gizem Karaali WedFri 11:00AM -
12:15PM
No Room Needed In-Person Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Topics covered will include group rings, characters, orthogonality relations, induced representations, application of representation theory, and other select topics from module theory. Prerequisite: Math 271. This course is independent of Math 272 (Abstract Algebra II: Galois Theory), and students may receive credit for both courses.

MATH
280HM 1273 1 4   Introduction to Partial Differential Equations
TextbookTextbook
Heather Brooks MonWed 9:35AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed In-Person HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Classifying PDEs, the method of characteristics, the heat equation, wave equation, and Laplace's equation, separation of variables, Fourier series and other orthogonal expansions, convergence of orthogonal expansions, well-posed problems, existence and uniqueness of solutions, maximum principles and energy methods, Sturm-Liouville theory, Fourier transform methods and Green's functions, Bessel functions. Prerequisites: Differential equations course and Math 231, or permission of instructor.

MATH
287HM 1277 1 4   Deterministic Methods in Operations Research
TextbookTextbook
Susan Martonosi TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed In-Person HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Linear, integer, non-linear and dynamic programming, classical optimization problems, and network theory.

MATH
293 1053 1 4   Mathematics Clinic
TextbookTextbook
Allon Percus Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person Permission numbers required for registration. See department for details. The Mathematics Clinic provides applied, real-world research experience. A team of 3-5 students will work on an open-ended research problem from an industrial partner, under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Problems involve a wide array of techniques from mathematical modeling as well as from engineering and computer science. Clinic projects generally address problems of sufficient magnitude and complexity that their analysis, solution and exposition require a significant team effort. Students are normally expected to enroll in Math 393 (Advanced Mathematics Clinic) in the subsequent semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

MATH
294 1054 1 4   Methods of Applied Mathematics
TextbookTextbook
Ali Nadim Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person Applications of linear algebra and differential equations in modeling. Concepts such as vector spaces, solvability of linear systems, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, singular value decomposition, matrix norms, matrix exponentials, solution of ODEs, nonlinear dynamical systems, bifurcations, phase-plane analysis, stability of fixed points, and Floquet theory are reviewed. They are illustrated through examples such as Leslie population models, Google’s PageRank algorithm, Markov chains, image compression, population dynamics, linear and nonlinear oscillators, predator-prey models, spread of epidemics, enzyme kinetics, gene/protein regulatory networks and the like. Familiarity with undergraduate level differential equations and linear algebra will be helpful.

MATH
306 1055 1 4   Optimization
TextbookTextbook
Marina Chugunova Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person This course concentrates on recognizing and solving convex optimization problems that arise in applications. The course material covers: convex sets, functions, and optimization problems; basics of convex analysis: least-squares, linear and quadratic programs, semidefinite programming, minimax, extremal volume; optimality conditions, duality theory, theorems of alternative, interior-point methods; applications to statistics, machine learning, and finance. This course should benefit anyone who uses or will use scientific computing or numerical optimization in computational mathematics or engineering (e.g., machine learning, financial engineering).

MATH
337PO 1067 1 4   Real & Functional Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Konrad Aguilar TueThu 9:35AM -
10:50AM
Off campus location In-Person Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ Abstract measures, Lebesgue measure on Rn, and Lebesgue-Stieljes measures on R. The Lebesgue integral and limit theorems. Product measures and the Fubini theorem. Additional related topics as time permits. Prerequisite: Math 131 and Math 132. (Formerly Math 331)

MATH
355 1056 1 4   Linear Statistical Models
TextbookTextbook
John Angus Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person See Math department for registration permission number. A discussion of linear statistical models in both the full and less-than-full rank cases, the Gauss-Markov theorem, and applications to regression analysis, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. Topics in design of experiments and multivariate analysis. Prerequisite: linear algebra and a year course in probability and statistics.

MATH
358 1057 1 4   Mathematical Finance
TextbookTextbook
Henry Schellhorn Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This class will cover the theory of option pricing, emphasizing the Black-Scholes model and interest rate models. Implementation of the theory and model calibration are covered in the companion class, Numerical Methods for Finance, Math 361. We will see the binomial no-arbitrage pricing model, state prices, Brownian motion, stochastic integration, and Ito’s lemma, the Black-Scholes equation, risk-neutral pricing and Girsanov theorem, change of numeraire and two term structure models: Vasicek and LIBOR. Prerequisites: Mature understanding of advanced calculus and probability (at the level of Math 251) and permission of instructor. Math 256 would be helpful.

MATH
364 1302 1 4   Machine Learning for Asset Pricing
TextbookTextbook
Henry Schellhorn Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Teaching a course on how to beat the market is an elusive endeavor. Techniques that work robustly (if they exist) are kept confidential. There has however been a spate of advances in deep learning that exploit the most fruitful concept that finance theory invented: arbitrage between different financial instruments. This class focusses on understanding these methods, when applied to simple instruments (stocks and bonds), whereas the mathematical finance class (MATH 358) covers financial options and stochastic calculus. The class is composed of 4 parts: optimization, machine learning, asset pricing theory, and deep learning for asset pricing. The weekly homework will be composed of a mix of mathematical questions, (short) computational problems, and more verbal questions, based on the book by Andrew Ang (Asset Management). Indeed, an important skill for an asset manager is the ability to explain results to a lay audience. We will also cover more traditional methods, such as mean-variance, mean-variance with learning (Black-Litterman), linear factor models, linear programming, PCA, and clustering. If time allows, we will study high-frequency trading. All models will be in discrete time, so no stochastic calculus is required. Background Preparation (Prerequisites): Linear algebra, probability, and knowledge of partial derivatives at the level needed for optimization (i.e., calculus III without Stokes’ theorem).

MATH
368 1058 1 4   Numerical Methods for Matrix Computations
TextbookTextbook
Qidi Peng Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person This course is an in-depth study of numerical linear algebra and the matrix computations that arise in solving linear systems, least-squares problems, and eigenvalue problems for both dense and sparse matrices. It will cover many of the fundamental algorithms such as LU decomposition, Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel and SOR iterations, Krylov subspace methods (e.g., Conjugate Gradient and GMRES), QR and SVD factorization of matrices, eigenvalue problems via power, inverse, and Arnoldi iterations. It will also introduce condition numbers and error analysis, forward and backward stability, constrained and unconstrained optimization problems. The course is designed for those who wish to use matrix computations in their own research. A background in linear algebra and some computational skills (e.g., MATLAB, Python or C) are assumed.

MATH
389E 1059 1 4   Topics in Discrete Optimization
TextbookTextbook
Leonid Fukshansky Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person This course will focus on several classical discrete optimization problems and spend a part of the semester on each of them. The specific problems considered may include the integer knapsack problem, the Frobenius problem, the main problem of coding theory, optimization problems on lattices, and coherence minimization of Euclidean frames. These problems have many features in common, in particular all of them have geometric interpretation as well as applications in digital communications. The goal of this course would be to give an introduction to these deep problems, to discuss their unified geometric framework, and to indicate some applications. The prerequisites for this course include in-depth knowledge of linear algebra, as well as general familiarity with real analysis and abstract algebra.

MATH
400M 1376 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

MATH
458A 1060 1 2 M2 Quantitative Risk Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Nick Costanzino This course will focus on the calculation of Value-at-Risk, risk theory, and extreme value theory. We will also study coherent measures of risk, the Basle accords, and, if time allows, the role of BIS. There will be a practical assignment with data coming from Riskmetrics. We will discuss practical issues following the 2008-2009 financial crisis. Prerequisite: Math 256 & knowledge of derivatives.

MATH
499 1061 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

MGT
306 1203 1 4   Business Analytics
TextbookTextbook
Gary Gaukler Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This course is designed to provide an introduction to statistical methods useful for analyzing data, with specific application to problems of business and economics. At the end of the class, students will have an understanding of uncertainty and risk management, estimation and forecasting, optimization, and the logic of statistical inference. Students will also be expected to learn how to use statistics to think critically about real world issues. Statistical methodology and theory will be presented in an applications context. Ultimately, the goal is to provide students with quantitative tools that can be used in the areas of economics, marketing, financial and managerial accounting, corporate finance, and applied operational methods.

MGT
306 1204 2 4   Business Analytics
TextbookTextbook
Gary Gaukler Mon 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of required online asynchronous instruction. This course is designed to provide an introduction to statistical methods useful for analyzing data, with specific application to problems of business and economics. At the end of the class, students will have an understanding of uncertainty and risk management, estimation and forecasting, optimization, and the logic of statistical inference. Students will also be expected to learn how to use statistics to think critically about real world issues. Statistical methodology and theory will be presented in an applications context. Ultimately, the goal is to provide students with quantitative tools that can be used in the areas of economics, marketing, financial and managerial accounting, corporate finance, and applied operational methods.

MGT
321A 1231 1 2 M1 Marketing Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Haakon Brown This course introduces marketing and its role within organizations. It introduces the marketing concept, examines its relationship to other functions in the firm and looks at techniques and frameworks used to examine marketing environments, understand consumer and organizational buying behavior, segment markets and position products.

MGT
321A 1232 2 2 M1 Marketing Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Kent Drummond This course introduces marketing and its role within organizations. It introduces the marketing concept, examines its relationship to other functions in the firm and looks at techniques and frameworks used to examine marketing environments, understand consumer and organizational buying behavior, segment markets and position products.

MGT
321B 1234 1 2 M2 Marketing Management II
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Haakon Brown This course examines how the Marketing Manager develops the appropriate marketing strategy to meet the needs of his/her target market. It involves a strategic combination of factors such as price, promotion, place (distribution) and promotion. Not all strategies work for all target markets and this course helps you understand how to match strategy with the relevant consumer target market.

MGT
321B 1235 2 2 M2 Marketing Management II
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Kent Drummond This course examines how the Marketing Manager develops the appropriate marketing strategy to meet the needs of his/her target market. It involves a strategic combination of factors such as price, promotion, place (distribution) and promotion. Not all strategies work for all target markets and this course helps you understand how to match strategy with the relevant consumer target market.

MGT
324 1205 1 4   Marketing Research
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: Tarique Hossain The aim of this course is to introduce students to the design and implementation of marketing research. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate choice and design of marketing research, methodologies and interpretation, use and dissemination of marketing information. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches are addressed. By the end of the course, students should be able to: (1) understand each stage of the marketing research process; (2) appreciate different qualitative and quantitative approaches to conducting marketing research; (3) be able to construct a survey and analyze survey data; and (4) be able to ascertain the quality of any research proposal or completed study they might be presented with. Emphasis will be placed upon establishing the usefulness of the research to aid managerial decision-making.

MGT
325 1206 1 2 M1 Finding Clarity: For Critical Career Issues
TextbookTextbook
Jeremy Hunter, Vijay Sathe Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Class meets during all of Module 1 and additionally on 10/24. This 2 unit course will teach you the intellectual and emotional skills needed to be productive and happy in your job -- and in your career, as it progresses from one job to the next. These skills include: how to identify jobs and organizations in which you are likely to flourish, how to avoid recruiting traps and traps that await you in any new job, how to gain credibility in the organization, and how to boost your job performance, job satisfaction, happiness at work, and professional growth.

MGT
325 1207 2 2 M1 Finding Clarity: For Critical Career Issues
TextbookTextbook
Jeremy Hunter, Vijay Sathe Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This 2 unit course will teach you the intellectual and emotional skills needed to be productive and happy in your job -- and in your career, as it progresses from one job to the next. These skills include: how to identify jobs and organizations in which you are likely to flourish, how to avoid recruiting traps and traps that await you in any new job, how to gain credibility in the organization, and how to boost your job performance, job satisfaction, happiness at work, and professional growth.

MGT
326 1208 1 2 M2 Financial Accounting
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Robert Reich The goal of this course is to enable the student to appreciate and understand financial accounting-the language of business-from the perspective of the user/manager. By the end of the course, the student will understand the basic rules governing the preparation of financial statements, the flexibility that exists within these rules, possible incentives for management to make choices from within these rules, and the output from this environment.

MGT
326 1209 2 2 M2 Financial Accounting
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Robert Reich The goal of this course is to enable the student to appreciate and understand financial accounting-the language of business-from the perspective of the user/manager. By the end of the course, the student will understand the basic rules governing the preparation of financial statements, the flexibility that exists within these rules, possible incentives for management to make choices from within these rules, and the output from this environment.

MGT
332 1210 1 2 - 4   Fin Tech
TextbookTextbook
Michael B. Imerman Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This course will provide an introduction to and overview of the increasingly important intersection of financial services and technological innovation, known as "FinTech". Each week will provide a glimpse into the different functional areas within the FinTech ecosystem including: payments technologies, mobile/online banking, robo-advisors and automated wealth management services, technology-enabled lending platforms including peer-to-peer (P2P) lending, etc. The class will also examine some of the new risks that are emerging from the collision of the regulated world of finance finance and the largely unregulated world of technology. Each lesson will include mini case studies and examples to illustrate the technological innovations that have arisen in the functional areas within the FinTech ecosystem, with an emphasis on making the distinction between disruptive versus sustaining innovations in financial services.

MGT
340 1211 1 4   Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Hideki Yamawaki Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person The focus of this course is on how general managers enhance and sustain business performance. The course covers analytical and conceptual tools that are aids to the development of decision. Its fundamental focus, however, is not on tools but on sharpening skills at developing robust judgments in the face of uncertainty and complexity. The central concept of this course is that of strategy. Strategy is enabled and constrained by the underlying economic and political conditions that prevail in an industry or a country, as well as by the resources available to management.

MGT
341 1212 1 2 M2 Design Thinking
TextbookTextbook
Hideki Yamawaki Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous As individuals and organizations operate in an increasingly complex and dynamic environment, exploiting existing opportunities is no longer enough to compete and survive. Many creative organizations are taking a new approach, looking to create new options that may not yet exist in the current landscape. Design Thinking is an approach that uses the principles and techniques that would be used by a designer to create something new. This course teaches students that process, while also connecting it to traditional models of strategy development including competitive positioning/re-positioning and Blue Ocean strategy. Used together, they provide a unique and formidable toolset for any kind of organizational or entrepreneurial endeavors.

MGT
342 1213 1 2 M1 Creativity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship
TextbookTextbook
Vijay Sathe Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous This course is for Drucker MBA students who are interested not only in "the creative industries" but also in "the creative economy" more broadly conceived, and who want to understand how creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship can create value in the "creative industries," in other industries, and in society at large.

MGT
353 1214 1 4   7 Steps to Startup: From Idea to Prototype
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Kristine Kawamura This entrepreneurship course guides participants through a fast-start approach to taking a startup from concept to launch. Those wanting to take the course will submit an initial idea for launching an entrepreneurial venture and follow a method to moving it substantially closer to launch.

MGT
354 1230 1 2 M2 Peter Drucker on Client Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Jorge Sa This course examines Peter Drucker’s writing and ideas on managing clients and entrepreneurship. It examines how to define the client, what the value is for the client, and identifying opportunities using the ANETSA method.

MGT
357 1215 1 2 M1 Managing Client Relations and Customer Experience Management
TextbookTextbook
Bernard J Jaworski Sat 9:00AM -
4:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Blended Class meets Sat 9/24 and 10/15 from 9am-5pm and includes an additional 7 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the art and science of developing, nurturing and sustaining client relationships. While this course is biased toward those in professional services firms, the development of clients extends to any firms that have direct sales forces or face-to-face, client development activities. At first glance, this may seem like a straightforward activity, namely, the selling of products/services into a targeted client organization. However, there is a major difference between client advisors who are “average” and those who are “expert” practitioners. This course is designed to surface the “tradecraft” of individuals who have deep substantive knowledge, high integrity, and a gift in developing trusted client relationships. In effect, these are the “rainmaker” practitioners.

MGT
363 1216 1 2 M2 Cross Cultural Leadership
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Sync Instructor: Kristine Kawamura. Class meets in-person (9am-4pm) Sat 11/12 & 12/10, and online (7-10pm) Thurs 11/03, 11/17, 12/1. This academically-rich, experiential, and collaborative course examines what constitutes effective leadership across cultures that comprise our global marketplace as well as our culturally-complex cities, communities, nations, and regions (including the Los Angeles/Southern California business environment). Students will learn and analyze how national/social cultural context affects leadership style, communications, conflict negotiation, and ethical decision making; examine the need for and value of cross cultural competence for leaders and organizations; apply theories, models, and personal experiences to real-world leadership scenarios; and develop as cross cultural leaders. This will be accomplished through a rich medley of in-class and in-the field activities and both individual- and team-based work.

MGT
368 1217 1 2 M1 Women in Leadership
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Sat 9:00AM -
4:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Blended Class meets Sat 10/1 and 10/22 from 9am-5pm and includes an additional 7 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity. The aim of this course is to provide information and insights to students interested in the intersection of gender, management, and (business) organizations. The emphasis is not on teaching women how to be effective since there are no clear-cut ways to do this. Rather the course takes the approach that both women and men are more effective professionals and leaders when they understand the historical and current dynamics of gender in organizations. While women have made great strides towards equality, many aspects of professional life continue to reflect gendered outcomes and experiences. This course examines the underlying dynamics that shape these outcomes and experiences. Topics include power and influence, negotiation, work-life challenges and social expectations, and leadership. Through case discussions and exposure to current research findings, students will learn how to analyze and make sense of gendered dynamics in the business world and beyond. A secondary objective of the course is to allow students to reflect on their own experiences; to provoke them to think about their own assumptions and to help them develop their own perspective and leadership style. The purpose is not to provide students with a set of clear-cut tactics, but rather to expose them to the issues related to women in business and provide a basis for them to be aware, thoughtful, and confident members of organizations. Finally, this course is a collaborative endeavor. We have the opportunity to learn a tremendous amount from each other and to develop a collaboration that will carry on over years beyond the end of the course. The course is open to women and men and will benefit from all types of diversity.

MGT
373 1218 1 4   Financial Strategy and Valuation
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Victor Dosti This course will investigate the key financial choices of a corporation and their impact on the overall strategy of the firm. Payout policy (dividends and share repurchases) will be one of the topics covered in this course. We will then study the securities issuance decision of the firm, including intitial and secondary public offerings (IPOs and SEOs). Value creation and mergers & acquisitions will be another topic we will investigate. Finally, we will examine corporate governance policies as they pertain to the overall strategy of the firm.

MGT
375 1219 1 2 M1 Global Supply Chain Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: TBD. Class includes an additional 7 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity. Supply Chain Management provides the foundation for the success of a corporation. The evolution of the role of logistics in commerce, has created dependency, sub-disciplines of study and opportunities to analyze the direct impact in various industries and sectors. Growth trends, combine the need for logistical efficiency, with environmental factors, strategic positioning, laws and policy adherence, and cost maintenance. The understanding, analysis and optimization of logistical components is fundamental to the growth and progression of corporations globally.

MGT
376 1229 1 2 M2 Sustainability and Logistics
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Instructor: TBD. Class includes an additional 7 hours of online asynchronous instructional activity. This course considers how to manage logistics effectively and the relationship of sustainability to logistics in contemporary supply chains.

MGT
380 1220 1 2 M1 Drucker Philosophy
TextbookTextbook
Bernard J Jaworski MonThu 9:00AM -
4:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Class begins before start of term. Class meets 9am-5pm on Mon 8/22, Thurs 8/25, and Sat 9/10. This course focuses on self-management, professionalization, written communication, and critical thinking

MGT
380A 1236 1 1   Create Your Future
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Kristine Kawamura. Class meets 9/13, 10/11, 11/8, 12/6 only Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
380A 1237 2 1   Create Your Future
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Kristine Kawamura. Class meets 9/13, 10/11, 11/8, 12/6 only Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
380A 1238 3 1   Create Your Future
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Kristine Kawamura. Class meets 9/14, 10/12, 11/9, 12/7 only. Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
383 1221 1 2 M1 Economics of Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Wed 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. This class uses the business-related tenets of economics (old and new) to generate a modern, consistent, formal framework for strategic decision-making. Using economic intuition we will be able to address issues ranging from outsourcing to new product lines. We will be able to explain why some firms actively compete through price changes while others, in apparently similar competitive industries, do not. Economic theories seem very abstract to many students because these theories usually assume many unrealistic things about people and society. Students must be mindful of the fact that these assumptions are what allow economists to answer many otherwise intractable questions. The results that we attain usually hold even without these simplifying assumptions. This class will show how some of these economic models can provide a powerful, formal framework for answering managerial questions ranging from dealing with competition to setting proper incentives for managers.

MGT
383 1222 2 2 M1 Economics of Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This class uses the business-related tenets of economics (old and new) to generate a modern, consistent, formal framework for strategic decision-making. Using economic intuition we will be able to address issues ranging from outsourcing to new product lines. We will be able to explain why some firms actively compete through price changes while others, in apparently similar competitive industries, do not. Economic theories seem very abstract to many students because these theories usually assume many unrealistic things about people and society. Students must be mindful of the fact that these assumptions are what allow economists to answer many otherwise intractable questions. The results that we attain usually hold even without these simplifying assumptions. This class will show how some of these economic models can provide a powerful, formal framework for answering managerial questions ranging from dealing with competition to setting proper incentives for managers.

MGT
391 1223 1 2 M1 Introduction to Risk Management
TextbookTextbook
Michael B. Imerman Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person The course will provide a comprehensive introduction to risk management from the perspective of both financial and non-financial institutions. It covers the design and operation of a risk-management system, the technical modeling within that system, and the interplay between the internal oversight and the external regulatory components of the system.

MGT
400M 1377 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

MGT
475 1224 1 4   Selected Topics in Finance: Fixed Income & Other Investments
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This class will discuss the pricing theories, investing concepts and institutions of bonds and related interest-rate instruments. We will discuss a broad range of financial instruments including corporate debt, municipal debt, CDO’s, and interest rate derivatives (options, futures, swaps, etc.) We will also discuss bond portfolio management and related issues such as immunization. An entire semester discussing and valuing bonds might seem like overkill, especially when one considers how little attention the financial press pays to the bond market. Investing, portfolios and brokers usually make people think of stocks not bonds. But the fundamentals of investing and valuation are most clearly seen and best understood with bonds. A mastery of fixed income investment techniques will prepare you for tackling most investment problems.

MGT
499 1371 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

MGT
512 1225 1 4   Corporate Finance
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Tue 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Sync Class meets online (7-9pm) Tues 8/30-12/6, plus in-person (9am-12pm) Sat 9/10, 10/8, 11/5, 12/3. This course explores the fundamental nature of the corporate finance function and the conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of tools for successful financial management. The course is divided into two parts. In Part I, the theory of finance is examined using a conceptual approach that provides the basic tools and concepts necessary for the handling of financial decision-making situations. Topics include capital budgeting, capital markets and securities, risk, return and diversification, valuation, cost of capital, and capital structure. In Part II, an array of cases is used in order to foster students’ ability to apply the tools and analytical skills to real-world situations.

MGT
519 1226 1 2 M1 Drucker Philosophy
TextbookTextbook
Bernard J Jaworski Sat 10:00AM -
5:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Sync Class meets in-person (9am-5pm) on Sat 8/27, and online (7-10pm) on Mon 8/29, 9/12, 9/19, 10/3, 10/10. This course focuses on the life work and key principles of Peter F. Drucker. It is a survey of his work – so, by definition, we will not be able to cover the full spectrum of his thinking. However, you will be exposed to his philosophy – from leading self, organizations and businesses, and to the broader functioning of society itself.

MGT
549 1227 1 2 M1 Designing the Future
TextbookTextbook
Hideki Yamawaki Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous This course is designed for the students enrolling in the Executive Management Program. The focus of this course is on integrating strategy to corporate vision and designing an integrated model to create new business opportunities. For this purpose, this course takes a new approach that combines the management principle suggested by Peter Drucker and the concept of design thinking to create value to potential customers and create the future.

MGT
552 1228 1 2 M2 The Effective Executive
TextbookTextbook
Vijay Sathe Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Sync Class meets online (7-10pm) from Mon 10/31-11/28, and also in-person (1-4pm) on 11/5 & 12/3. The focus of Peter Drucker’s book The Effective Executive is on "managing oneself for effectiveness." As he put it, “Executives who do not manage themselves for effectiveness cannot possibly expect to manage their associates and subordinates... Effectiveness is what executives are paid for, whether they work as managers who are responsible for the performance of others as well as their own, or as individual contributors for their own performance only." (2006, p. ix). This course builds on Drucker’s seminal work by focusing on how you can become more effective in the workplace by understanding and applying the keys that drive job performance, job satisfaction, happiness at work and personal and professional growth.

MUSIC
231 1032 1 2 - 4   Clarinet
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Michael Yoshimi. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student's academic advisor, the student, and the instructor prior to registering for this class.

MUSIC
231 1033 2 2 - 4   Clarinet
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Margaret Thornhill. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student's academic advisor, the student, and the instructor prior to registering for this class.

MUSIC
232 1034 1 2 - 4   Double Bass
TextbookTextbook
Ryan Baird  -
No Room Needed In-Person Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
233 1035 1 2 - 4   Flute
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Keren Schweitzer. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student, and the instructor prior to registering for this class.

MUSIC
236 1036 1 2 - 4   Harpsichord
TextbookTextbook
Robert Zappulla  -
No Room Needed In-Person Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
239 1037 1 2 - 4   Baroque Cello
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructor: Jaap ter Linden. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member Individual instruction in performing the cello in the style of the baroque period.

MUSIC
241 1038 1 2 - 4   Piano
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
No Room Needed In-Person Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
248 1039 1 2 - 4   Violin
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Lindsey Strand-Polyak. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
248 1040 2 2 - 4   Violin
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Lucy Lewis. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
249 1041 1 2 - 4   Violoncello
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Marek Szpakiewicz. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student's academic advisor, the student, and the instructor prior to registering for this class.

MUSIC
250 1042 1 2 - 4   Voice
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Helene Quintana. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
250 1043 2 2 - 4   Voice
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Camelia Voin. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
251 1044 1 2 - 4   Conducting
TextbookTextbook
Staff  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: David Rentz. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
251 1045 2 2 - 4   Conducting
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Miguel Harth-Bedoya. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
259 1046 1 2 - 4   Fortepiano
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
No Room Needed In-Person Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
270 1268 1 1   Performance Forum
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim Thu 10:00AM -
12:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This course is essentially a playing/master class open to all Music students enrolled in performance programs, as well as other Music students by permission of the instructor. Students will perform regularly and be critiqued by the instructor and other course members. A strong emphasis will be placed on historical performance practices as outlined in primary sources, thus periodic reading assignments from performance treatises throughout history will comprise an important part of the course. 4 units of MUS 270 are required of doctoral students enrolled in keyboard performance programs.

MUSIC
275 1047 1 2 - 4   Baroque Violin
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Lindsey Strand-Polyak. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
299RP 1048 1 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
No Room Needed In-Person Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1049 2 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Lindsey Strand-Polyak. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1050 3 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Nadia Shpachenko-Gottesman. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1388 4 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Helene A Quintana. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1403 5 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Instructor: Gayle Blankenburg. Class meetings are arranged by student and faculty member Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
301A 1266 1 4   Music Literature & Historical Styles Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Robert Zappulla Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Designed to provide an overview of music literature from the Middle Ages to the mid-twentieth century with concentrated analysis of representative works, using analytical techniques appropriate for the period under discussion. Although this core sequence concentrates on Western music, comparison, as well as comparative methodologies, with other world music cultures may be introduced.

MUSIC
302 1267 1 4   Music Research Methodology & Bibliography
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Fri 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Mark Howard This course introduces the many types of electronic and print bibliographic tools needed to pursue research in music. The course also covers research methods, citation practices, and ways to evaluate research.

MUSIC
304 1280 1 4   Hist of Performance Practices
TextbookTextbook
Robert Zappulla Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Discussions and presentations concerning performance-practice issues.

MUSIC
335 1270 1 4   American Titans: The Music of Copland & Bernstein
TextbookTextbook
Peter Boyer Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person A study of the compositions and titanic contributions to American music of two of its seminal composers: Aaron Copland (1900-1990) and Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990). Biographical information on these composers will be addressed, as will their other highly significant musical activities as conductors, pianists, authors, teachers, and ambassadors of American musical culture; but the primary focus will be on their compositions. The course will examine their training; the influences of diverse musical styles, historical and cultural events upon their works; the genres to which they contributed; and the evolution of their individual compositional styles and techniques. Of particular interest will be questions regarding the establishment of an "American sound" on the world stage of music composition in the twentieth century, and the key roles played by Copland and Bernstein in this arena.

MUSIC
380 1269 1 4   Composition
TextbookTextbook
Peter Boyer Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Composition Seminar becomes the primary class for composition instruction beginning in the Fall 2021 semester. All composition majors (except those who have completed coursework) are expected to enroll in it. Composition majors will share their original works in progress each week, with opportunities for detailed feedback and guidance from the instructor, as well as feedback from their peers. The majority of class time will be devoted to regular sharing and in-depth discussion of student works. Additionally, the instructor may present relevant contemporary repertoire by established composers for discussion. The instructor may provide one-on-one instruction and guidance in addition to group class time. Non-composition majors may enroll with instructor approval.

MUSIC
400M 1051 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

MUSIC
499 1052 1 0   Doctoral Study (DMA and PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PFF
530 1298 1 0   Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education
TextbookTextbook
Shelby Lamar, Shamini Dias, . Faculty Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructors: TBD & Shelby Lamar & Shamini Dias. Free for current students. To earn the College Teaching Certificate, you also must complete the PFF 531 course, Pedagogy Practicum and Portfolio.  This course invites you on a transformative journey to develop the mindsets to become an ethical, agile leader of learning. We present teaching as a transdisciplinary and inclusive future-focused endeavor for positive learning and development in diverse settings, within and beyond the classroom. In doing so, we engage with the question of how we can effectively and ethically respond to increasingly complex global and institutional contexts in preparing learners holistically for their futures. Working collaboratively in multidisciplinary teams, we will use systems, complexity, and design thinking frameworks to explore student identities and diversity in our classrooms, the changing global paradigms that shift our teaching missions and methods, and what learning sciences and the ethics of education tell us about engagement and motivation. We will also draw from other key frameworks such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL), Active Learning, and Good Work in this exploration. We will work reflexively by integrating a Portfolio-based approach individually and in teams to explore and document our own assumptions, values, and beliefs about education and how these transform in the light of our discoveries about ethical, agile teaching. Our goal will be to co-create pedagogical principles that transcend disciplinary teaching and learning cultures toward agile, ethical leadership of learning in our diverse educational and work contexts. To earn the College Teaching Certificate, you also must complete the PFF 531 course, Pedagogy Practicum and Portfolio.

PFF
530 1411 2 0   Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education
TextbookTextbook
Shelby Lamar Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous This course invites you on a transformative journey to develop the mindsets to become an ethical, agile leader of learning. We present teaching as a transdisciplinary and inclusive future-focused endeavor for positive learning and development in diverse settings, within and beyond the classroom. In doing so, we engage with the question of how we can effectively and ethically respond to increasingly complex global and institutional contexts in preparing learners holistically for their futures. Working collaboratively in multidisciplinary teams, we will use systems, complexity, and design thinking frameworks to explore student identities and diversity in our classrooms, the changing global paradigms that shift our teaching missions and methods, and what learning sciences and the ethics of education tell us about engagement and motivation. We will also draw from other key frameworks such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL), Active Learning, and Good Work in this exploration. We will work reflexively by integrating a Portfolio-based approach individually and in teams to explore and document our own assumptions, values, and beliefs about education and how these transform in the light of our discoveries about ethical, agile teaching. Our goal will be to co-create pedagogical principles that transcend disciplinary teaching and learning cultures toward agile, ethical leadership of learning in our diverse educational and work contexts. To earn the College Teaching Certificate, you also must complete the PFF 531 course, Pedagogy Practicum and Portfolio.

PFF
531 1299 1 0   Teaching Practicum & Portfolio
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Jessica Knippel, Shelby Lamar, Shamini Dias Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Instructors: TBD & Shelby Lamar & Shamini Dias. Free for current students.Time and work for this course are equivalent to a 4-unit course. You must have completed the course, Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education (listed as PFF 530, PFF 520, or TNDY 430), to enroll in this course as it is a prerequisite for PFF 531 Teaching Practicum and Portfolio. This class structures your progress through the teaching practicum and completion of all the teaching portfolio items for the College Teaching Certificate. In this course, you will apply the principles and frameworks from “Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education” into practice. The class is presented through an online, asynchronous format with coaching modules and a structured assignment submission and feedback process. Using the work that you began in “Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education”, you will complete your teaching philosophy statement, diversity statement, and sample course design and syllabus. In addition, you will develop a sample learning management system course and a teacher-scholar website. The course culminates in a final integrated reflection of your entire PFF journey toward becoming an inclusive, future-focused educator.

PHIL
499 1107 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
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. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PP
300 1122 1 4   American Politics & Institutions
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Carlos A. Algara Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. This core course introduces the process and institutions of American governance as understood by contemporary political scientists. The approach is thematic and covers a wide range of topics from conventional political institutions to political economy.

PP
313 1120 1 4   Representation & Elections
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Carlos A. Algara Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. This course is intended to provide an overview of the concept of political representation, with specific emphases on both the institutional arrangements within the society--and how they shape outcomes--as well as the capabilities of individuals to function in a democratic context.

PP
330 1123 1 4   Public Policy Process
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Heather Campbell Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. This core course examines how policy is formed, framed, and filtered in the American Political system. Various theories and models of policy making are examined and compared. Emphasis is placed on the process interactions between decision makers, interest groups, administrative agencies, the courts, the media, and the general citizenry in formulating, adopting, implementing and evaluating policy.

PP
400M 1378 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
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. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

PP
480 1121 1 4   Nature of Inquiry
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Tanu Kumar Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. The main goal of this course is to introduce students to interpreting and collecting data to answer social science questions. With respect to interpretation, students will learn how to define correlations and causal effects. This overview will include an introduction to the idea of regression and the basics of design-based causal inference. With respect to collecting data, students will survey fundamental concepts of measurement, field data collection (including surveys and the role of qualitative data), and content analysis. By the end of the course, students should understand 1) how to find and describe relationships in quantitative data, 2) interpret findings in cutting-edge social science research, and 3) design a data collection plan for their own research ideas. PP 480 is the class equivalent as INST 489.

PP
482 1124 1 4   Advanced Quantitative Research Methods
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Javier Rodriguez Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. Regression analysis is a universal tool in social science research; it appears in every-day TV news, on the radio, in the scientific literature… But, what exactly is a regression? What exactly does it do and how does it do it? What is it good for? This course is an introduction to social science research through the lenses of regression analysis in plain English. One key goal of this course is to equip students with sound statistical understanding—one that will help them identify the uses and abuses of statistical reasoning. It will also cultivate rigorous critical judgment for evaluating quantitative studies of real-world political, economic, and social problems. Interestingly, the course uses a unique statistical visualization format, such that students are able to “see with their own eyes” (above and beyond equations) what’s statistics and regression analysis all about. In summary, this course offers a great opportunity to students to finally nail down a critical set of statistical and analytical skills they will continue to apply for the rest of their academic and professional lives.

PP
484 1119 1 4   Survey Research
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Tyler T. Reny Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Public opinion is central to politics. Understanding how and what mass publics think is critical for assessing the capacity of electorates to participate politically and how well institutions represent the wishes of the people. To understand public opinion we can poll small samples to make inferences about large populations but how we design surveys, construct our samples, and analyze this data can drastically affect our conclusions. This course combines theory with hands-on field research to address these topics and more.

PP
499 1372 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PSYCH
302 1160 1 4   Research Methods
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William D. Crano Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person This course surveys contemporary research methods in psychology. After a brief introduction to the philosophy of science, the major emphasis in the early portion of the course is on research conceptualization, design, and measurement, with a particular focus on the logic of minimizing the number of viable alternative explanations for a set of findings. The second part of the course covers issues of interpretation - from detecting data patterns to inferring whether a set of findings can be generalized to other people, places, and time periods. A number of specialized topics and the ethics of psychological studies are also covered.

PSYCH
302A 1163 1 4   Research Methods
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Jason Siegel Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person This course surveys contemporary research methods in psychology. After a brief introduction to the philosophy of science, the major emphasis in the early portion of the course is on research conceptualization, design, and measurement, with a particular focus on the logic of minimizing the number of viable alternative explanations for a set of findings. The second part of the course covers issues of interpretation – from detecting data patterns to inferring whether a set of findings can be generalized to other people, places, and time periods. A number of specialized topics and the ethics of psychological studies are also covered.

PSYCH
302A 1164 2 4   Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Jason Siegel Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This course surveys contemporary research methods in psychology. After a brief introduction to the philosophy of science, the major emphasis in the early portion of the course is on research conceptualization, design, and measurement, with a particular focus on the logic of minimizing the number of viable alternative explanations for a set of findings. The second part of the course covers issues of interpretation – from detecting data patterns to inferring whether a set of findings can be generalized to other people, places, and time periods. A number of specialized topics and the ethics of psychological studies are also covered.

PSYCH
302AL 1165 1 0   Research Methods Lab (MA students only)
TextbookTextbook
Jason Siegel Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This is the research lab component of Psych 302A which has to be taken concurrently (MA students only)

PSYCH
302L 1161 1 0   Research Methods Lab (PhD students only)
TextbookTextbook
William D. Crano Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This is the research lab component of Psych 302 which has to be taken concurrently

PSYCH
306B 1152 1 2   Directed Research: Social Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Michael Hogg Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Class meets Tues 8/30, 9/13, 9/27, 10/18, 11/1, 11/15, 11/29. All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
306C 1157 1 2   Directed Research: Cognitive
TextbookTextbook
Kathy Pezdek Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Class meets 9/2, 9/16, 9/30, 10/14, 10/28, 11/11, 12/2 All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
306E 1175 1 2   Directed Research: Evaluation & Applied Research Methods and Positive Developmental
TextbookTextbook
Wanda D. Casillas Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous The purpose of this course is to provide a broad background in conducting research on evaluation and to help students successfully complete the first year of the Ph.D. program. Guided by the instructor, students will articulate research interests, build writing skills, explore career goals, and discuss professional development issues in the field of evaluation. This course is also designed to help students navigate CGU, available resources, and program requirements. The goals of the fall semester are to identify and work for a research advisor, formulate a testable research idea, and gain mastery of the literature in that topic area. By the end of the spring semester, students are expected to turn in the full thesis proposal that has been signed off by two faculty members. This proposal is intended to serve as the basis for the first-year project/master’s thesis.

PSYCH
306F 1150 1 2   Directed Research: Organizational Behavior
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Rebecca Reichard Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Class meets Wed 8/31, 9/14, 9/28, 10/12, 10/26, 11/9, 12/7. All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
308A 1168 1 2 M1 Intermediate Statistics
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Jessica Diaz. Class meets Tues & Thurs. Topics include descriptive techniques, probability theory, basic statistical distributions (binomial, t, z, X2, F), measures of central tendency and variability, sampling distributions, selected nonparametric methods, and hypothesis testing.

PSYCH
308B 1169 1 2 M2 ANOVA
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Jessica Diaz. Class meets Tues & Thurs. Topics include basic analysis of variance (ANOVA) designs, nonparametric analysis, log-linear models and corresponding computer programs.

PSYCH
315EE 1173 1 4   Evaluation Procedures
TextbookTextbook
Tiffany Berry Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Evaluation practice comprises the integration of three facets: (1) program context (e.g., stakeholders, politics, maturity of the program, complexity of the program, etc.); (2) evaluators (e.g., level of expertise, theoretical perspectives, competency, etc.); and (3) evaluation methods (e.g., type of design, interviews, surveys, case studies, RCTs, etc.). These facets are interrelated and constantly evolving, yet need to be in balance for effective evaluation practice to emerge. Thus, this class is designed to cover these three facets as well as the stages of and methods for conducting program evaluations that are theoretically grounded, practical, and useful.

PSYCH
315EE 1174 2 4   Evaluation Procedures
TextbookTextbook
Wanda D. Casillas Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Evaluation practice comprises the integration of three facets: (1) program context (e.g., stakeholders, politics, maturity of the program, complexity of the program, etc.); (2) evaluators (e.g., level of expertise, theoretical perspectives, competency, etc.); and (3) evaluation methods (e.g., type of design, interviews, surveys, case studies, RCTs, etc.). These facets are interrelated and constantly evolving, yet need to be in balance for effective evaluation practice to emerge. Thus, this class is designed to cover these three facets as well as the stages of and methods for conducting program evaluations that are theoretically grounded, practical, and useful.

PSYCH
315I 1176 1 4   Longitudinal Methods
TextbookTextbook
Saeideh Heshmati Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. This course is focused on key methodological issues associated with the analysis of longitudinal data in the social sciences. General areas to be covered include the manipulation/organization/description of the types of empirical data obtained in developmental research, and the application/implementation of multivariate analysis techniques to those data. The purpose is to assist graduate students in the acquisition of skills in the formulation of research questions, design of studies, measurement devices, and methods of analysis.

PSYCH
315J 1167 1 4   Survey Research Methods
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Jason Siegel Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This is a practically oriented course on methods of survey research that covers the planning and administration of survey questionnaires, sampling, the construction of questionnaires and interviews, principles of field work and coding, and the analysis of questionnaire data. During the module, class members will carry out a joint survey research project, making use of their learning about all phases of survey research.

PSYCH
315Q 1172 1 4   Qualitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Kendall Bronk Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person This course is designed to introduce you to different types of qualitative research methods, with a particular emphasis on how they can be utilized in the study of organizations. Although you will be introduced to many of the theoretical paradigms that underlie the specific methods that we will cover, the primary emphasis in the course will be on how you can utilize different methods in applied research settings. We will explore the appropriate application of various techniques and review the strengths and limitations associated with each. In addition, you will be given the opportunity to gain experience in the use of several different methods, including participant observation, interviews, focus groups, and document analysis.

PSYCH
318 1181 1 4   Overview of Social Psychology
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. Faculty Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Heidi Riggio In this course, I will provide a broad introduction to many of the major themes that characterize today's social psychology. Of course, it will be impossible to touch upon all of the phenomena of interest to social psychologists, but I hope to provide a reasonable sampling of the field. Reading assignments from the text should be considered starting points. They are not comprehensive. They should be used as helpful introductions to a vibrant, active, and well-researched field.

PSYCH
319 1149 1 4   Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Reichard Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person This course is a detailed survey of core areas of organizational behavior. The course will cover theory, research, and selected applications on topics such as organizational structure, roles, technology, communication, effectiveness, job design and motivation, leadership, group dynamics, change and development.

PSYCH
320 1162 1 4   Attitudes & Social Influence
TextbookTextbook
William D. Crano Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This course is designed to provide a broad introduction to the theories, and the experimental, correlational, and quasi-experimental research that constitutes the literature of social influence. The scientific literature of the field is extensive, so it is difficult to consider more than a small fraction of that which has been done, but we will make a valiant attempt at both broad and deep coverage. Topics will include the measurement of attitudes, attitude formation (origins of attitudes), minority influence (how minorities prevail), compliance, conformity, and obedience, principles of communication and persuasion, attitude strength and vested interest, attitude-behavior consistency, and models of attitude-behavior relations. In the final section of the course, the class will focus on applications of the research introduced of the initial sections of the course.

PSYCH
321 1180 1 4   Organizational Theory
TextbookTextbook
Maria Gloria Gonzalez Morales Thu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined Concurrent Sync Students will read and discuss weekly perspectives represented in classic works on organizations from a variety of fields. The aim is both to gain an appreciation of the eclecticism and continuing concerns in the field of organizational theory and to aid students in applying theoretical orientations to practical events. Organizations are complex phenomena that can be analyzed on the individual, group, interorganizational, and societal levels. Approaches from engineering, psychology, sociology, political science, anthropology, economics, and business administration will be included to aid our understanding of the dynamics of organizational behavior on these different levels. Topics covered in this course will include theories of organizational structure, organizations as systems and cultures, decision making, intergroup conflict and negotiation, and impacts of information technology on modern organizations.

PSYCH
321B 1151 1 2   Doctoral Seminar in Leadership
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Reichard Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Class meets Wed 9/7, 9/21, 10/5, 10/19, 11/2, 11/16, 11/30. This course is designed to enhance your knowledge and skills of applied research in the field of leadership and leader development. The objective of this course is to give graduate students experience in conducting research. In addition to reading about what organizational researchers and practitioners do, students will be doing applied research. The course will afford students an insider's view of the joys and pains of applied research, either by building on previous empirical work or beginning a new research program. Each student will work under the guidance and supervision of the professor on an applied research project with the goal of publication.

PSYCH
322A 1159 1 4   Applying Principles of Group Influence
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Eusebio Alvaro MonWed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Class meets on specific Mon & Wed: 8/29 & 8/31; 9/12 & 9/14; 9/26 & 9/28; 10/10 & 10/12; 10/24 & 10/26; 11/7 & 11/9; 11/28 & 11/30. This course will review social psychology theory and research in intra- and intergroup processes with the goal of improving health and other socially important outcomes. Students will learn how group behavior – both within and between groups – can impinge upon common outcomes and, more centrally, how such behavior may be harnessed to improve these outcomes. Moreover, students will learn how to apply this content to actual health and socially relevant contexts. Throughout the course, examples of group and interpersonal influences will be drawn from past and ongoing real-world health and social change interventions.

PSYCH
326 1305 1 2   Foundations of Evaluation
TextbookTextbook
Wanda D. Casillas Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Class meets 9/1, 9/15, 9/29, 10/13, 10/27, 11/10, 12/1 Every time we try something new, we often ask ourselves "is it better than similar items? What makes it good? What is its value?" This process of valuing may be applied to anything from purchasing a computer, to judging the quality of a school curriculum, or an organization’s training program. The art and science of valuing is called Evaluation. All human beings evaluate, albeit informally, but the ability to evaluate systematically is important to our society and has the power to help improve individual lives and society as a whole. This course aims to introduce you to some of the prevalent ideas that underpin the evaluation field and its practice.

PSYCH
329 1177 1 4   Foundations of Positive Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Jeanne Nakamura Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person A general introduction to the history and intellectual sources of this new field. It will acquaint students with the main topics of research and application. These will include the phenomenology of positive experience, virtues and strengths, and institutional supports for positive development through the life course – e.g., families, schools, work environments, community involvement.

PSYCH
330A 1166 1 4   Child Development
TextbookTextbook
Kendall Bronk Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person This course surveys the theoretical and empirical literature on social and cognitive development in the first decade of life. This seminar-style course is primarily based on discussions of seminal research and theory focused on infancy through childhood. Both classic and positive developmental perspectives will be considered. Students will gain competencies in synthesizing research, critically appraising prior work, and generating new ideas for research in child development.

PSYCH
336A 1178 1 4   Emotions
TextbookTextbook
Saeideh Heshmati Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. This course will introduce students to a diverse array of theoretical and empirical issues related to the study of human emotion. We will explore theoretical perspectives and research on what emotions are, what functions they serve, and what roles emotions and emotion regulation play in many parts of our lives such as mental health, social relationships, and decision making. Some questions the course will address include: What are our emotions? What purpose do they serve? How do emotions relate to our thoughts, memories, and behaviors towards others? What happens when our emotional responses go awry? The readings will incorporate a wide array of tools that scientists have adopted to understand emotions at different levels of analysis, such as the use of physiological measures (including brain activity), behavioral measures, self-reports of experience, and data acquired through social media. We will consider how these methods can be applied to studying mental illness in both children and adults. We conclude by studying the pursuit of happiness and well-being, trying to understand what makes us happy through the lens of emotions.

PSYCH
350D 1156 1 4   Law & Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Kathy Pezdek Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. In this seminar we will explore the scientific knowledge that psychologists bring to the courtroom when they testify about topics relevant to clinical, social, cognitive and developmental psychology. The legal standards that govern the admissibility of psychology expert testimony and define the adjudication of these issues will also be critically examined. Additionally, the policy implications of modifying the governing legal standards and the scope of psychological research will be discussed. Student research projects will be a central component of the course.

PSYCH
350UT 1158 1 4   Interaction Design and Usability Testing
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Danielle Green Understand and apply interaction design theory and techniques to conceive, design and test responsive websites that run on the web and mobile devices.

PSYCH
350W 1170 1 2 M1 Flow-the Positive Psychological Experience
TextbookTextbook
Jeanne Nakamura Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This is a seminar-style graduate course dependent on critical reading of the texts, in-class discussion, and thoughtful analytic writing.

PSYCH
350Y 1171 1 2 M2 Good Work
TextbookTextbook
Jeanne Nakamura Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person This is a 2-unit elective seminar in positive psychology that will provide an opportunity to examine what is distinctive about work in the professions (e.g., medicine, teaching, nursing) and then explore theory and research concerning three forms of “the good” that are relevant to all workers but arguably hold particular relevance for professional work because of its traditional emphasis on serving others. These aspects are (1) ethics and social/moral responsibility; (2) engagement, calling, flow, and passion; and (3) excellence, expertise, and craft. We will examine contributors to good work, with special attention to developmental antecedents, as well as potential dark sides of good work (e.g., burnout). PSYCH 329 (Foundations of Positive Psychology) is helpful background but not required.

PSYCH
352NN 1179 1 4   The Psychology of Bias: Stereotyping, Prejudice and Discrimination
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Anna Woodcock The objective of this course is to understand the causes and consequences of judging people based on their social group membership. This course critically reviews seminal and contemporary theoretical and empirical writings in social psychology about stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. We will examine bias from the perspectives of perceivers and targets and examine strategies for identifying and reducing our own biases and confronting the biases of others. Topics include: social categorization; control and automaticity, stereotype activation and application; stereotype threat; social identity; “old-fashioned” and contemporary forms of prejudice, implicit and subtle biases, interpersonal and institutional discrimination; intergroup contact, stigma and stigma by association; privilege; recognizing and reducing prejudice and discrimination.

PSYCH
352T 1154 1 4   Extremism
TextbookTextbook
Michael Hogg Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person The course explores the dark side of the human experience. It takes the perspective of different approaches and theories; largely drawing on social psychology but also very much on the behavioral and social sciences more broadly. It covers a diverse range of phenomena: Populism, conspiracy theories, and narratives of victimhood; Deindividuation and the violent crowd; Hierarchy and dominance; Dehumanization and genocide; Fascism, right wing authoritarianism and the authoritarian personality; Frustration, relative deprivation and social protest; Radicalization and violent extremism; Xenophobia and Immigration; Gangs, cartels and organized crime; Identity echo chambers and alternative realities; Autocrats, despots and "Dark Triad" leaders; Zealotry and group centrism; Social disintegration, polarization and schism. The course will be student-presentation and class-discussion based, and involve collaborative breakout groups tasked with designing research and/or exploring intervention and policy implications. There will be some presentations by external topic-area experts.

PSYCH
400M 1182 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

PSYCH
413 1155 1 2   Social Identity: Theory and Research Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Michael Hogg Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Class meets 9/9, 9/23, 10/7, 10/21, 10/28, 11/11, 12/9. This social psychology course focuses on social identity theory, broadly defined. It examines its cognitive, motivational and social interactive dimensions, and studies a wide array of social identity and social identity-related processes and phenomena within and between small groups and large social categories. Students will engage with conceptual issues to advance theory, and will be involved in designing, operationalizing and conducting empirical research, and writing-up research for publication and conference presentation. The course is intended for social PhDs but also open to social MA and other psychology PhDs. Students wishing to enroll should obtain permission from Professor Hogg.

PSYCH
499 1183 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

RELIGION
354 1108 1 4   What Is Scripture?
TextbookTextbook
Tammi Schneider Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
IAC Library In-Person This course will examine the category of "scripture." It will unpack such questions as: authority, community, role of scripture, material. There will also be an applied component as students will be responsible for choosing a "scripture" to unpack and present it through all the critical modes examined in the first part of the class.

RELIGION
367 1148 1 4   Evil
TextbookTextbook
Kevin Wolfe Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
IAC Library In-Person Evil, suffering, and, especially, unjust, or meaningless, suffering: these concerns have vexed thinkers from the ancient world to the present. While the advent of Christianity added different layers to some of these reflections, it isn’t until the 18th century that we get some of the formulations we associate with the “problem of evil.” After an earthquake devastated Lisbon in 1755, scholars and theologians debated whether it was a message from an angry God or the impartial work of nature. Today, the modern science that explains the seismic event still leaves philosophical questions unresolved: Does suffering come from a supernatural force intervening in our lives, from human imperfection, or from something else altogether? Does it even make sense to think of natural phenomena as evil? Or is evil solely about human behavior? Is evil a real force, or is it a category we use to explain our history and experience? How could a just God allow unjust suffering—from slavery and the Holocaust to the more ordinary evils that we all encounter? If there is no God, can evil be overcome? In this Seminar, we reflect on evil as problematic, with close analysis of influential texts, like the Book of Job, to thinkers such as Josiah Royce, William James, and Friedrich Nietzsche. We will also use some of these philosophical reflections to help us analyze films that include Carl Theodor Dreyer’s Ordet and Lars von Trier’s Breaking the Waves. We will use the last few weeks to explore students’ work as they present on their research projects.

RELIGION
400M 1113 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

RELIGION
401 1109 1 4   Classical Theories and History of Religious Studies
TextbookTextbook
Tammi Schneider Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
IAC Library In-Person This course will train students in key themes, figures, and theories in the field of religious studies.

RELIGION
416 1110 1 4   Religion in America-1865 to Today
TextbookTextbook
Daniel Ramirez Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Blaisdell 7 In-Person In spite of secularization theories, religion refuses to recede, or so it would seem from our current political and social landscape/soundscape. This course will introduce students to some of the most important and innovative recent scholarly work examining the significance and shape of religion in the modern United States. One of the hallmarks of American religion has been its sheer variety; it is a process intensified by immigration, schism, and racial and ethnic diversity and struggle. Accordingly, course readings seek to capture something of the impressive pluralism characteristic of American spirituality in the past century and a half. We will consider American religious history within its broader cultural, political, and intellectual context. Accordingly, we will first assay an initial surveying expedition that reflects state-of-the-question research across many areas, followed by a comparative mapping of current (undergraduate) textbooks and syllabi, in order to examine the guild’s production of knowledge through its framing practices. Finally, a study of several monographs will allow us to excavate deeply into selected topics and weigh scholars’ findings in terms of evidence, method and theory, and to zero in on the contested intersections of race, ethnicity, class, gender/sexuality, and nationalism.

RELIGION
432IS 1323 1 4   Islam in America
TextbookTextbook
Ruqayya Khan Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
IAC Library In-Person An introduction to Islam within the context of North America through an inter-disciplinary lens. Among the issues that will inform this course are: How can assessing Islam in America help us to address the frequent problem of ‘essentialized’ Islam? In other words, how do we do justice to understanding the complexities of American Islam as one among many “islams” in our world today? Our aim also will be to creatively address and critically think stereotypes of Islam as an alien, violent, sexist, racialized (read "Black" and/or "Arab") religion. What constitutes an American-Muslim or Muslim-American identity? While keeping the North American context at hand, we take up questions such as: How have debates regarding immigration, Afghanistan, ISIS, jihad, terrorism and sufis/Sufism unfolded within the American milieu? Why did 9/11 occur and what kind of shadow cast on contemporary polemics regarding Islam in America? Why do some Muslim women veil in North America and what issues, dilemmas, liberties have they confronted or embraced in this context? How do the contemporary waves of feminism work through the complexities of stocktaking veiling in North America? This course will also examine the intersecting topics of Black Islam in America and Islam in Black America, in other words, the interconnections between immigrant/first generation Muslims and Black Muslims as well as those between the Black Church and Black Islam in America. There will be course segments on slavery and Islam in America; Nation of Islam, including the legacies of Warith Deen Muhammad; Malcolm X and impact of his biography and contributions; the Ahmadiyya Movement and its role in historically bringing Islam to Black America.

RELIGION
463 1112 1 4   Gender and Gnosticism
TextbookTextbook
Nicola Denzey Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous The umbrella term "Gnosticism" describes a religious movement of the second century in the Roman Empire that espoused a set of ideas (and sometimes praxis) strikingly different from what came to be "orthodox" Christianity. At the same time, "Gnosticism" as a movement has been subject to a great deal of conceptual revision in the past twenty-five years, and rightly so. In this course, we’ll consider the range of beliefs and practices among groups identified as "Gnostic," and the ways in which gender was differently inflected within those groups. We will pay particular attention to conceptualizations of the divine Feminine, texts featuring divine sexual violence against women, and in terms of praxis, women’s authority, heteronormativity in sexual rituals, and the queering of gender terms.

RELIGION
499 1114 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

SP&E
313 1139 1 4   Microeconomics & Public Policy
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Nancy Neiman. Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. This course is an introduction to microeconomic theory and its application to public policy analysis. You will learn basic, yet powerful analytical tools to understand and evaluate public policy problems. Topics covered include demand and supply analysis, consumer choice theory, the theory of the firm, input market analysis and the analysis of market structure.

SP&E
316 1140 1 4   Computational & Agent-Based Modeling
TextbookTextbook
Mark Abdollahian Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Sync Whether the recent COVID pandemic, resulting economic shocks, increasing social inequality or the changing geo-technology landscapes of the 21st century, complex behavior surrounds us. Data, evidence and theory informed scientific understanding and decision-making offers promise for some tractable solutions to such challenges. However, complex human, social, cultural and behavioral phenomena test researchers and practitioners alike to solve ‘wicked problems’ we face. This begs the question: how can we operationalize decades of hard won, parsimonious social science theory and evidence building for actionable insights into the messy, dynamic real world of deep policy contexts given high dimensional uncertainty often at the limits of predictability and our understanding? Computational social science is one such new frontier for addressing such human, social, cultural and behavioral challenges. Instead of limiting our inquires by our theories and traditional techniques, computational social science explicitly embraces the increasing complexity, interconnectivity and uncertainty in the anthropocene era to search for new answers and possible solutions. Traditional stochastic or econometric models of human behavioral phenomena are being supplanted by dynamic simulation methods drawn from multidisciplinary perspectives including politics, economics, sociology, business as well as the physical sciences. For researchers and practitioners alike, no longer is it sufficient to rely on one particular methodology or discipline. Moreover, the proliferation of computing power has made computational approaches widely available making modeling and simulation a third approach in the scientific enterprise, complimenting traditional theory building, experiments and empirical evidence. Today, teams of scientists are banding together to produce new computational models of ‘wicked problems’ and complex phenomena. This course is the foundational introduction to computational social science, complex adaptive systems and agent based modeling that attempts to address some of society’s latest challenges. Agent based models offer a new methodological bridge across various theoretical disciplines to extending Noble laureate Thomas Schelling’s notions of the micro motivations for macro behavior. Understanding how micro-individuals act, react and interact in meso social contexts lead to the macro political, economic and social structures we live in that feedback to constrain or incentivize individual actions. More importantly, they allow us to model, simulate and text complex phenomena for policymakers, researchers and practitioners alike where many equation based modeling approaches have difficulty. Agent based models allow for various transdisciplinary theories and cross scale, micro-meso-macro human activity approaches to be tested in a mutually inclusive environment, focusing on understanding real world behavior through connectivity, interdependence, emergence, dynamics, self-organization and co-evolution among many other complexity phenomena. The goals of this course are to survey computational social science fundamentals, complex adaptive systems and agent based modeling’s methodological foundations applied across several social science disciplines so students can build their own computational and ABMs. We first introduce the core concepts and methods of computational, complexity science and agent based modeling, then begin our journey through basic to advanced modeling and simulation best practices using NetLogo, supported by applied articles across political, economic and social behavioral domains.

SP&E
318 1138 1 4   Cost Benefit Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Robert Klitgaard Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. Cost-benefit analysis is a core skill in business, government, education, public health, and nonprofit organizations. And yet its theoretical foundations and practical applications are controversial. What should count as "benefits" and "costs" (and for whom)? What discount rate should be used? How should nature be valued? What about saving human lives and preventing disabilities? This graduate seminar examines these issues using examples such as preschool, minimum wages, disaster risk reduction, the social costs of carbon, protecting endangered species, Universal Basic Income, COVID-19, and more.

SP&E
350 1135 1 4   Theories and Issues in Comparative Politics
TextbookTextbook
Melissa Rogers Thu 2:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. This course introduces major topics in comparative politics and provides basic training for comparative politics graduate students. The main purpose of this course is to introduce key questions as well as classic and modern approaches in comparative politics. The course focuses not on facts but on the task of causal (positive) explanation. It explores the major theoretical and conceptual building blocks in the sub-fields: theory, method, development, violence, culture, institutions, parties, regimes, governance, etc. Each week we discuss a subset of the pertinent scholarly literature, mainly focusing on a major theoretical controversy. We compare and contrast answers to important questions and ask what makes an explanation “good.” We discuss when a theory is most useful and if a complementary theory could be posited that would subsume previously conflicting or incompletely successful theories. Upon completion of this course, students should have an understanding of the intellectual trends in the study of comparative politics, knowledge of key concepts and spheres of debate, and an ability to articulate the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches and issues in comparative politics.

SP&E
352 1136 1 4   Comparative Political Economy
TextbookTextbook
Melissa Rogers Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined Hybrid Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. Unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor, students should be present for in-person class sessions. This course examines the interaction between capitalism and democracy. This class studies how the economy affects politics and how politics—in particular, political institutions—shapes economic policies and outcomes. It explores the impact of global markets on national politics and the impact of politics on economic development in both developed and developing countries. We will also examine how various domestic political conditions (e.g. regime type, partisan politics, and constitutional features) affect economic policies (e.g. tax and welfare, growth, inequality, and poverty). This class has two major goals. First, I want students to be able to understand and critically evaluate the major topics of political economy. Second, students will develop a research paper which can be published and/or presented at a major conference. I know that most graduate students do not have a publishable research paper before they finish their dissertations. However, it is important for students to practice writing their own research papers. We will not only study the major debates in the field, but also write a paper which criticizes the existing literature and suggests proposals for improving it. The paper is a great opportunity for you to develop your dissertation proposal.

SP&E
438 1078 1 4   Dynamic Modeling
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Sync Instructor: Kyungkook Kang System dynamics is a computer-aided approach to policy analysis, design and scientific research. This course is designed to introduce system dynamics concepts, methods, modeling and applications to political, economic, social, managerial or ecological challenges of the 21st century - focusing on phenomena as systems in toto, characterized by interdependence, mutual interaction, information feedback and causality. The approach begins with defining problems dynamically, proceeds through mapping and modeling stages, for building confidence in the model, inferences and policy implications. Conceptually, the feedback concept is at the heart of the system dynamics approach, as well as structure, loop dominance and endogenous change to help explain system behavior. Mathematically, their basic structures are usually captured with coupled differential equations. Simulation of such systems is easily accomplished with readily available computer software that does not require programming. As a capstone, students will work together in teams to design a dynamic model applied to a political, economic or social challenge of their choosing.

SP&E
489 1137 1 4   Computational Tools for Social Science
TextbookTextbook
Tyler T. Reny Wed 2:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. This course is designed to give students a flexible and broad toolkit for conducting quantitative social science research. It will cover the skills needed to collect, clean, aggregate, explore, visualize, and analyze data using the R statistical language. It will cover everything from general programming and workflow to web scraping and mapping. No prior programming experience is required. This course can be taken as a substitute for Econ 328.

TNDY
402X 1192 1 4   Persuasive Technologies
TextbookTextbook
Samir Chatterjee Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Sync CISAT students: please contact the Transdisciplinary Studies Office to obtain a permission code to register for the course. Class meets in-person on 9/7, 9/21, 10/12, 10/26, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16, other weeks online. Can computers change what you think and do? Can they motivate you to stop smoking, persuade you to buy insurance, or convince you to conserve water when you shower? The answer is a resounding "yes". Until recently, most software applications and technologies were developed without much thought to how they influenced their users. This perspective is changing. Today, industry experts and academics are embracing a purposeful approach to persuasive design. In an industry context, designing for persuasion is becoming essential for success. In academic settings, the study of persuasive technology illuminates the principles that influence and motivate people in different aspects of their lives. This course will bring together the latest research happening in three distinct disciplines: information and communication technology, psychology and health sciences. Persuasive technology may be defined as any interactive computing system designed to change people’s attitudes or behaviors without coercion or deception. The emergence of the Internet has led to a proliferation of web sites designed to persuade or motivate people to change their attitudes and behavior. The auction site eBay has developed an online exchange system with enough credibility that users are persuaded to make financial transactions and to divulge personal information. Within the domain of e-health, systems such as mobile applications for managing obesity and digital interventions to overcome addictive behaviors have demonstrated the huge potential of persuasive technologies for behavioral changes. Through presentations, discussions, and case study analyses students will explore this fascinating new field. In addition, the course will host several expert guest speakers (practitioners, researchers, etc.) from SBOS, SCGH and other institutions who will share their latest findings.

TNDY
407V 1184 1 4   Urban Studies
TextbookTextbook
Heather Campbell Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Cities represent about 2% of the world’s area, 50% of the world’s population, 75% of the world’s energy consumption, 80% of the worlds carbon emissions. This class will first ground us in an understanding of, the development of cities, basic understanding of the urban system, how cities are believed to grow (or not), and how we might measure the complex known as “cities.” Once we have those foundations, we will turn to a variety of topical urban policy issues, including environmental justice, public safety, public health, housing, etc., and how recent research addresses such urban policy issues. Studying cities is inherently transdisciplinary since the city is a complex system of systems—the economic system, the governmental system, the transportation system, the environmental system, the social system, the public health system.

TNDY
408O 1185 1 4   Critical Evaluation of the American Criminal Justice System
TextbookTextbook
Gregory J. Deangelo Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous The American criminal justice system has faced unprecedented pressure over the past few years. There have been repeated calls for reform in the criminal justice system from numerous political angles. Such calls have ranged from decriminalizing specific behavior to altogether disbanding and de-funding law enforcement agencies. All the while, community safety remains a clear goal to ensure the well-being of communities. A complicated tension between ensuring community safety and ensuring equal treatment by the criminal justice system exists, requiring careful consideration and nuanced thought. This course will dive deep into these issues with the aim of understanding critical issues presented by as many sides of these arguments as possible.

TNDY
408P 1186 1 4   What is Time?
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Monica Capra Seoane Wed 7:00PM -
8:50PM
To Be Determined Concurrent Blended Class includes an hour of weekly online asynchronous instructional activity. The objective of this course is to learn about how different disciplines understand, measure, and relate to time. The readings, lectures, and discussions are designed to awaken our curiosity about time and broaden our understanding of how our concept of time and the way we measure it has shaped our beliefs, plans, and actions. Topics span from physics to art. We will read about space-time, biological time, time in language, across epochs, across cultures, and in music.

TNDY
408Q 1187 1 2   Grant Writing Across the Disciplines
TextbookTextbook
Marcus S Weakley Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Class meets 8/31, 9/14, 9/28, 10/12, 10/26, 11/09, 11/30. This course is a writing workshop, designed to utilize peer feedback and iterative drafts to assist students in completing a grant application. Students are expected to come with a grant that they will complete the application for by the end of the semester. The course will also cover some key elements of most grant applications and have faculty guests from across the university visit to discuss grant writing in their fields.

TNDY
408R 1188 1 4   Religion and the Post-Colonial Imagination
TextbookTextbook
Kevin Wolfe Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person What is religion? And, what does the "post-colonial" signify? These questions will guide our engagement of the literary and theoretical production of a variety of formerly colonized peoples as seeking if there is something we can identify as the post-colonial imagination. We will use our guiding questions as a way of exploring various problems both raised by and manifested in these works, such as: the nature of identity; the question of nationalism; the writing of history; and questions of class, gender, and race. For our purposes, the emphasis will be on close readings of these works which emerge from the crucible of the "Third World's" "encounter" with European and American colonialism, reflecting on our own methodological formations as we bring those methods to bear on the issues/texts/concerns we encounter.

TNDY
408S 1189 1 4   Angels and Demons
TextbookTextbook
Nicola Denzey Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous Why have these celestial beings held imaginations in thrall – not just in the West, but globally? In this TNDY course, we’ll consider various perspectives and iterations of angels and demons – from ancient medicine to contemporary movies. Our purview is broad and transcultural, covering Akkadian, Jewish, Christian, Islamic, Buddhist, and neo-pagan texts, and phenomena such as angelic visions and demonic exorcisms.

TNDY
430 1190 1 4   Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education
TextbookTextbook
Shamini Dias, Shelby Lamar Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Web-Online Synchronous This course invites you on a transformative journey to develop the mindsets to become an ethical, agile leader of learning. We present teaching as a transdisciplinary and inclusive future-focused endeavor for positive learning and development in diverse settings, within and beyond the classroom. In doing so, we engage with the question of how we can effectively and ethically respond to increasingly complex global and institutional contexts in preparing learners holistically for their futures. Working collaboratively in multidisciplinary teams, we will use systems, complexity, and design thinking frameworks to explore student identities and diversity in our classrooms, the changing global paradigms that shift our teaching missions and methods, and what learning sciences and the ethics of education tell us about engagement and motivation. We will also draw from other key frameworks such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL), Active Learning, and Good Work in this exploration. We will work reflexively by integrating a Portfolio-based approach individually and in teams to explore and document our own assumptions, values, and beliefs about education and how these transform in the light of our discoveries about ethical, agile teaching. Our goal will be to co-create pedagogical principles that transcend disciplinary teaching and learning cultures toward agile, ethical leadership of learning in our diverse educational and work contexts. To earn the College Teaching Certificate, you also must complete the PFF 531 course, Pedagogy Practicum and Portfolio.

TNDY
488 1191 1 4   Transdisciplinary Public Policy Capstone
TextbookTextbook
Robert Klitgaard Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person There are many exciting projects in applied policy research that cross disciplinary boundaries, where research teams include policy analysts, evaluators, psychologists, economists, technologists and others. This course will serve as both a capstone project course for MPP students as well as a chance for non-policy students to work in transdisciplinary teams and collaborate around real-world problem-solving through applied research. Guided projects will work across the different stages of problem-based research, policy implementation and project evaluation. Pre-requisite: students must be in their final semester of coursework.

WGS
302 1271 1 4   The Economics of Women and the Family
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Eleanor Brown Why do heterosexual married men make more money than single men with similar characteristics such as age, race, and education? Economists were quick to hypothesize (e.g. Korenman and Neumark 1991) that it was due to specialization and comparative advantage: wives would take over the work at home so that husbands could focus their energies on their jobs. But then another pair of economists (Cornwell and Rupert 1997) noticed something interesting: the men who were going to end up being the well-paid married guys actually started making more money before they got married. Perhaps women had a good eye for a good earner and were marrying the men who were going to earn a lot. Or maybe the men who have the noncognitive skills to thrive in the workplace also have the skills to sustain a marriage. Or perhaps it has nothing to do with productivity and everything to do with social norms that figured that a cisgender family man was the sort of worker you would want to promote. This course invites you to engage with an interesting body of economic research with an eye to understanding both the power of formal modeling and the limits of any one model in capturing all essential features of complex economic and social phenomena. Our course provides an opportunity to develop deeper appreciations of the implicit assumptions we harbor in our thinking about the economics of gender and family. Once aware, we can sharpen our ability to think analytically in order to frame our preferred hypotheses, and let the pursuit of knowledge bring pleasure to the act of confronting our hunches with data, even when the data suggest that we might have to revise our hunches.

WGS
304 1115 1 4   Feminist Research Methods and Inquiry
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Dionne Bensonsmith An examination feminist methods and theoretical approaches to research and analysis.? Participants will focus on debates within and about feminist methodology, for example, feminist theorizing of experience, feminist and women of color epistemologies, and situated knowledge.? Participants will explore theorizing across disciplines and cultural contexts, focusing on both methodology (theories of the research process) and epistemology (theories of knowledge).? We will survey a range of feminist research methods and their applications across disciplines and areas, and address contemporary methodologies employed by scholars doing research in?and?with communities of color and/or marginalized communities. Topics may include trauma-informed research methods, storywork and narrative methods, decolonial, intersectional, queer, and critical race methodologies.

WGS
309 1116 1 4   Composing Black Masculinity: African American Authors Re-Writing the 20th Century
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Lawrence Davis At the turn of the twentieth century, African American novelists imagined Black masculinities as sites to explore citizenship. However, their novels explore subjectivities that thwart reader expectations. Migration and urbanization provided new ways to articulate the dynamics of race, gender, and sexuality. Throughout the term we will study works that ponder, challenge, and satirize the range of narrative Black masculinities. Our theoretical lens will focus on a range of intellectuals, including James Baldwin, Charles Chestnutt, Chester Himes, and Wallace Thurman.

WRITING
350 1301 1 0   Dissertation and Thesis Writing
TextbookTextbook
Marcus S Weakley Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined Concurrent Sync This course is designed for students at the writing stage of a thesis, dissertation proposal, or dissertation. This course is designed with a two-fold purpose: to cover major topics on the writing process and structures related to theses and dissertations, and to provide structured writing time, accountability, and feedback. Adapting the format of the Center for Writing & Rhetoric's dissertation boot camps into a course, each week will include an examination of a relevant writing topic as well as dedicated writing time. The course aims to increase writer productivity by developing individualized writing plans and habits in conjunction with community-based, structured writing time and instruction on applicable writing topics. Students must be in the writing phase for a thesis, dissertation proposal, or dissertation to take the course. Please contact the instructor with any questions.