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2023 Spring - *ALL
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Subj
Cat# Class# Sect Units Mod Course
Faculty Day
Time
Location Instruction Mode Note
Description

AFR
338 3237 1 4   Concepts & Methods of Africana Studies
TextbookTextbook
Darrell Moore Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 35 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. In Concepts & Methods in Africana Studies we will read and discuss the contributions of five contemporary thinkers in the field: Édouard Glissant, Saidiya Hartman, Achille Mbembe, Fred Moten, and Hortense Spillers. Our discussions will be attentive to the following question: how does each thinker conceptualize her/his object of analysis? This question contains two concerns: how and what? The question how Africana thinkers do what they do is a concern of method. How does the field of Africana Studies (and Africana intellectual practices generally) bring its objects of study into being? How does any singular object of study (e.g., freedom or desire or diaspora) shape the methodology of the field? Our seminar will focus on core concepts, objects of analyses, and evolving research practices used for working in Africana Studies. This focus will require us to grapple with the difficulties of interdisciplinarity; namely, the demand to be open to multi-methodological practice as well as the demand to think consciously and nimbly about the relation between methodological practice and object of study. We will begin the seminar with two key texts of Africana Studies: Du Bois’ The Souls of Black Folk: Essays and Sketches and Frantz Fanon’s Black Skin, White Masks. Du Bois and Fanon formulate and grapple with important problematics in the history of Africana Studies. These problematics (e.g., the fecundity of cultural and political contact, exchange, and struggle) continue to occupy contemporary contributors to the field. This course fulfills the Cultural Studies foundations course requirement and counts towards the Africana Studies certificate, the American Studies concentration and the Hemispheric and Transnational Studies concentration.

ARCH
311 3248 1 4   Topics and Advanced Training: Building an Archive in a Park: SEMAP at Zamora Art House
TextbookTextbook
Romeo Guzman Thu 4:30PM -
7:30PM
McManus 31 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Archives—the textual and increasingly digital records of the past—have played essential roles in culture, society, law, and politics. Oral history, public history, and digital humanities have transformed how archives work, where they reside, who gets to use them, and how they are used. This course’s readings will explore the evolution of archival work, focusing particular attention to how archives and archivists are engaging and working with community and using digital tools and platforms. This is the theoretical part of the course. To fully flesh out the praxis aspect of the course, a bit of context is necessary. In 2012, the South El Monte Arts Posse used El Monte’s centennial anniversary to re-write its “pioneer” narrative and to center community in the production of knowledge (the building of archive, the creation of knowledge, and experiencing history). This has resulted in the book East of East: The Making of Greater El Monte, two murals, ethnic studies curriculum, zines, bike rides, as well as the digital archive semapeastofeast.com. CGU Archives 311 courses have contributed to building the digital archive, writing new biographies, and curating bike rides. Beginning in the fall of 2022, SEMAP will be housed at the Zamora Art House in Zamora Park in El Monte. This course will work with Dr. Guzmán and the SEMAP posse to build an archive of Zamora Park and its neighbors, to think deeply about the role of an archive in a park, and to document the community’s needs, wants, and desires. This course will be of interest to students committed to theory and praxis, community archives, and decolonial narratives and pedagogy. The course will hopefully meet at Zamora Art House. This course counts towards the History Department US and American Studies track, SAH American Studies concentration, Cultural Studies research tool requirement, and fulfills a requirement for History/Archival Studies MA.

ARMGT
300A 3367 1 4   Art Market Dynamics
TextbookTextbook
Erika Hirugami Thu 11:00AM -
1:50PM
Burkle 22 In-Person This course meets on Thursdays from 11am-1:50 pm. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course introduces students to the structures and dynamics of international art markets: the people, places, institutions and organizations responsible for the flow of works around the globe as well as by and through which they gain their value. In fact, value is a core organizing concept around which this course is built. What makes works of art valuable? What determines their price? Why are some artists considered relevant and others not? What confers relevance, and hence, scarcity? From the artist’s studio to art history, from the museum to the auction house, from the art fair to the international biennial, from the arts pages of the major daily newspapers to the esoteric world of academic journals, and from the law courts to insurance policies – what confers value on a work of art, and how?

ARMGT
308 3363 1 0 - 1   Arts Management On-Site (Field Study Travel)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty MonTueWedThuFri  -
No Room Needed In-Person This course is a week long intensive meeting in Mexico City during the week of March 13-17, 2023. This course is for ARMGT students only. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Arts Management on Site introduces students to the businesses, institutions, artists, innovators, and leaders that shape the art world at present through travel to both regional and international venues where the art business is at its most active. Travel is shaped by the art world calendar and its ever changing menu of events. All students are required to participate in field study travel.

ARMGT
317 3139 1 4   Finance and Accounting for Creative Industries
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 14 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Finance is the study of the allocation of capital (money) from lenders or savers to borrowers. Typically, the ultimate borrower is a firm or an entrepreneur who is attempting to build or acquire productive, profitable assets. When this process is studied from the point of view of the lender, the class is usually called "Investments". When the borrower's point of view is studied, we generally call the class "Corporate Finance." Many of the same theories are studied in both classes because these two classes are studying the same fundamental process. We will draw on many areas in constructing a method for financing a profitable corporation. Obviously finance theories are important but we will also use economics, accounting and management concepts. There are essentially two philosophies regarding the proper approach to teaching financial accounting. Perhaps the more traditional approach takes the perspective of the preparer, whereby the emphasis is on the proper recording of transactions. This debits and credits approach is very useful for anybody contemplating a career as an accountant. It is my belief that this approach is also responsible for accounting’s reputation as “"boring" and just a bunch of rules to be learned. We will be following a second teaching philosophy, whereby we study accounting from the perspective of the user/manager. The ultimate goal from this section will be for you to read and understand the output from the financial accounting process, the financial statements. While this is not a class is either statement preparation or statement analysis, we will do a little of each. Still, the goal is understand the basic rules governing the preparation of financial statements, the flexibility that exists within these rules, the possible incentives of management to make choices from within these rules, and the output from this environment.

ARMGT
351 3346 1 2 M1 Arts & Cultural Policy
TextbookTextbook
Zipporah Lax Yamamoto Wed 5:30PM -
8:20PM
No Room Needed In-Person This is an Intensive course that meets on Wednesday from 5:30pm-8:20 pm at the Pasadena Conservatory. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Cultural policy is the context in which all arts organizations and artists operate. Cultural policy shapes government and private support of the arts and is connected to a broad array of other issues such as cultural equity and inclusion, gentrification, education, advocacy, and economic development. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the importance of cultural policy, and the many ways it influences cultural production in the United States and internationally.

ARMGT
359 3138 1 4   Research and Evaluation for the Arts
TextbookTextbook
Bronwyn Mauldin Thu 5:30PM -
8:20PM
Burkle 24 In-Person Meets on Thursdays 5:30-8:20pm at the Pasadena Conservatory of Music In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class will introduce research methods and principles as they are practiced in arts management, including both qualitative and quantitative perspectives. The skills required to read, understand, analyze and utilize arts data will be explored and practiced. Works by key researchers in the arts field will be critically analyzed. Students will also engage in hands-on exercises in the classroom as well as conduct data collection in the field. The course will culminate in a student-developed research proposal that will demonstrate understanding of all stages of the process from developing a research question and collecting data to analysis and report writing.

ARMGT
377 3140 1 2 M2 Curatorial Practices
TextbookTextbook
Staff Mon 1:00PM -
3:20PM
Online Class Hybrid Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. What is a curator? What does a curator do? A not so well-defined figure, the curator has become a selector and interpreter of the art in an exhibition. The curator conceives of the exhibition thesis; plays the role of producer, manager, educator, and organizer; and is responsible for wall text and labels, catalog essays, and other exhibition support content. The curator may be called upon to help with fundraising, interact with the public and the press, and lecture and conduct seminars. As the curator’s role expands, so do the skills required to meet new challenges. The class will meet twice a week. During the Monday one-hour session, the course instructor will examine how curators and institutions conceptualize and produce exhibitions, using Adrian George’s The Curator’s Handbook and presenting relevant exhibitions. The Thursday two-hour class is dedicated to visits to and from professionals at area museums.

ARMGT
377 3140 1 2 M2 Curatorial Practices
TextbookTextbook
Staff Mon 1:00PM -
3:20PM
Online Class Hybrid Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. What is a curator? What does a curator do? A not so well-defined figure, the curator has become a selector and interpreter of the art in an exhibition. The curator conceives of the exhibition thesis; plays the role of producer, manager, educator, and organizer; and is responsible for wall text and labels, catalog essays, and other exhibition support content. The curator may be called upon to help with fundraising, interact with the public and the press, and lecture and conduct seminars. As the curator’s role expands, so do the skills required to meet new challenges. The class will meet twice a week. During the Monday one-hour session, the course instructor will examine how curators and institutions conceptualize and produce exhibitions, using Adrian George’s The Curator’s Handbook and presenting relevant exhibitions. The Thursday two-hour class is dedicated to visits to and from professionals at area museums.

ARMGT
401A 3441 1 2 - 4 M2 Capstone Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 10:00AM -
11:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person Instructor: Jean Miao This course prepares students to identify and define a capstone thesis project, and is a pre-requisite for participation in the Arts Management thesis Practicum (Course 401B). Students work individually, or in teams, to identify a project focus, craft a scope of work with an arts entity (organization, network, or collective), and outline a plan of applied study. Students gain understanding of key issues, dilemmas, and opportunities in arts management through critical reading, organizational analysis, group discussion, individual goal setting, field observations, and face-to-face meetings with arts professionals. Students define and agree on project goals with an existing arts entity, target best practices for action, and negotiate an approved scope of work. In addition to individual applied projects, students may also choose from a small group project led by a faculty mentor in service of the broader arts community.

ART
301 3110 1 1 - 3   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
David Amico Mon 11:00AM -
4:00PM
Studios In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with core faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
301 3111 2 1 - 3   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Rachel Lachowicz Tue 9:00AM -
3:00PM
Studios In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with core faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
301 3112 3 1 - 3   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Tue 9:30AM -
12:00PM
Studios In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with core faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3114 1 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Carmine Iannaccone Mon 1:00PM -
3:00PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Carmine Iannacconne In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3116 2 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Julian Hoeber Tue 12:00PM -
5:30PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Julian Hoeber In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3118 3 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Michael Reafsnyder Tue 9:00AM -
2:30PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Michael Reafsnyder In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3119 4 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Iva Gueorguieva Tue 10:00AM -
3:30PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Iva Gueorguieva In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3121 5 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Tue 9:00AM -
2:30PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Jasmine Baetz In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3123 6 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Heidi Schwegler Wed 9:00AM -
2:30PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Heidi Schewegler In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3125 7 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Amy Marie Santoferraro Fri 10:00AM -
3:00PM
Studios In-Person Instructor: Amy Santoferraro In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
329 3126 1 2   Spatial Engagement — Context, Power & Placement, Installation a Lens for All Matters
TextbookTextbook
Rachel Lachowicz Wed 10:00AM -
12:00PM
Art 126 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Context, Power & Placement encourages the production and contemplation of all kinds of aesthetic meaning through the lens of Installation. This course is focused more closely on unraveling a history of Installation Art into an idea of contemporary public exchange of art and meaning, to take on the complexity of art’s multifaceted and ever-changing spatial relationships. We will look at participation-based works, Relational installations as well as spectacle works or mega installations, the roll of art fairs, and other 21st century exhibition dynamics in contemporary art. Students will be expected to think about the participation/viewing, making, and showing of art in a variety of conditions, locations, spaces, and exhibitions. This class is smaller in scale in terms of workload and requirements than fall semester and is a 2unit class. A consistent thread through both courses being social politics and the use of different analytical frameworks and topics in order to address the works we encounter. We will also take up the multiple histories within intersectional discourse on race gender and sexuality in our global culture as it relates to course material.

ART
345 3129 1 4   Ideas in Contemporary Art
TextbookTextbook
Carmine Iannaccone Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 119 In-Person Instructor: Carmine Iannaccone In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Literature has been called the "theatre of the mind;" it is an art of pure conjury. But where reading is usually internal, solitary and disembodied, the visual arts are always external, social forms in which groups of people with actual bodies gather around tactile, material phenomena, also with actual bodies. Much scholarship has explored the zone of overlap between these two seemingly disparate art forms - the visuality of literature, the narrative power of painting/sculpture - and in this class we will indeed look at that research. But we also need a more utilitarian term to cover the shared territory and help us develop an understanding of the actual mechanisms that ally the theatre of the mind with the theatre of objects. That term is "fantasy.” In three movements, the class will identify different species of fantasy as they have flowered in our contemporary cultural ecosystems. Using the methodologies of the naturalist as our model, our goal will be to analyze these species, name them, and ask why they have taken root amongst us now. What are the favorable conditions that have made their appearance possible? How long have they been with us? How long might we predict that they will stay? And how do they transcend the supposed boundaries between visuality and the verbal?

ART
348 3141 1 4   Survey of Contemporary Art - Field Work
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Fri 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 208 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. In Survey of Contemporary Art we will do just that: survey contemporary art by visiting museums and galleries in and around Los Angeles. This is a field research seminar. Participants are expected to meet at various venues, which will be scheduled each week. In addition to discussing the exhibitions we visit, students will make oral presentations at the shows and write biweekly assessments/critiques.

ART
395 3142 1 1 - 2   Written Statement Seminar
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Art 126 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course is a workshop in which each participant produces a statement that explains your artistic goals, locates your practice in a social context, outlines the history out of which your work emerges, describes the conversation your art aims to be a part of, and defends, philosophically, your position.

ART
396 3143 1 3 - 15   MFA Project
TextbookTextbook
David Amico Tue 10:00AM -
5:00PM
Academic Computing 106 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Thesis defense with the three members of your MFA committee.

ART
396 3144 2 3 - 15   MFA Project
TextbookTextbook
Rachel Lachowicz Tue 10:00AM -
4:50PM
Art 126 In-Person Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. Thesis defense with the three members of your MFA committee.

BOT
305 3073 1 4   Plant Morphology & Anatomy
TextbookTextbook
Travis Columbus TueThu 10:00AM -
12:00PM
No Room Needed In-Person This course Meets on T/Th from 10am to 12 pm and on Wednesday from 1pm to 5 pm In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Survey of morphology (form) and anatomy (structure) in plants. Lecture and laboratory

BOT
400M 3076 1 0   Continuous Registration (MS Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

BOT
400M 3076 1 0   Continuous Registration (MS Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

BOT
401 3074 1 1   Seminar Series
TextbookTextbook
Lucinda McDade Thu 4:00PM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Students enrich their educational program by actively participating in a semester-long series of seminars presented by outstanding visiting researchers. Students are directly involved in the development of the series by inviting speakers whose research and areas of expertise parallel individual student interests. Students serve as hosts for their invited speakers, coordinating visit details with appropriate Botany program staff, students, and faculty. Students also evaluate each seminar presentation in terms of the quality of the research presented and the quality of the style of the presentation. These evaluations are discussed by all participants in several class meetings over the course of the semester.

BOT
408 3316 1 2   Special Topics in Society and Botany
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 8:00AM -
9:50AM
No Room Needed In-Person This class includes asynchronous content. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The course will examine topics in the intersection of botany and society, such as the impact of colonial history on the plant sciences, cultural traditions and indigenous plant knowledge, and on diversity and inclusion issues in the sciences.

BOT
412 3075 1 1   Special Topics in Plant Systematics: Readings in Phylogenetics
TextbookTextbook
Travis Columbus Tue 4:00PM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Review and discussion of phylogenetics based on the current literature.

BOT
499 3077 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

BOT
499 3077 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

CGH
300 3157 1 4   Theoretical Foundations in Health Promotion & Education
TextbookTextbook
Bree Hemingway Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the theoretical issues and current methodologies related to understanding and influencing health behavior change in diverse populations. The course will focus on the social and behavioral determinants of health on the individual, interpersonal, community, institutional and policy levels. The course features guest appearances by representatives from community-based organizations who relate course material to current challenges in public health practice.

CGH
300C 3158 1 4   Theoretical Foundations in Health Promotion & Education
TextbookTextbook
Bree Hemingway Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the theoretical issues and current methodologies related to understanding and influencing health behavior change in diverse populations. The course will focus on the social and behavioral determinants of health on the individual, interpersonal, community, institutional and policy levels. The course features guest appearances by representatives from community-based organizations who relate course material to current challenges in public health practice. Course registration limited to students in the Certificate in Foundations of Public Health program.

CGH
301 3159 1 4   Biostatistics
TextbookTextbook
Yusuke Shono Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Students are trained in the most commonly used statistical methods in clinical and experimental research. Students learn to select the most appropriate data analytic methods; how to apply these methods to actual data; and how to read and interpret computer output from commonly used statistical packages. In addition, the students learn to read, critique and interpret statistical concepts in the health science literature.

CGH
301C 3160 1 4   Biostatistics
TextbookTextbook
Yusuke Shono Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Students are trained in the most commonly used statistical methods in clinical and experimental research. Students learn to select the most appropriate data analytic methods; how to apply these methods to actual data; and how to read and interpret computer output from commonly used statistical packages. In addition, the students learn to read, critique and interpret statistical concepts in the health science literature. Course registration limited to students in the Certificate in Foundations of Public Health program.

CGH
303 3161 1 4   Health Services in the US & Abroad
TextbookTextbook
Rachaline Elizabeth Napier Mon 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course examines the health care delivery system to understand contemporary issues affecting the health of the American and International public and the institutions that provide health services and protect health. The course includes the historical development of various health care systems, determinants of health and health care utilization, the role of health care providers, health policy and politics, health care financing, public health, and the interactions of various components of the systems. The class emphasizes how institutions within the health care delivery system affect public health including planning, organization, administration, evaluation and policy analysis.

CGH
303C 3162 1 4   Health Services in the US & Abroad
TextbookTextbook
Rachaline Elizabeth Napier Mon 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course examines the health care delivery system to understand contemporary issues affecting the health of the American and International public and the institutions that provide health services and protect health. The course includes the historical development of various health care systems, determinants of health and health care utilization, the role of health care providers, health policy and politics, health care financing, public health, and the interactions of various components of the systems. The class emphasizes how institutions within the health care delivery system affect public health including planning, organization, administration, evaluation and policy analysis.

CGH
304 3163 1 4   Environmental & Occupational Health
TextbookTextbook
Rachaline Elizabeth Napier Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course provides a broad overview of the field of environmental and occupational health, developing a public health approach to understanding and preventing disease and disability. Students apply the principles of the biological impact pathway and environmental epidemiology to environmental and occupational health issues. Students analyze the exposure-disease continuums and disease prevention. Emphasis is placed on learning and using concepts related to the sources and behavioral determinants of exposure, the social behavioral, Physiological and genetic basis of sensitivity, and dose-response relationships.

CGH
304C 3164 1 4   Environmental & Occupational Health
TextbookTextbook
Rachaline Elizabeth Napier Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course provides a broad overview of the field of environmental and occupational health, developing a public health approach to understanding and preventing disease and disability. Students apply the principles of the biological impact pathway and environmental epidemiology to environmental and occupational health issues. Students analyze the exposure-disease continuums and disease prevention. Emphasis is placed on learning and using concepts related to the sources and behavioral determinants of exposure, the social behavioral, Physiological and genetic basis of sensitivity, and dose-response relationships.

CGH
305 3165 1 4   Seminar in Grant Writing & Proposal Development
TextbookTextbook
Jessica Noelle Clague Dehart Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous content. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The goal of this course is to provide students completing their field training an opportunity to enhance their skills in the area of grant writing and reviewing. The student will learn the steps in planning and writing the grant, understanding the funding environment, learning how to choose different types of grants, and understand the submission and review process. CGH students only; all other students by faculty permission.

CGH
306 3166 1 4   Supervised Field Training in Public Health
TextbookTextbook
Darleen Peterson  -
No Room Needed Supervision Independent Study Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for independent research with instructor guidance. The goal of the supervised field training course is to enrich students' educational training in public health by providing an opportunity to apply theory and skills acquired from their concentration to community based research and service in a practice setting. Students contribute to an agency's resources and to the solution of public health problems while developing personal confidence and leadership as a public health professional.

CGH
307 3167 1 0 - 2   Public Health Capstone
TextbookTextbook
Jamie Felicitas-Perkins  -
No Room Needed Supervision Independent Study Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for independent research with instructor guidance. The Public Health Capstone is the culminating experience for the MPH degree. Through this experience, students must demonstrate proficiency with public health core and track specific competencies. Student portfolios can be used to determine whether program student learning competencies have been met. Working with advisement from the Program Director, students will collect evidence of work in their courses and practice opportunities that have enabled them to master program competencies. Also documented are program experiences outside the classroom, including formal employment in public health, leadership skills (i.e. professional presentations, publications, professional conference attendance, professional association membership, leadership positions, and civic engagement) and a reflection of diversity and cultural competence within their role as a practitioner. Students will also prepare a scholarly paper based on requirements for their concentration.

CGH
312 3168 1 4   Data Analysis (SAS)
TextbookTextbook
Bin Xie Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Students learn how to manage and analyze data using the SAS. Topics include inputting data into SAS, preparing data from analysis, data screening to understanding distributions, detect outliers etc., hypothesis testing (e.g. t-tests, nonparametric procedures, chi-square tests, etc.), simple and multiple linear regression, techniques for building and evaluating a regression model, analysis of variance model and logistic regression.

CGH
313 3169 1 4   Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Jessica Noelle Clague Dehart Tue 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Students will gain an understanding of the principles and skills of conducting behavioral research, using qualitative and quantitative approaches commonly used in public health settings.

CGH
319 3170 1 4   Health Advocacy
TextbookTextbook
Jay Orr Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course establishes a framework within which advocacy is understood to be an essential role of the public health professional in promoting, implementing, and sustaining effective public health policy and social justice. Through case studies, readings, lectures, role plays, field research, and action planning, students will develop the skills needed to be an effective advocate for public health. Students will develop an advocacy action plan on a current public health issue.

CGH
400M 3172 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Supervision Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

CGH
401A 3173 1 4   Advanced Statistical Methods I
TextbookTextbook
Bin Xie Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is designed for graduate students in public health to learn multivariable statistical techniques frequently utilized in behavioral science research. Specific techniques cover advanced topics in regression (diagnostics, mediators and effect modifiers, logistic regression) exploratory factor analysis, growth curves and multilevel models. Prerequisite: CGH 301

CGH
403 3174 1 4   Manuscript Development
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Independent Studies Independent Study Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for independent research with instructor guidance. This course guides students through the process of writing a manuscript for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Students learn to evaluate the existing health literature to formulate new hypotheses, conduct statistical analysis on health-related data to test the hypotheses, interpret the results, and present the theoretical and applied implications of their findings. Students gain experience in scientific writing and graphical presentation of results. The course also familiarizes students with the process of submitting manuscripts to scientific journals.

CGH
405 3175 1 4   Seminar in Grant Writing & Proposal Development (Doctoral)
TextbookTextbook
Jessica Noelle Clague Dehart Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The goal of this course is to provide students completing their field training an opportunity to enhance their skills in the area of grant writing and reviewing. The student will learn the steps in planning and writing the grant, understanding the funding environment, learning how to choose different types of grants, and understand the submission and review process. Course can be taken for either 2 or 4 units. CGH students only; all other students by faculty permission.

CGH
407C 3176 1 0   Advanced Integrative Practicum in Public Health (Project)
TextbookTextbook
Jamie Felicitas-Perkins  -
No Room Needed Independent Studies Independent Study Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for independent research with instructor guidance. The advanced integrative practicum in public health is comprised of three incremental practice experiences engaging students in health system leadership and management and complementing the DrPH didactic curriculum. The integrative practicum begins with an introduction to the health system, continues with interactive instruction from experts in public health, and culminates in a high-level practice-based project. This course is the third in the series of three experiences. Through placement with an external entity, students synthesize, integrate and apply the skills, knowledge and training to develop and complete a significant project that is meaningful for the organization and to advance public health practice. [Pre-requisite: CGH 407B (1 semester)]

CGH
412 3177 1 4   Community Based Translational Research to Promote Population Health
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 2:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 108 Hybrid This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course will provide doctoral students in public health and health promotion sciences with knowledge and practical skills relevant to the purposes, design, execution, and interpretation of community based translational research relative to chronic diseases as driven by tobacco and other substance abuse, diet, physical activity, stress, and environmental exposures. A personalized ecological model will frame the organization, readings, discussions, and field research.

CGH
413 3178 1 4   Research Methods (Doctoral)
TextbookTextbook
Jessica Noelle Clague Dehart Tue 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronos content. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Students will gain an understanding of the principles and skills of conducting behavioral research, using qualitative and quantitative approaches commonly used in public health settings.

CGH
415 3179 1 4   Fundamentals of Population Health
TextbookTextbook
Rachaline Elizabeth Napier Fri 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This class will focus on how to identify high utilizing, complex patients receiving services from multiple County departments and how to care for them in a coordinated way. Fragmentation of care is common and is not optimal for patients with limited resources. This class will explore the role of social determinants, quality of intervention(s), accessibility of services, and the ability to share a common electronic platform to inform caregivers and improve health in in various populations.

CGH
418 3180 1 4   Health Equity in Research and Practice
TextbookTextbook
Paula Palmer Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This class will focus on how to identify high utilizing, complex patients receiving services from multiple County departments and how to care for them in a coordinated way. Fragmentation of care is common and is not optimal for patients with limited resources. This class will explore the role of social determinants, quality of intervention(s), accessibility of services, and the ability to share a common electronic platform to inform caregivers and improve health in in various populations.

CGH
490 3181 1 1 - 4   Directed Research
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Directed Research Instructional Mode Description: No or very minimal meetings. Used for group research projects with instructor guidance, or for committee guidance for dissertation. Directed research study for graduate students

CGH
499 3317 1 0   Doctoral Study (DrPH and PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Supervision Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

CLST
315 3238 1 4   Concepts & Methods of Africana Studies
TextbookTextbook
Darrell Moore Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 119 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. In Concepts & Methods in Africana Studies we will read and discuss the contributions of five contemporary thinkers in the field: Édouard Glissant, Saidiya Hartman, Achille Mbembe, Fred Moten, and Hortense Spillers. Our discussions will be attentive to the following question: how does each thinker conceptualize her/his object of analysis? This question contains two concerns: how and what? The question how Africana thinkers do what they do is a concern of method. How does the field of Africana Studies (and Africana intellectual practices generally) bring its objects of study into being? How does any singular object of study (e.g., freedom or desire or diaspora) shape the methodology of the field? Our seminar will focus on core concepts, objects of analyses, and evolving research practices used for working in Africana Studies. This focus will require us to grapple with the difficulties of interdisciplinarity; namely, the demand to be open to multi-methodological practice as well as the demand to think consciously and nimbly about the relation between methodological practice and object of study. We will begin the seminar with two key texts of Africana Studies: Du Bois’ The Souls of Black Folk: Essays and Sketches and Frantz Fanon’s Black Skin, White Masks. Du Bois and Fanon formulate and grapple with important problematics in the history of Africana Studies. These problematics (e.g., the fecundity of cultural and political contact, exchange, and struggle) continue to occupy contemporary contributors to the field. This course fulfills the Cultural Studies foundations course requirement and counts towards the Africana Studies certificate, the American Studies concentration and the Hemispheric and Transnational Studies concentration.

CLST
317 3231 1 4   Mapping Latino/a/x Studies
TextbookTextbook
David Luis-Brown Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
IAC Library In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. How have Latinxs transformed the fabric of the United States? Moving through a series of case studies on successive waves of Latinization major U.S. sites of Latinidad—including Chicago, Los Angeles and greater New York--as well as topics such as the borderlands, immigration, and hemispheric approaches to U.S. culture, this course interweaves an analysis of ethnography, film, geography, graphic novels, historiography, music, the novel, popular culture, sociology, and visual culture, playing close attention to specific genres and discourses of writing and artistic creation—the content of the form. This course meets the requirements for the concentrations in American Studies and Hemispheric and Transnational Studies.

CLST
372 3232 1 4   Marx, Marxism, Cultural Studies
TextbookTextbook
Darrell Moore Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 35 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This seminar will be divided into two parts. In the first part, we will read and discuss influential themes of Marx’s (and Marx and Engels’) philosophy, including his theory of human natural and flourishing, theory of ideology, critique of capitalism. In the second part of seminar, we will turn our attention to how those who labor in the field of Cultural Studies have incorporated, developed, and critiqued Marx’s ideas. We will pay particular attention to theories of ideology (e.g., Lukacs, Gramsci, Althusser, Hall), art and aesthetics (e.g., Benjamin, Adorno), and decolonial theory (e.g., Fanon, Robinson, Spivak). This course fulfills the Cultural Studies foundations course requirement

CLST
400M 3318 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Supervision Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

CLST
407 3233 1 4   Exile in Cinema
TextbookTextbook
Isabel Balseiro Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 208 In-Person Instructor: Isabel Balseiro In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. A thematic and formal study of literary and cinematic responses to the experience of exile. Exile provokes a rupture with one’s origins that entails both a personal and a historical process. How does exile effect a change of relationship between individual and society, homeland and site of displacement, home language and adopted tongue? This course examines how writers and filmmakers bridge an often-painful historical process through creativity. We will analyze work from Africa (Senegal, Mali, Guinea,Tunisia); Latin America and the Caribbean (Argentina, Cuba, Haiti), Asia (Hong Kong, Vietnam) and Europe (France). This Course satisfies the Media Studies Concentration requirement

CLST
412 3236 1 4   Afro-Latin/Latinx America
TextbookTextbook
Martha M Arguello Thu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 119 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class traces how the anthropological study of African-descended people in the Americas shifted from scientific racism and notions of "savagery" to elevating "New World Africans" as exemplars of creolization, transculturation, acculturation, syncretism, and hybridity. The treatment of African-descended peoples as a historical community worthy of social scientific analysis set the stage for the development of Black Studies, African Studies, and African Diasporic Studies throughout the twentieth century. The second part of the class examines contemporary scholarship in the socio-cultural anthropology of African-descended communities, religious traditions, and musical genres. This course satisfies the Transnational and Hemispheric Studies requirement

CLST
415 3241 1 4   Ethnographic Field Research Methods in Cultural Studies
TextbookTextbook
Paul Faulstich Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 31 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course provides an introduction to a range of strategies for field research in cultural studies, including participant observation, life histories, interviewing, socio-linguistic analysis, and other qualitative methods. At the heart of the course are two concerns: the opportunity for students to immerse themselves in coming to understand particular field situations, and the broader question of how the textually-derived approaches more characteristic of cultural studies can be articulated with and enriched by such field experience. This course satisfies a Cultural Studies Research Methods Requirement

CLST
427 3243 1 4   Culture, Science and Technology
TextbookTextbook
Lucia Cantero Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Science, broadly defined, is the human capacity over nature to propel progress. The notion of technology largely involves this very intention; that which is made “instrumental.” This course critically examines the manmade relationship to consider how culture emerges from these processes, with the premise that we must, quite literally as infra means under, go beneath their surface to consider forms of sociotechnical power in relation to distributional justice and inequality. Using various infrastructures as case studies, we consider the complex ways that technology (the ideological and material reality of systems and structures) fosters a cultural politics of inclusion and exclusion. How do these processes frame our notions of the body, race, gender, and class? Case studies to be explored range from agricultural systems, shopping malls, to contemporary social media and Big Tech.

CLST
456 3340 1 4   Caring about Heritage: Theory, Conservation and Interpretation of Historic House Museums
TextbookTextbook
Denise Maior Barron, Edward Richmond Bosley Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Online Course Instructors are Edward Bosley, Denise Maior-Barron Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course focuses on historic house museums and their landscapes analyzed in the wider theoretical context of heritage and tourism. Through case studies grounded in relevant theory, and including other conceptually related historic institutions and sites as backdrop for analysis, the course covers topics pertinent to contemporary heritage issues and debates about modes of conservation and particularly interpretation in a globalized yet increasingly fragmented society. Caught between conservation and tourism, cultural heritage providers are left to find much needed balance for achieving valuable heritage interpretation while also delivering “authentic” tourist experiences. This course aims to provide theoretical and practical solutions to such dilemmas, particularly when dissonant heritage exists, with reconciliation playing a key role in interpretive plans. This course satisfies the Museum Studies Concentration course requirement.

CLST
470 3245 1 4   Advanced Writing Workshop: MA Thesis, Dissertation Proposal, and Publishing
TextbookTextbook
Ruqayya Khan Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
McManus 31 In-Person Instructor: Ruqayya Khan In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The dynamic of the class is not a traditional seminar setting; instead it is designed as a writers’ workshop in which students serve as peer-evaluators and class-time is for workshopping individual writing projects. Students will develop their own original project that can be a final MA publishable paper, thesis/dissertation proposal, article for publication, literature review, or thesis/dissertation chapter. There are two aims of this course. The first is to discuss and workshop academic writing and publication strategies including (but not limited to): research practices and the mechanics of writing, including argumentation, significance and contestability, and structure. The second objective is to foster academic professionalization by identifying presentation and publication opportunities, and by examining and practicing grant writing, applications to PhD programs (for M.A. students), and the academic job application process (cover letters, C.V.s, teaching statements). The primary written assignment sequence will build your writing, block by block, toward a complete finished paper. All in-class sessions are structured as workshops and are geared toward teaching you how to give and receive generous collegial feedback. Workshops are not meant to be intimidating nor competitive, they will promote academic collegiality, intellectual generosity, and will teach you how to be brave enough to have your work critiqued and read in front of colleagues. While not required for Ph.D. students in Cultural Studies, they may find it useful for developing their writing. This class is required for Cultural Studies MA students.

CLST
499 3319 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Supervision Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

ECON
302 3145 1 4   Modern Macroeconomics: Analysis, Policy and Applications
TextbookTextbook
Graham Bird Wed 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Online The course will have a weekly asynchronous component. Students will receive information via canvas Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Macroeconomics is the study of 'aggregates', including national output and economic growth, employment/ unemployment, inflation, and the balance of payments. Governments and other policy making agencies have targets with respect to these aggregates, and use policy instruments, such as fiscal and monetary policy, to try and achieve them. In order to design policy appropriately, it is important to understand how economies work. However, economies are very complex. Therefore, economists have developed theoretical models to simplify things. Considerable debate surrounds which model gives the most accurate representation of the real world. Moreover, ideas evolve over time and as circumstances change. This course examines the state of modern macroeconomics and its evolution. The course is analytically rigorous and draws on empirical evidence but without being highly technical. Furthermore, it explores the political influences that affect the design of macroeconomic policy. Having begun with an overview which traces out the interaction between theory, policy and performance, the course is divided into sections that explain and analyze: the main macroeconomic policy targets; the range of macroeconomic models, running from the classical model through to Keynesianism, monetarism, new classical macroeconomics, new Keynesian economics and modern monetary theory; fiscal and monetary policy; and applications of the analysis in the context of the economic and financial crisis in 2008/09 and the COVID 19 pandemic and its aftermath. The course is a core course for the Masters and Doctoral programs in the Department of Economic Sciences, but should also be of interest and relevance to students of politics and international studies.

ECON
312 3341 1 4   Behavioral Neuroscience of Decision Making
TextbookTextbook
Paul Zak Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 22 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course introduces students to behavioral neuroscience in order to inform their research in the social sciences and humanities. There is no prerequisite. It begins with lectures on how the brain works and then reviews current research on how decisions are made in the brain, including neuroeconomics, neuropolitics, neuroethics and more. There are also several field trips where students participate in live experiments measuring brain activity

ECON
317 3146 1 4   Game Theory and Asymmetric Information
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Monica Capra Seoane Tue 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 208 Hybrid The course will have a weekly asynchronous component. Students will receive information via canvas. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course provides an introduction to graduate-level game theory and asymmetric information and is designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. This course will cover static and dynamic games of complete information, static and dynamic games of incomplete information, adverse selection, moral hazard, screening, and cheap talk.

ECON
377B 3147 1 4   Law & Economics
TextbookTextbook
Bryan Chris McCannon Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course will consider a range of issues in empirical and theoretical law and economics. We will start the course by discussing the theoretical models that underpin research in empirical law and economics. The course will then focus on empirical methods that have been applied to the study of legal issues. Topics that will be discussed include the response of criminal activity to capital punishment, police activity, legal changes, adjustments in norms, etc. We will also focus on issues relating to the plea bargaining process and the implications of this process of criminal behavior. Additionally, we will focus on issues in civil litigation, which will involve bargaining, mergers and contract law. Special attention will be given to efforts to identify causality.

ECON
382 3344 1 4   Econometrics I
TextbookTextbook
Pierangelo De Pace Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 214 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Review of probability theory and statistical inference. The general linear model under the classical assumptions. Multicollinearity, dummy variables, model selection, and nonspherical disturbances. Prerequisite: ECON 308.

ECON
386 3343 1 4   Advanced Applied Econometrics
TextbookTextbook
Anthony Scott Cunningham Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course acts as a capstone to the econometrics sequence in the Department of Economic Sciences. During the semester the students will identify a research project that they intend to include in their thesis. The data will be acquired during the semester by using crawling techniques, which will be taught in an intensive 3 day seminar at the beginning of the semester. The remainder of the semester will be designed as an intensive project with consistent feedback to perform a causal policy evaluation. All students will engage in the enhancing the quality of the research of all other student's in the course by working collaboratively and experientially on one another's programming, interpretation, and writing of the results of the analysis.

ECON
400M 3361 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon  -
No Room Needed Supervision Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

ECON
420A 3148 1 4   Behavioral Economics Incubator I
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Tasoff Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 208 In-Person This course will have a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Behavioral Economics Incubator will bring students to the research-producing phase of their PhD. Faculty will work directly with students on a research project aimed for scientific publication. This is the first part of a two-course sequence that takes place over the spring and the subsequent fall term. No class is offered during the summer term as part of this sequence.

ECON
450 3355 1 2   Research Workshop on International Money, Finance, Development and Economic Policy
TextbookTextbook
Graham Bird Fri 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online Class will meet bi-weekly on 1/27; 2/10; 2/24; 3/10; 3/24; 4/7; 4/21; and 5/5 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The workshop is designed to help students who are planning to embark upon, or have already embarked upon writing a doctoral dissertation in the fields of international money and financial economics or international economic and development policy. It is required for all PhD students taking these fields. The workshop will discuss methodological issues such as research techniques and data issues. Sessions of the workshop will cover both specific research topics and current policy issues. The discussion will be heavily based on presentations on specific topics given by students. In addition, presentations will sometimes be given by the workshop conveners and by guest speakers. There will also be 'round table' group discussions of key recent research articles, as well as contemporary economic policy issues. The workshop will help students to learn to critique papers in an effective manner and prepare for their dissertation proposals and defenses. It will also give them experience in presenting their ideas in a 'conference style' and in answering questions from an audience of their peers. It will give guidance on preparing research papers for consideration by academic journals as well as by policy makers in governmental, international and commercial organizations.

ECON
499 3362 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Directed Research Instructional Mode Description: No or very minimal meetings. Used for group research projects with instructor guidance, or for committee guidance for dissertation. Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EDUC
PCU118 3066 1 1 - 2   Prof Development: Social Justice Competencies
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 5:30PM -
7:20PM
Online Class Online Online class will meet synchronously from 5:30-7:30pm on select Mondays: 1/23, 2/27, 3/20, 4/24 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. A professional development training session by CGU staff and guest speakers for Mentor Teachers and Site Support Providers. Training will include how to coach new teachers as they implement Social Justice Competencies into their teaching practice. One to two PCUs may be earned for participation.

EDUC
PCU127 3062 1 3   American Indian Language & Culture Credential (AILCC) Foundations
TextbookTextbook
Eliud Partida Wed 4:00PM -
7:50PM
Harper 1 In-Person Class meets from 4-8pm on select Wednesdays: 1/25, 2/8, 2/22, 3/8, 3/22, 4/5, 4/19, 5/3 In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. As the second course in a series of three, participants will gain knowledge, skills, & capacities to deliver culturally and linguistically responsive instruction.

EDUC
PCUI1 3065 1 6 - 10   Clinical Induction I
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Supervision Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This class is for teachers in the first term of CGU's Induction Program. This clinical course is aligned to FACT and strives to help the novice teacher reflect upon and develop in his/her teaching acumen. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
PCUI2 3063 1 6 - 10   Clinical Induction. II
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Supervision Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This class is for teachers in the second term of CGU's Induction Program. This clinical course is aligned to FACT and strives to help the novice teacher reflect upon and develop in his/her teaching acumen.

EDUC
PCUI4 3064 1 6   Clinical Induction. IV
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Supervision Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This class is for teachers in the last term of CGU's Induction Program. This clinical course is aligned to FACT and strives to help the novice teacher reflect upon and develop in his/her teaching acumen.

EDUC
301 3029 1 4   Teach Learn Process for Equity And Social Justice 1 MtplSub
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Class meets online from 4-7pm on Wednesday. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a TK-6 setting. This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program.

EDUC
301A 3048 1 2   Pre-Teaching Experience - Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueWedThu 7:30AM -
3:00PM
Online Class Supervision Clinical class meets from 7:30am-3:00pm on TWTh from 2/13 through 4/28. Dates/times may vary based on the school site's calendar. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This is the clinical class associated with Phase I of CGU's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential Program. In this introductory clinical class, Multiple Subject candidates are paired with a CGU Mentor Teacher in a 10 week clinical setting to start developing proficiency per the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs). This course focuses on methodology and application of instructional strategies across the multiple subject areas. There is specific emphasis on literacy for all students, including English Learners and students with special needs. Course content includes: systematic instructional strategies, monitoring student progress and providing feedback, motivating students, establishing positive classroom communities, establishing classroom expectations and procedures, instructional planning, and understanding child development as it relates to behavior and learning. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
301ASE 3050 1 2   Pre-Teaching Experience Special Education Extensive Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueWedThu 7:30AM -
3:00PM
Online Class Supervision Clinical class meets from 7:30am-3:00pm on TWTh from 2/13 through 4/28. Dates/times may vary based on the school site's calendar. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This is the clinical class associated with Phase I of CGU's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential Program. In this introductory clinical class, Education Specialist (extensive support needs) candidates are paired with a CGU Mentor Teacher in a 10 week clinical setting to start developing per the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs). This course focuses on methodology and application of instructional strategies across the multiple subject areas for students with extensive support needs. There is specific emphasis on literacy for all students with support needs, including English Learners. Course content includes: systematic instructional strategies, monitoring student progress and providing feedback, motivating students, establishing positive classroom communities, establishing classroom expectations and procedures, instructional planning, meeting IEP goals and objectives, and understanding the multiple domains of child development including physical, cognitive, and social-emotional growth and wellness. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
301ASM 3049 1 2   Pre-Teaching Experience Special Education Mild/Mod Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueWedThu 7:30AM -
3:00PM
Online Class Supervision Clinical class meets from 7:30am-3:00pm on TWTh from 2/13 through 4/28. Dates/times may vary based on the school site's calendar. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This is the clinical class associated with Phase I of CGU's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential Program. In this introductory clinical class, Education Specialist (mild/moderate support needs) candidates are paired with a CGU Mentor Teacher in a 10 week clinical setting to start developing per the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs). This course focuses on methodology and application of instructional strategies across the multiple subject areas for students with mild/moderate support needs. There is specific emphasis on literacy for all students with support needs, including English Learners. Course content includes: systematic instructional strategies, monitoring student progress and providing feedback, motivating students, establishing positive classroom communities, establishing classroom expectations and procedures, instructional planning, meeting IEP goals and objectives, and understanding the multiple domains of child development including physical, cognitive, and social-emotional growth and wellness. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
301G 3032 1 4   Teaching and Learning for Equity And Social Justice. MtplSub
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is for undergraduate seniors at the Claremont Colleges who plan to enroll in Claremont Graduate University's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential & MA Program.  This 14-month program prepares K-12 teachers to work in elementary, middle and high schools as general education and special education teachers.  This accelerated/4+1 class cannot be taken pass/fail. Aligned with the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE), this course aims to prepare candidates for teaching positions in multiple subject (Elementary) settings. This course provides students with an introduction to research-based principles of teaching and learning with particular emphasis placed on the practical implications of effective lesson planning, classroom management, culturally responsive teaching practices, assessment, and effective strategies for reaching all students in diverse settings. Course requirements and expectations will be handed out at the beginning of the class. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching. Students with questions about the course or CGU’s Teacher Education Program are encouraged to contact CGU’s Department of Teacher Education at 909/621-8076.

EDUC
301GS 3033 1 4   Teaching and Learning for Equity And Social Justice. SPED
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is for undergraduate seniors at the Claremont Colleges who plan to enroll in Claremont Graduate University's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential & MA Program.  This 14-month program prepares K-12 teachers to work in elementary, middle and high schools as general education and special education teachers.  This accelerated/4+1 class cannot be taken pass/fail. This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. Aligned with Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE), this course aims to prepare candidates for teaching positions in special education settings. This course provides students with an introduction to research-based principles of teaching and learning with particular emphasis placed on the practical implications of effective lesson planning, classroom management, culturally responsive teaching practices, assessment, and effective strategies for reaching all students in diverse settings. Course requirements and expectations will be handed out at the beginning of the class.  In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching. Students with questions about the course or CGU’s Teacher Education Program are encouraged to contact CGU’s Department of Teacher Education at 909/621-8076.

EDUC
301P 3421 1 0   Pre-Teach Learn Process 1
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is for undergraduate seniors who plan to enroll in Claremont Graduate University's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential & MA Program as a Student on Special Standing. This 14-month program prepares K-12 teachers to work in elementary, middle and high schools as general education and special education teachers. This course cannot be taken pass/fail. This course is part 1 of the first academic course in CGU’s Teacher Preparation Program, TLP I for those interested in earning a Multiple Subject credential. It is designed to prepare teachers to create positive classroom environments and design/implement active rather than passive learning activities that foster academic excellence in K-12 youth. The course builds an awareness in teacher candidates of the special challenges and rewards of teaching in a multicultural environment and addresses the planning required for optimal learning.  Course requirements and expectations will be handed out at the beginning of the class. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching. Students with questions about the course or CGU’s Teacher Education Program are encouraged to contact CGU’s Department of Teacher Education at 909/621-8076.

EDUC
301S 3031 1 4   Teach Learn Process for Equity And Social Justice 1 SPED
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a special education K-12 setting. This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. Aligned with the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE), this course aims to prepare candidates for teaching positions in special education settings (mild/moderate and moderate/severe), including inclusive and mainstream environments. This course provides students with an introduction to research-based principles of teaching and learning with particular emphasis placed on the practical implications of effective lesson planning, classroom management, culturally responsive teaching practices, assessment, and effective strategies for reaching all students in diverse settings. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
302 3030 1 4   Teach Learn Process for Equity And Social Justice 1 SnglSub
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a single-subject settings (typically at the middle- or high-school level). This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. Aligned with the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE), this course aims to prepare candidates for teaching positions in single-subject classrooms. This course provides students with an introduction to research-based principles of teaching and learning with particular emphasis placed on the practical implications of effective lesson planning, classroom management, culturally responsive teaching practices, assessment, and effective strategies for reaching all students in diverse settings. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
302A 3051 1 2   Pre-Teaching Experience - Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueWedThu 7:30AM -
3:00PM
Online Class Supervision Clinical class meets from 7:30am-3:00pm on TWTh from 2/13 through 4/28. Dates/times may vary based on the school site's calendar. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This is the clinical class associated with Phase I of CGU's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential Program. In this introductory clinical class, single-subject candidates are paired with a CGU Mentor Teacher in a discipline-specific 10 week clinical setting to start developing proficiency per the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs). This course focuses on methodology and application of instructional strategies across content-specific subject areas. There is specific emphasis on literacy for all students, including English Learners and students with special needs. Course content includes: systematic instructional strategies, monitoring student progress and providing feedback, motivating students, establishing positive classroom communities, establishing classroom expectations and procedures, instructional planning, and understanding child development as it relates to behavior and learning. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
302G 3034 1 4   Teaching and Learning for Equity And Social Justice. SnglSub
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is for undergraduate seniors at the Claremont Colleges who plan to enroll in Claremont Graduate University's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential & MA Program.  This 14-month program prepares K-12 teachers to work in elementary, middle and high schools as general education and special education teachers.  This accelerated/4+1 class cannot be taken pass/fail. Aligned with the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE), this course aims to prepare candidates for teaching positions in single subject (English, Math, Science, etc.) settings. This course provides students with an introduction to research-based principles of teaching and learning with particular emphasis placed on the practical implications of effective lesson planning, classroom management, culturally responsive teaching practices, assessment, and effective strategies for reaching all students in diverse settings. Course requirements and expectations will be handed out at the beginning of the class. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching. Students with questions about the course or CGU’s Teacher Education Program are encouraged to contact CGU’s Department of Teacher Education at 909/621-8076.

EDUC
305 3024 1 2   Teaching & Learning Process III: Instructional Intensity & Support for All Learners: Multiple Subj
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez, Samara Suafoa Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Online Class meets from 5-8pm on select Tuesdays: 1/17, 1/31, 2/14, 2/28, 3/21, 4/4, 4/18, 5/2 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. TLP III (the third in a four-part series) is designed to continue preparing candidates for working towards social justice within the K-12 educational system. The course provides the context for candidates to deepen their understandings of students, their families and their funds of knowledge, and the school/community culture of their first teaching assignments.  In TLP III, candidates will explore the concept of social justice through the lens of restorative justice practices as well as culturally relevant teaching and racial inquiry. We will explore how/why access to technology can be an empowerment tool to improve both teaching and learning.  Education Specialist candidates and General Education candidates will have the opportunity to develop a Professional Learning Community and learn about best practices for students with special needs. Finally, all candidates will improve their competencies in creating and maintaining effective environments for student learning by analyzing the intersection of socio-emotional learning, trauma, and healing-centered engagement. In TLP III, candidates will actively work against the concept of low level, “thin curriculum” (Delpit, 2013) by designing challenging curricula predicated on the cultural and linguistic assets of their students as well as strong content and pedagogical knowledge.

EDUC
305B 3052 1 1   Student Teaching 2: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
Staff Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
To Be Determined Supervision Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/18, 3/25, 4/15. In addition, a synchronous online Clinical Practicum is required for all residents from 5:30-7:30pm on select Mondays: 1/23, 2/27, 3/20, 4/24 Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions.  This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305B 3052 1 1   Student Teaching 2: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
Staff Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
To Be Determined Supervision Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/18, 3/25, 4/15. In addition, a synchronous online Clinical Practicum is required for all residents from 5:30-7:30pm on select Mondays: 1/23, 2/27, 3/20, 4/24 Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions.  This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305BSE 3054 1 1   Student Teaching 2: Special Education Extensive Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
No Room Needed Supervision Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/18, 3/25, 4/15. In addition, a synchronous online Clinical Practicum is required for all residents from 5:30-7:30pm on select Mondays: 1/23, 2/27, 3/20, 4/24 Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions. This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305BSM 3053 1 1   Student Teaching 2: Special Education Mild/Moderate Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
No Room Needed Supervision Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/18, 3/25, 4/15. In addition, a synchronous online Clinical Practicum is required for all residents from 5:30-7:30pm on select Mondays: 1/23, 2/27, 3/20, 4/24 Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions.  This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305C 3056 1 1   Residency Teaching 2: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
Stauffer 110 Hybrid Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/25, 3/25, 4/15. In addition, a synchronous online Clinical Practicum is required for all residents from 5:30-7:30pm on select Mondays: 1/23, 2/27, 3/20, 4/24 Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns. EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents. This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III. Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll. The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305CSE 3058 1 1   Residency Teaching 2: Special Education Extensive Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
No Room Needed Hybrid Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/25, 3/25, 4/15. In addition, a synchronous online Clinical Practicum is required for all residents from 5:30-7:30pm on select Mondays: 1/23, 2/27, 3/20, 4/24 Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This class is for candidates working in schools as “interns” or “residents.”  EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns.  EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents.  This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III.   Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll.  The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305CSM 3057 1 1   Residency Teaching 2: Special Education Mild/Moderate Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
No Room Needed Hybrid Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/25, 3/25, 4/15. In addition, a synchronous online Clinical Practicum is required for all residents from 5:30-7:30pm on select Mondays: 1/23, 2/27, 3/20, 4/24 Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This class is for candidates working in schools as “interns” or “residents.”  EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns.  EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents.  This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III.   Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll.  The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305S 3025 1 2   Teaching & Learning Process III: Instructional Intensity & Support for All Learners : Special Ed
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez, Samara Suafoa Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Online Class meets from 5-8pm on select Tuesdays: 1/17,1/31,2/14,2/28,3/21,4/4,4/18,5/2 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. TLP III (the third in a four-part series) is designed to continue preparing candidates for working towards social justice within the K-12 educational system. The course provides the context for candidates to deepen their understandings of students, their families and their funds of knowledge, and the school/community culture of their first teaching assignments.  In TLP III, candidates will explore the concept of social justice through the lens of restorative justice practices as well as culturally relevant teaching and racial inquiry. We will explore how/why access to technology can be an empowerment tool to improve both teaching and learning.  Education Specialist candidates and General Education candidates will have the opportunity to develop a Professional Learning Community and learn about best practices for students with special needs. Finally, all candidates will improve their competencies in creating and maintaining effective environments for student learning by analyzing the intersection of socio-emotional learning, trauma, and healing-centered engagement. In TLP III, candidates will actively work against the concept of low level, “thin curriculum” (Delpit, 2013) by designing challenging curricula predicated on the cultural and linguistic assets of their students as well as strong content and pedagogical knowledge.

EDUC
306 3026 1 2   Teaching & Learning Process III: Instructional Intensity & Support for All Learners: Single Subj
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez, Samara Suafoa Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Online Class meets from 5-8pm on select Tuesdays: 1/17,1/31,2/14,2/28,3/21,4/4,4/18,5/2 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. TLP III (the third in a four-part series) is designed to continue preparing candidates for working towards social justice within the K-12 educational system. The course provides the context for candidates to deepen their understandings of students, their families and their funds of knowledge, and the school/community culture of their first teaching assignments.  In TLP III, candidates will explore the concept of social justice through the lens of restorative justice practices as well as culturally relevant teaching and racial inquiry. We will explore how/why access to technology can be an empowerment tool to improve both teaching and learning.  Education Specialist candidates and General Education candidates will have the opportunity to develop a Professional Learning Community and learn about best practices for students with special needs. Finally, all candidates will improve their competencies in creating and maintaining effective environments for student learning by analyzing the intersection of socio-emotional learning, trauma, and healing-centered engagement. In TLP III, candidates will actively work against the concept of low level, “thin curriculum” (Delpit, 2013) by designing challenging curricula predicated on the cultural and linguistic assets of their students as well as strong content and pedagogical knowledge.

EDUC
306A 3060 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
Staff Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
No Room Needed Hybrid Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/25, 3/25, 4/15. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This class is for candidates working in schools as “interns” or “residents.”  EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns.  EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents.  This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III.   Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll.  The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
306A 3060 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
Staff Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
No Room Needed Hybrid Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/25, 3/25, 4/15. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This class is for candidates working in schools as “interns” or “residents.”  EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns.  EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents.  This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III.   Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll.  The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
306B 3055 1 1   Student Teaching 2. Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
No Room Needed Supervision Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/18, 3/25, 4/15. In addition, a synchronous online Clinical Practicum is required for all residents from 5:30-7:30pm on select Mondays: 1/23, 2/27, 3/20, 4/24 Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions.  This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
306C 3059 1 1   Residency Teaching 2: Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
Academic Computing 108 Supervision Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/25, 3/25, 4/15. In addition, a synchronous online Clinical Practicum is required for all residents from 5:30-7:30pm on select Mondays: 1/23, 2/27, 3/20, 4/24 Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. This class is for candidates working in schools as “interns” or “residents.”  EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns.  EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents.  This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III.   Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll.  The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
309CSM 3061 1 2   Residency: Special Education Adding Mild/Moderate Support Needs
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
3:00PM
No Room Needed Supervision Clinical course with advising and clinical support off site and online. Additionally, class meets in-person on select Saturdays: 9a-3p on 1/21, 2/18, 3/25, 4/15. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. During residency teaching, education specialists work in the special education classroom under the supervision of a trained CGU Master Teacher where they receive personal mentoring. The faculty advisor assists the residency teacher with practical aspects of teaching and then moves them into more theoretical paradigms as they learn and grow as a teacher. Candidate must show proficiency in the Teacher Performance Expectations to pass this course.

EDUC
324-2 3027 1 4   Literacy & Methods 2: Gen Ed Elem & K-12 SPED
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Jane Canham Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Class meets from 5-8pm on select Tuesdays: 1/24, 2/7, 2/21, 3/7, 3/28, 4/11, 4/25, 5/9 with asynch modules on the week of 1/26, 2/23, 4/13 and 5/11 Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This class includes asynchronous content. Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching and, b) general education elementray pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by “warm demanders” (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
326-2 3028 1 4   Literacy & Methods 2: English
TextbookTextbook
Kimberly A Kemmer Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Harper 1 Hybrid Class meets from 5-8pm on select Tuesdays: 1/24, 2/7, 2/21, 3/7, 3/28, 4/11, 4/25, 5/9 with asynch modules on the week of 1/26, 2/23, 4/13 and 5/11 Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This class includes asynchronous content. Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching, b) English and Social Science pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by "warm demanders" (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
327-2 3037 1 4   Literacy & Methods 2: World Languages
TextbookTextbook
Christine M Rodriguez Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Harper 63 Hybrid Class meets from 5-8pm on select Tuesdays: 1/24, 2/7, 2/21, 3/7, 3/28, 4/11, 4/25, 5/9 with asynch modules on the week of 1/26, 2/23, 4/13 and 5/11 Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching and, b) world language pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by "warm demanders" (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
348-2 3035 1 4   Literacy & Methods 2: Science
TextbookTextbook
Leena Bakshi Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Harper 65 Hybrid Class meets from 5-8pm on select Tuesdays: 1/24, 2/7, 2/21, 3/7, 3/28, 4/11, 4/25, 5/9 with asynch modules on the week of 1/26, 2/23, 4/13 and 5/11 Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This class includes asynchronous content. Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching and, b) science pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by "warm demanders" (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
349-2 3036 1 4   Literacy & Methods 2: Mathematics
TextbookTextbook
Shih-Yi Feng Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Harper 61 Hybrid Class meets from 5-8pm on select Tuesdays: 1/24, 2/7, 2/21, 3/7, 3/28, 4/11, 4/25, 5/9 with asynch modules on the week of 1/26, 2/23, 4/13 and 5/11 Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This class includes asynchronous content. Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching and, b) mathematics pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by "warm demanders" (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
353-2 3370 1 4   Literacy & Methods 2: Social Science
TextbookTextbook
Elizabeth Ramos Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Online Class meets from 5-8pm on select Tuesdays: 1/24, 2/7, 2/21, 3/7, 3/28, 4/11, 4/25, 5/9 with asynch modules on the week of 1/26, 2/23, 4/13 and 5/11 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This class includes asynchronous content. Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching and, b) social science pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by "warm demanders" (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
356 3397 1 2 M2 Seminar 2: Teaching-Learning Communities for CNA Fellows
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez ThuFriSat  -
Blaisdell 7 In-Person Class meets in person for approx 3 full days for an intensive seminar between May 10-13th. Additionally students are required to attend monthly advising sessions with their mentor/advisor. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This is the second course in a series designed specifically for students in the Claremont Native American Fellowship program. The course will support students in their effort to meet the California Standards for the Teaching Profession by exploring 1) various ethical concerns specific to the Native American community; 2) subject matter competence and multiple perspectives; 3) effective pedagogical practices; and 4) their students including their individual strengths, interests, and needs; and knowledge about their families and communities. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
368 3045 1 4   Collaboration in Special Education: An Ecological Model
TextbookTextbook
Patricia Gonzalez Mon 6:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Online Class meets from 6-9pm on Mondays. No class on Monday 2/20/23 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. In this course, candidates will learn how to effectively collaborate with multidisciplinary teams (to include general education colleagues, paraprofessionals, related service providers, households, community agencies, and administration) in the planning, assessment, drafting, and implementation of the IEP and all necessary supports and services for students on their caseloads. Candidates will learn about group dynamics, co-teaching models, and principles of ethics and apply that knowledge to the ways in which they create and sustain relationships with their classroom ecology.  Moreover, they will use the information learned in course EDUC 338 to level up their practice around meeting the social-emotional, behavioral and transition needs of students with disabilities by learning how to analyze and interpret formal assessment data (i.e. Functional Behavior Analyses (FBA) and Individual Transition Plans) when drafting student-centered IEPs. Additionally, candidates will learn about health care considerations when teaching communication (via Assistive Technology and/or Augmentative and Alternative Communication), choice making, self-advocacy, social skills, and mobility. Lastly, candidates will demonstrate knowledge of federal, state, and local policies related to specialized health care in the educational context as well as the unique experiences of households of students who are chronically ill or transitioning in and out of hospitalized care including students with Traumatic Brain injuries.  All in-class activities and course assignments will be differentiated to meet the unique needs of Mild/Moderate Support Needs (MMSN) and Extensive Needs (ESN) candidates.

EDUC
374 3047 1 1   California Teaching Performance Assessment (CalTPA) Cycle I Support
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
Online Class Online Online asynchronous modules available through April 26, 2023. Instructor feedback scheduled independently as needed through April 26, 2023. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This class includes asynchronous content. Preliminary teaching candidates will work on the California Teaching Performance Assessment Tasks Cycle 1 in preparation for submission of their portfolio to the state by December. Feedback and guidance will be offered aligned to the CalTPA Assessment Guide. Pre-requisite for Cycle 1 Course: Candidates must record a single lesson that demonstrates the required content for each of the 3 video clips. All required content for each video clip must be demonstrated within 5 minutes each. See Cycle 1 V04 assessment guide for more details. Note: For Fall 2022 there is NO pre-req regarding the recording of videos. (There is a pre-req regarding recording of videos for this class for its summer 2022 scheduling sent in last week. If you need clarification, please speak with your department)

EDUC
375 3046 1 1   California Teaching Performance Assessment (CalTPA) Cycle 2 Support
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 5:30PM -
7:20PM
Online Class Online Class meets from 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm on select Wednesdays: 1/25,2/1,2/15,3/8,3/22,3/29,4/12,4/26 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Preliminary teaching candidates will work on the California Teaching Performance Assessment Tasks Cycle 2 in preparation for submission of their portfolio to the state by April. Feedback and guidance will be offered aligned to the CalTPA Assessment Guide. Pre-requisite for Cycle 2: Candidates must record a minimum of 3 lessons and a maximum of 5 full lessons that demonstrate the content for the 4 required video clips from the Learning Segment. All required content for each video clip must be demonstrated within 5 minutes each. In addition, candidates must record a re-teach/extension activity to a group of students or the whole class. The re-teach/extension activity that is recorded must be based on data received from the formal assessment results and clearly aligned to the learning goals that are being re-taught or extended. The re-teach/extension activity must be captured within 5 minutes as well. See Cycle 2 V04 assessment guide for more details.

EDUC
400M 3067 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Supervision Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

EDUC
421 3269 1 2 M1 Working With and For Undocumented Students
TextbookTextbook
Gloria I Montiel Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This class includes asynchronous content. This 2-unit course is part of the Allies of Dreamers Program and is specifically designed to meet the needs of this Program’s students. (Students who aren’t in the Allies of Dreamers Program are welcome to take this course. It should be noted, however, that students who are taking the course as part of the Allies Program should have already taken EDUC 419 and 420 as there is a sequential order to the curriculum.) This class will prepare the students in the Allies Program to work effectively with the families of undocumented youth. By the end of this course the successful student will be able to understand the barriers facing undocumented students and mixed-status families; develop strategies to help undocumented K-16 students understand and navigate their immigration status; practice providing a safe space for undocumented students and mixed-status families; develop and implement a strategy for better supporting undocumented students and their families. Participants will learn how to do an asset-map for a specific community and learn how to establish rapport with an understandably leery population.

EDUC
422 3255 1 2 M2 Promoting Wellness in Undocumented Populations and The Allies Who Support Them
TextbookTextbook
Laureen Adams Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This class includes asynchronous content. This 2-unit course is part of the Allies of Dreamers Program and is specifically designed to meet the needs of this Program’s students. (Students who aren’t in the Allies of Dreamers Program are welcome to take this course. It should be noted, however, that students who are taking the course as part of the Allies Program should have already taken EDUC 419 and 420 as there is a sequential order to the curriculum.) This final course in the Allies Program relates to wellness. The first half of the course specifically addresses how to promote wellness in undocumented populations; the second half of the course addresses how advocates and allies supporting undocumented populations need to maintain their own personal and professional wellbeing. In the first half of the course students will (A) hear relevant stories from members of immigrant communities and review several recent studies that identify and describe some of the most significant and growing physical and mental health challenges facing undocumented population groups in the US; (B) examine a variety of holistic health interventions based on neuroscience research, public health, ethno-medicine, and the behavioral sciences that have been found effective in addressing some of these challenges; and (C) train in specific Holistic Health and Critical Mentorship techniques for working with undocumented youth and their families. The second half of the course focuses on five discreet and yet interconnected areas: (A) the work of teacher leaders and activists, (B) finding the right professional development, (C) finding and building relationships with like-minded colleagues, (D) self-care and (E) resilience. Objectives relate to identifying qualities of teacher leaders/activists; evaluating one’s own personal and professional needs as teacher leaders/activists; determining appropriate professional development for these needs; applying self-care and resiliency strategies to one’s work as an advocate; building and utilizing networks; and reflecting upon one’s own strengths and areas of growth as teacher leaders/activists.

EDUC
424 3252 1 4   Gender & Education
TextbookTextbook
Linda Perkins Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 31 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course will examine the historical, philosophical, cultural and sociological issues related to gender and education. The class will focus on issues of race, religion, class, ethnicity, immigrant status, and sexual orientation and their impact on gender and schooling. Special attention shall be given to the debates over the differing purposes of education for girls and boys, and the various curricula that have been established to accommodate these perceived differences. The course will explore the historical debate of single-sex versus co-education in education. Among the questions to be addressed are: do current school practices "short-change" girls? Are schools more "girl-friendly", resulting in lower levels of achievement for boys, particularly in elementary school? Why are boys from African American and Latino backgrounds overrepresented in special education classes, in school expulsions and other disciplinary actions? Is single-sex schooling better for girls and boys, or does coeducation prepare them for the "real" world? Are single-sex schools better for minority males? How do immigrant children, often raised in more "traditional" with strict gender expectations, respond to educational programs aimed at "gender equity"? What is the role in popular culture in shaping attitudes towards gender expectations for youth? Why are girls and women surpassing boys in college attendance and graduation? What are the social consequences of the dramatic progress of women and girls in education?

EDUC
426 3273 1 4   Critical & Asset-Based Theoretical Frameworks and Their Use in the Field of Education
TextbookTextbook
Torie Weiston Mon 5:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 33 Hybrid This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course will focus on asset-­-based frameworks to examine the experiences of underrepresented and marginalized communities in K-­-12 and Higher Education. The course will cover theories such as Social & Cultural Capital, Critical Race Theory, Intersectionality, Funds of Knowledge, Community Cultural Wealth and Social Cognitive Theory. Students will examine the intellectual history of these concepts, current exemplars of research that utilize these concepts in both higher education and K-­-12, and critical reflection on research traditions. The course will also focus on the study of social processes and interaction patterns in educational organizations; relationship of such organizations to aspects of society, social class, and power; social relations within school, college, and university; formal and informal groups, subcultures in educational systems; roles of teachers, students, and administrators.

EDUC
447 3267 1 4   Design & Lifecycle of a Survey Project
TextbookTextbook
Gwen E. Garrison Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This class includes asynchronous content. K-12 and higher education systems frequently design forms and questionnaires to capture information necessary to their program monitoring and performance. Using the survey life cycle approach this course will create the necessary plans that align with the initial purpose and future reuse of the data from design strength, collection and analysis lessons learned. Outcome of this course will be a detailed plan for a survey project demonstrating all lifecycle components and all necessary reporting and communications functions to ensure an effective project. This course is offered as a hybrid with both CGU and online meetings. This class is being designed to be hybrid with some sessions being at CGU and some sessions being held with virtual tools. It has not yet been determined what the ratio will be between traditional and online sessions. Given the online sessions, it is imperative that students have access to a working computer that has a microphone and camera and that the student has access to reliable internet service. Students can always utilize the CGU computer labs if needed. Instructor is planning to introduce students to Qualtrics and Smartsheet.

EDUC
449 3268 1 4   Clinical Practicum for Educational Evaluation and Data Analysis Students
TextbookTextbook
Gwen E. Garrison Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
No Room Needed Hybrid EEDA Students only This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. These dates will also be with the SAEJ Practicum students Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course prepares EEDA students to launch their career in education evaluation and evaluation. Each student will prepare their professional portfolio and complete a project in one of four core areas: research and evaluation planning, data governance, data storytelling, or a research project. This final project will allow students to apply their skills and demonstrate mastery in a program outcome.

EDUC
450 3271 1 4   Practicum in Student Affairs
TextbookTextbook
Jennifer L Alanis Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
No Room Needed Hybrid SAEJ Students only This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. These dates will also be with the EEDA Practicum students Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Practicum in Student Affair provides you with an opportunity to apply what you have learned in your coursework in the authentic context of a student affairs office or related students affairs position. Students in this class are expected to work on an authentic project within their office at a college or university. The practicum placement is paired with university-based sessions where the students make sense of their practicum experiences as a collective and discuss professional expectations and norms. Central to this approach is your progress toward becoming a practitioner-scholar, a professional who can apply research and scholarship in the field to the everyday demands of a position in student affairs. Students will develop competencies around theories and conceptual frameworks; communication; access & equity; policy & law; and professional socialization.

EDUC
451 3275 1 4   Community-Engaged Practicum for CEESC Students
TextbookTextbook
Torie Weiston  -
No Room Needed Supervision Class does not meet weekly; it is a practicum and dates are arranged with students. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. Today, there is significant concern that public education has reached a critical juncture. Perhaps more than any other social institution, public schools mirror a troubling array of social problems. Furthermore, educational spaces have been critiqued as complicit or not revolutionary enough in their response to these social problems. Yet also more than any other social institution, public education provides vital opportunities to express social justice, compassion, imagination, and integrity. Often missing from discussions about education is the importance of an equity eco-system that includes communities, non-profits, philanthropy, and movements. How these systems can work together and provide checks and balances for each other demand meaningful exploration. This course will provide students a study of the sociological, historical, political, legal, and philosophical bases of American education, philanthropy, and movement building. In addition, this course will also provide students the opportunity to examine the principles, problems, and practices influencing schools, communities, and public services. In this course, students will engage with research and scholarship on teaching, NGO systems, and activist movements as well as interact with actors in each of these fields. This is a structured course that is designed to assist students in examining what it means to be an actor in an equity eco-system. As a culmination of students’ experiences in the program, this course is meant to be an opportunity for reflection, critical interrogation, and application of the concepts and skills acquired. The capstone project or thesis, completed by the end of the course, validates students as master scholar-practitioners fully prepared to engage as critical actors in their field. Students will engage with research and scholarship on teaching, NGO systems, and activist movements as well as interact with actors in each of these fields. This is a structured course that is designed to assist students as they design and implement a capstone project. This project can be education, community, or public service focused and must include conceptual justification using relevant reference materials.

EDUC
460 3258 1 4   Foundations of Student Affairs in Higher Education
TextbookTextbook
Jennifer L Alanis, Marco A Valenzuela Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 33 Hybrid In-Person Dates: January 26 Feb. 16 Mar 2 Apr 13 May 11 This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This seminar provides an overview of student affairs administration in postsecondary education. Attention is given to the historical perspectives and foundational philosophies of student affairs and the functions and administrative relationships within the college setting particularly as they relate to theory, research and practice. Prerequisite: Education students only or instructor permission.

EDUC
475 3272 1 4   Qualitative Research Inquiry II
TextbookTextbook
Susan Bush-Mecenas Sat 9:00AM -
3:50PM
Harper 2 In-Person Introductory Information Class on 12/13/2022 from 04:00PM to 06:50PM Meets Saturdays from 09:00AM - 03:50PM 01/17/2023 - 05/13/2023 In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Course will include advances qualitative approaches, data collection, application of coding techniques and analysis. Pre req: Instructor approval and completed SES Introduction to Qualitative Methods course. Experience conducting and completing own research study.

EDUC
479 3256 1 4   Quantitative Research Methods II
TextbookTextbook
Guan Kung Saw Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The techniques presented in the prior course analyzed two variables at a time, bivariate analysis. In advanced quantitative research we usually contextualize our analysis and examine three or more variables at a time, multivariate analysis. In this course, we focus on the most widely used multivariate techniques in educational research. The single most widely used multivariate technique, multiple linear regression, is presented first, as is a related technique, logistic regression. Next, another related technique, multiple linear path analysis, is presented. Experience has shown that some students really gravitate towards this technique and go on to feature it in their dissertation. This is followed by factor analysis, another technique that frequently is employed in social science research. Students become thoroughly familiar with, and comfortable with, the statistical parameters or measures produced, the assumptions for each technique, how to plan an analysis to address your research questions, and, perhaps most important, how to interpret and present a multivariate analysis.

EDUC
485B 3259 1 2   Research Practicum, Part B
TextbookTextbook
Staff Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McNassor Room (Harper 53) Hybrid This course is limited to students who have completed ED458A. Off-campus (no CGU facility use) / Tuesday, 1/24, 4:00 - 6:50pm (in-person) Monday, 1/23, 4:00 - 6:50pm (in-person) Monday, 2/6, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Monday, 2/20, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Monday 3/6, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Monday, 3/20, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Monday, 4/3, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Monday, 4/17, 4:00 - 6:50pm (in-person) Monday, 5/1, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination This class works in conjunction with Research Practicum Part A, a prerequisite for this course. Together the two courses span two consecutive terms (typically meeting every other week during each term). Students are expected to enroll in both Part A (2-units) and Part B (2-units) in consecutive terms. The class is limited to nine students and is only offered Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (with a Satisfactory indicating that the student is getting a "B" or better in the course). The goal of the class is for the faculty and students to work as a research team that takes a collaborative research project through an entire arc/cycle, from conception through literature review through theoretical & methodological design through data collection through data analysis and ending with the reporting of findings. Students need not have preexisting familiarity with the subject matter. In the context of this class, students will work together under the guidance of the faculty member to identify the topic of their project, define the problem and its significance, author a literature review, design the study, get the project approved by IRB, collect and analyze the data, and articulate the findings and their implications. The group will also identify appropriate conferences and journals for potential manuscript submission. The goal of the class is to give students tangible experience with a full empirical research process prior to designing and implementing their own dissertation study. Students are expected to attend all class sessions as scheduled. This class can only be taken once. The work done as part of this class cannot be used as a qualifying exam but students can ask that the faculty member evaluate their skills in terms of specific doctoral competencies. Students are encouraged to contact the faculty member via email prior to registration opening if they have any questions. It is expected that this class may fill quickly. If this is the case, contact SES@cgu.edu and ask that you be put on a waiting list. (Make the subject of the email: "Please put me on the waiting list for the Research Practicum Class.")

EDUC
485B 3259 1 2   Research Practicum, Part B
TextbookTextbook
Staff Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McNassor Room (Harper 53) Hybrid This course is limited to students who have completed ED458A. Off-campus (no CGU facility use) / Tuesday, 1/24, 4:00 - 6:50pm (in-person) Monday, 1/23, 4:00 - 6:50pm (in-person) Monday, 2/6, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Monday, 2/20, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Monday 3/6, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Monday, 3/20, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Monday, 4/3, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Monday, 4/17, 4:00 - 6:50pm (in-person) Monday, 5/1, 4:00 - 6:50pm (zoom) Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination This class works in conjunction with Research Practicum Part A, a prerequisite for this course. Together the two courses span two consecutive terms (typically meeting every other week during each term). Students are expected to enroll in both Part A (2-units) and Part B (2-units) in consecutive terms. The class is limited to nine students and is only offered Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (with a Satisfactory indicating that the student is getting a "B" or better in the course). The goal of the class is for the faculty and students to work as a research team that takes a collaborative research project through an entire arc/cycle, from conception through literature review through theoretical & methodological design through data collection through data analysis and ending with the reporting of findings. Students need not have preexisting familiarity with the subject matter. In the context of this class, students will work together under the guidance of the faculty member to identify the topic of their project, define the problem and its significance, author a literature review, design the study, get the project approved by IRB, collect and analyze the data, and articulate the findings and their implications. The group will also identify appropriate conferences and journals for potential manuscript submission. The goal of the class is to give students tangible experience with a full empirical research process prior to designing and implementing their own dissertation study. Students are expected to attend all class sessions as scheduled. This class can only be taken once. The work done as part of this class cannot be used as a qualifying exam but students can ask that the faculty member evaluate their skills in terms of specific doctoral competencies. Students are encouraged to contact the faculty member via email prior to registration opening if they have any questions. It is expected that this class may fill quickly. If this is the case, contact SES@cgu.edu and ask that you be put on a waiting list. (Make the subject of the email: "Please put me on the waiting list for the Research Practicum Class.")

EDUC
499 3320 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Supervision Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EDUC
519 3254 1 4   Higher Education & Democracy
TextbookTextbook
Linda Perkins Tue 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The issue of access and higher education is one of continued discussion in American society. This course explores the notion of democracy and access to American higher education. Historically, American colleges were founded for Protestant white males to prepare them for the clergy, government and other positions of leadership. For nearly 110 years, (1636-1745) only three colleges existed in the nation (Harvard, College of William and Mary and Yale). Between the Revolutionary War and the Civil War (1776-1863), there was a proliferation of colleges founded throughout the states. The passing of the Morrill Act of 1862 by Congress to set aside land grants for each state to establish an affordable public college for the “sons and daughters of the common man” was important step in making higher education available to larger population of students. In 1890, a second Morrill Act was passed to ensure the access of African Americans to public higher education. Despite the growth of higher education, in 1946 President Harry Truman established a Presidential Commission to review the lack of access to higher education to large segments of the American society. This document, entitled, “Higher Education for American Democracy”, published in 1947 noted only 16% of college age students were enrolled in college. The Commission noted that having a small elite group of college graduates jeopardized democracy. It noted the barriers that rural, low-income, religious and racial minorities, women and non-veterans faced in seeking equitable access to higher education. The Commission’s Report resulted in the growth of community colleges, urban commuter colleges, significant changes in college curriculum, and federal aid to higher education (work-study, loans and grants) to make higher education more accessible and affordable. This class will look at American higher education in the 60 years since the Truman Commission’s Report. Some of the topics that will be discussed are: the Truman Presidency and Civil Rights, the politics of higher education, the role of the federal government in higher education, the meaning of “democracy”, the changing history of admissions policies in American higher education, the growth of a tiered system of higher education ranging from the “most selective” to open admissions colleges, the history of exclusion of various groups from higher education, the economics of higher education, and the debate regarding religious colleges obtaining federal funds.

EDUC
580B 3270 1 2   Capstone for Doctoral Research
TextbookTextbook
David Drew Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online This course will meet every other week. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course is primarily designed to prepare doctoral students for the process of writing their research outlines and dissertation proposals. In addition, it will allow students to gain the skills necessary to critically evaluate the design of published research in their respective areas of expertise. The target audience for the course is doctoral students in the School of Educational Studies (SES) who have completed their first qualifying exam, research tools (i.e., taken qualitative, mixed, and/or quantitative methods courses), and who are at or near the proposal stage of their doctoral programs. Students will be required to work with their peers and the instructor to craft a mock dissertation proposal which will include the following sections:  (1) introduction (i.e., purpose, statement, and research questions), (2) literature review map, (3) theoretical framework, and (4) methods (i.e., sample, data collection, data analysis, and limitations). Prerequisite: Departmental approval, pending confirmation of 62 units of completed coursework (including transfer units), two filed research tools, and one approved qualifying exam. Note: This course is required for all doctoral students in SES entering in Summer 2013 or later. Although the focus will be on proposal development, it does not take the place of the doctoral advisor and dissertation committee. Students must consult with their advisor regarding the expected format and content of their dissertation proposal.  Enrollment Instructions: Students who have no holds on their account can register to the waitlist for the course via the Student Portal (myCGU). The SES Office will review the readiness (including both fulfillment of requirements and length of time in the program) of each person on the waiting list and, upon dean/instructor approval, register eligible waitlisted students on a space available basis.

EDUC
580UL 3262 1 2   Capstone for Doctoral Research for Urban Leadership Students
TextbookTextbook
Staff Fri 4:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online Does not meet weekly, only on: January 20, March 3, March 31, April 28 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The Capstone is a required course for PhD students in CGU’s School of Educational Studies who are completing coursework and beginning their dissertation research. First and foremost, the course is designed to prepare doctoral students to write an initial mock draft of their dissertation proposals. The course is designed to support students as they accomplish four main objectives: 1) develop a critical understanding of literature in their areas of research interest; 2) think and plan carefully in designing their own research; 3) strengthen their skills in critical thinking, reading, and writing; and 4) learn and put into place the basic requirements of a dissertation proposal. The course is divided into three sections. Section 1 serves as an introduction to the process of writing a dissertation proposal, including finding, reviewing, and critiquing academic literature; writing clearly and persuasively; and identifying a theoretical framework and designing a study. Section 2 provides an overview of key milestones that students will complete as they continue working toward the PhD: qualifying exams, the dissertation proposal, and the dissertation. In section 3, students will share their work and provide feedback to their classmates. Although the focus will be on proposal development, it does not take the place of the doctoral advisor and dissertation committee. Students must consult with their advisor regarding the expected format and content of their dissertation proposal.

EDUC
580UL 3262 1 2   Capstone for Doctoral Research for Urban Leadership Students
TextbookTextbook
Staff Fri 4:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online Does not meet weekly, only on: January 20, March 3, March 31, April 28 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The Capstone is a required course for PhD students in CGU’s School of Educational Studies who are completing coursework and beginning their dissertation research. First and foremost, the course is designed to prepare doctoral students to write an initial mock draft of their dissertation proposals. The course is designed to support students as they accomplish four main objectives: 1) develop a critical understanding of literature in their areas of research interest; 2) think and plan carefully in designing their own research; 3) strengthen their skills in critical thinking, reading, and writing; and 4) learn and put into place the basic requirements of a dissertation proposal. The course is divided into three sections. Section 1 serves as an introduction to the process of writing a dissertation proposal, including finding, reviewing, and critiquing academic literature; writing clearly and persuasively; and identifying a theoretical framework and designing a study. Section 2 provides an overview of key milestones that students will complete as they continue working toward the PhD: qualifying exams, the dissertation proposal, and the dissertation. In section 3, students will share their work and provide feedback to their classmates. Although the focus will be on proposal development, it does not take the place of the doctoral advisor and dissertation committee. Students must consult with their advisor regarding the expected format and content of their dissertation proposal.

EDUC
631UL 3263 1 2   Writing for Publication in Education
TextbookTextbook
Thomas Luschei Sat 9:00AM -
3:50PM
McManus 31 Hybrid Meeting dates in Spring 2023: February 4, March 18, April 15 (all Saturdays), and April 28 (Friday) from 9:00AM - 3:50PM. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course is designed for Urban Leadership students to become familiar with the process of academic writing for publication.

EDUC
635UL 3260 1 4   Collecting and Analyzing Data for Qualitative and Quantitative Research In School Contexts
TextbookTextbook
Staff Sat 9:00AM -
3:50PM
Yuhaaviatam Center 108 Hybrid This course is limited to students who have completed ED458A. Students will meet the following dates: Saturday, 1/21, 9:00am - 4:00pm (in person) Friday, 2/3, 4:00 - 10:00pm (zoom) Saturday, 3/4, 9:00am - 4:00pm (in person) Friday, 3/17, 4:00 - 10:00pm (zoom) Saturday, 4/1, 9:00 - 4:00pm (in person) Friday, 4/14, 4:00 - 10:00pm (zoom) Saturday, 4/29, 9:00 - 4:00pm (in person) Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend cla This course focuses on the collection and analysis of data in school contexts and considers the design and implementation of research studies, contextualized by current educational issues and practical real-world constraints. Topics include the formulation of research questions and problem statements, operational definitions of constructs, conceptual framing, sampling methods, the Institutional Review Board process, quantitative and qualitative data collection, data analysis and reporting. Each session will focus on specific aspects of research design and methodology through the exploration of major questions in education, analysis of prior research, and practical application using real data.

EDUC
635UL 3260 1 4   Collecting and Analyzing Data for Qualitative and Quantitative Research In School Contexts
TextbookTextbook
Staff Sat 9:00AM -
3:50PM
Yuhaaviatam Center 108 Hybrid This course is limited to students who have completed ED458A. Students will meet the following dates: Saturday, 1/21, 9:00am - 4:00pm (in person) Friday, 2/3, 4:00 - 10:00pm (zoom) Saturday, 3/4, 9:00am - 4:00pm (in person) Friday, 3/17, 4:00 - 10:00pm (zoom) Saturday, 4/1, 9:00 - 4:00pm (in person) Friday, 4/14, 4:00 - 10:00pm (zoom) Saturday, 4/29, 9:00 - 4:00pm (in person) Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend cla This course focuses on the collection and analysis of data in school contexts and considers the design and implementation of research studies, contextualized by current educational issues and practical real-world constraints. Topics include the formulation of research questions and problem statements, operational definitions of constructs, conceptual framing, sampling methods, the Institutional Review Board process, quantitative and qualitative data collection, data analysis and reporting. Each session will focus on specific aspects of research design and methodology through the exploration of major questions in education, analysis of prior research, and practical application using real data.

EDUC
647 3257 1 4   Inequalities in Education
TextbookTextbook
Guan Kung Saw Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course draws primarily on the PK-12 education literature, supplemented with the higher education literature, to examine the causes, patterns, trends, and consequences of educational inequalities such as achievement gaps, school segregation, curriculum differentiation, and educational attainment disparities. It introduces major theories in studying inequalities in education and social stratification processes in education, including theories on social reproduction, status attainment model, effectively maintained inequality, and maximally maintained inequality. This course also discusses what individual, organizational, and policy level approaches can be employed to reduce educational disparities.

EDUC
700 3261 1 4   Teacher Quality
TextbookTextbook
Thomas Luschei Thu 6:00PM -
8:50PM
Harper 1 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The objective of this course is to understand and apply economic and interdisciplinary approaches to assess teacher quality and teacher behavior. Topics include identifying and recruiting effective teachers, evaluating teacher performance, the supply and demand for teachers, the distribution of teachers, and the role of incentives in influencing teachers’ decisions about where and how they teach. The course will also explore global perspectives on teacher quality and related policies. Notes: no prerequisites, but preference for SES students

ENGLISH
349 3326 1 2   Chaucer Workshop
TextbookTextbook
Lori Ferrell  -
TBA In-Person Meeting dates: 02/02, 02/23, 03/09, 03/30, 05/04, and 05/11. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. A workshop designed as a graduate-level introduction to/encounter with Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Participants will meet in six two-hour sessions as well as complete independent work for a letter grade. This course fulfills the early modern requirement for the department of English and is encouraged for students formally enrolled in the Early Modern Concentration.

ENGLISH
370B 3276 1 4   Great Books? Part II
TextbookTextbook
Eric Bulson Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
RRC North Outdoor Classroom In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. It is not a term you hear much nowadays. The so-called "Great-Books course" has been shrouded in controversy since it first arrived in the modern university more than a century ago with compelling arguments on both sides about whether or not the whole idea should even exist. And yet, these courses and the literary works therein persist (even as the number of English majors declines precipitously), and they continue to get mobilized to justify or attack the concept of a general humanities education. "Great" Books is designed as a two-part course—part II, from Augustine to Woolf, in Spring 2023 includes works by Augustine, Boccaccio Dante, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Montaigne, Dostoevsky, Woolf, and W.G. Sebald. At various points throughout the semester, we will also engage with a variety of critical debates about the history and uncertain future of the Great-Books course. Preference given to students who already took Part I.

ENGLISH
380 3333 1 4   Contemporary Historical Fiction
TextbookTextbook
Mark Eaton Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 208 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This seminar explores contemporary historical fiction and the literary field. We will start by briefly considering the origins of historical fiction as an immensely popular form of literature in the 19th century and its continuing popularity today, such as the work of Philippa Gregory. Then we will consider how Hilary Mantel, Maggie O’Farrell and others have elevated historical fiction to the prestige of literary fiction. We will read examples of biographical fiction and counterfactual fiction by Colm Tóibín and Colson Whitehead. Finally, we will consider how contemporary historical fiction by Joshua Cohen, Maaza Mengiste, and Namwali Serpell immerses readers in the past in unexpected ways. Throughout the course, we will address such questions as: How do authors strike a balance between historical accuracy and imaginative license? What kinds of archival sources, fieldwork, or other forms of research do writers use—and how exactly? We will see how historical fiction writers can bring obscure historical events to light and/or offer fresh perspectives on well-known historical events and figures.

ENGLISH
387 3332 1 4   Am Lit/Film: Lyric Voice&Vision
TextbookTextbook
James E Morrison Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 31 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course investigates American poetry, prose and film from WWII to the present. Though the course surveys several major trends of the period, we will concentrate in particular on the "lyric impulse" in American culture, dealing with texts across genres concerned with ideas of epiphany, meditation, contemplation, transcendence and the notion of the "poetic." We will pay special attention to work that confronts the question of how to maintain this lyric impulse amid social and cultural developments often inimical to it, with a primary focus on short forms. We will begin with T. W. Adorno’s essay on "Lyric Poetry and Society," and consider additional critical/theoretical texts along the way. Other readings will include a few lyric poems as well as some short stories and short novels, including Elizabeth Bishop's "In the Village" and selected poems; Elizabeth Smart's "By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept"; Frank O'Hara's "Lunch Poems"; Grace Paley's "Enormous Changes at the Last Minute"; William Maxwell's "So Long See You Tomorrow"; Marilynne Robinson's "Gilead," Claudia Rankine's "Citizen: An American Lyric"; Jamaica Kincaid’s "See Now Then." Films: Several short films, including "Rose Hobart" by Joseph Cornell; "Meshes of the Afternoon" by Maya Deren; "Pull My Daisy" by Robert Frank and Alfred Leslie. Feature films including "Night of the Hunter" (Charles Laughton, 1955); "Wanda" (Barbara Loden, 1970); "Days of Heaven" (Terrence Malick, 1978); "The Straight Story" (David Lynch, 1999), "Margaret" (Kenneth Lonergan, 2010).

ENGLISH
400M 3321 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Supervision Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

ENGLISH
443A 3277 1 4   About Barthes
TextbookTextbook
Eric Bulson Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Harper 1 In-Person Preference will be given to students who completed ENG 370B. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. An intensive upper-level seminar devoted entirely to the works of the essayist, critic, philosopher, theorist Roland Barthes. We will follow his literary-critical career as it develops over the course of 30 incredibly productive years. Barthes played a formative role in the development of literary and cultural criticism and theory in the second half of the 20th century, producing an extensive set of critical experiments intended to help us come to terms with the possibilities and limits of literature and the role of the critic in society. In addition to reading his major works—Writing Degree Zero, Mythologies, S/Z, A Lover’s Discourse, The Pleasure of the Text—we will also consider the notes, lectures, slides that he compiled for his seminars at the College de France. Familiarity with the history of literary theory preferred but not required. This course fulfills the THEORY requirement.

ENGLISH
451 3350 1 4   Authorship
TextbookTextbook
Emma C Eisenberg Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online Instructor: Emma Eisenberg Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. What is an author: a writer of fiction or the fiction of a writer? Authorship implies ownership and authority over one’s own ideas and their form, as well as an expectation that those expressions are original and even characteristic. But in practice, literature is filled with co-authorship, whether that collaboration is official or unofficial. Novels revel in metafictional themes through frame narrators and fictitious editors, genres develop across individual works, stories get adapted across media, and readers continuously infuse old language with new meanings. This course will explore these complex dynamics through three frameworks: print culture, media studies, and game studies. Theory and criticism from these fields will frame literary objects drawn primarily from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a period when the individual author emerged as an important figure in theory if not always in practice (selected writers may include Emily Brontë, Alfred Tennyson, Oscar Wilde, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Bram Stoker). However, we will also engage with some contemporary media, such as film adaptations and gaming streams, in order to consider how collaboration continues to structure the ways we produce and consume media.

ENGLISH
456 3278 1 4   Hemispheric Americas Studies
TextbookTextbook
David Luis-Brown Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Blaisdell 7 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The “transnational turn” in American Studies over the last two decades has sought to explain how U.S. American culture and history is bound up with the histories of the Black Atlantic, the Pacific, and the Americas. Building on waves of innovative, multilingual scholarship in hemispheric studies—one of the most influential fields in the transnational turn—this course examines the literature and culture of the Americas from the nineteenth century to the present. Although topics and texts in this interdisciplinary course may differ from year to year, this year the focus will be on representations of nation, race, empire and violence in Central America, Cuba, Haiti, Mexico and the United States. The course will examine a wide variety of cultural texts, ranging from novels, essays, poetry and political tracts to murals and films, along with critical essays, theory and historiography. This course meets the requirements for the Certificate in Africana Studies as well as the concentrations in American Studies and Hemispheric and Transnational Studies.

ENGLISH
499 3322 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Supervision Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EVAL
325 3244 1 4   Qualitative Research Methods for Evaluation & Applied Research
TextbookTextbook
Maria Blanca Jimenez Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is designed to introduce students to qualitative research methods. Although students will be introduced to the theoretical paradigms that underlie the methods we cover, the primary emphasis will be on learning how to apply qualitative methods to conduct high-quality applied research and evaluation work. We will explore qualitative data collection techniques, including observations, interviews, document analyses, and focus groups, and qualitative analytic approaches, including content analysis, grounded theory, and Consensual Qualitative Research. We’ll discuss the conditions under which each data collection and data analysis technique is appropriate, and we’ll consider the relative strengths and limitations associated with each. In addition to learning about qualitative research by reading high-quality qualitative work products, students will also design and carry out a qualitative investigation over the course of the semester.

EVAL
385 3246 1 4   Evaluation & Applied Research Procedures
TextbookTextbook
Lisa M Dillman Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is designed to help students translate what they have learned in previous courses into practice. The course will use a group based project where students connect with clients virtually to develop an evaluation proposal. Students will also engage in group/team activities, and interactive discussions to teach students how to respond to various evaluation situations ranging from the technical, methodological, logistical, and political that commonly occur in practice. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with different approaches to evaluation practice, gain a better understanding of the issues that frequently emerge in evaluation contexts, and have a set of tools and skills to help deal with these practice issues.

EVAL
400M 3247 1 0   Continuous Registration (MS Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Independent Studies Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

FINANENG
328 3098 1 2 M2 Blockchain Technologies: A Hands-On Approach
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Treanor Room (Harper 55) Hybrid March 25 in-person (9am-12pm and 1-4pm) April 8 - online (9am-12pm and 1-4pm) April 22 - online (9am-12pm and 1-4pm) May 6 - in person (9am-12pm and 1-4pm) Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course introduces students to blockchain and major applications of it. Students will gain hands-on exposure to the creation and use of a simple blockchain. They will also learn the basics of programming and auditing smart contracts.

HISTORY
304 3249 1 4   Introduction to Oral History Methodology
TextbookTextbook
Joanna Poblete Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 31 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This research seminar is designed to explore the field of oral history through both readings and practical experience. It will offer grounding in oral history methodology, including the basics of interview design, effective interviewing techniques, and fundamental legal and ethical issues. It will also provide an introduction to some of the salient theoretical issues related to oral history, including how oral history functions as historical evidence, issues of social memory, and the narrative construction of life stories. The Spring 2023 class will focus on women of color in Southern California. If allowed by the person interviewed, recordings and transcripts will be archived at Special Collections in the Honnold/Mudd Library. Students also have the option to archive their analysis papers from the course. This course fulfills the Oral History research tool requirement, counts towards the SAH American Studies Concentration, History Department U.S. track and American Studies track, and can serve as a Gender and Women’s Studies elective. This course counts fulfills the History research tool requirement and counts towards the Women and Gender Studies certificate.

HISTORY
331 3250 1 4   The Environment and Indigeneity
TextbookTextbook
Joanna Poblete Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 33 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course explores the intersections of environmental and indigenous histories. Environmental history, policies, and issues that impact native lives in North America will be studied from multiple disciplines and perspectives. By the end of this course, students will understand a variety of approaches to resource management, learn about general issues that stem from government policies on native lands, examine specific historical cases and interactions, and create a synthesis of historiographical ideas. This course counts towards the History Department U.S. and American Studies track, as well as the SAH American Studies concentration.

HISTORY
400M 3323 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff  -
No Room Needed Supervision Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

HISTORY
400M 3323 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff  -
No Room Needed Supervision Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

HISTORY
420 3251 1 4   The Sixties: American Politics, Religion and Culture 1954-1974
TextbookTextbook
Matthew B. Bowman Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Harper 1 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course examines what historians have called the "long 1960s" - the period from the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision to the resignation of Richard Nixon in 1974. It will examine the various social and cultural movements of the period: the New Left and the counterculture; the Black freedom and California farmworkers movements and the rise of second wave feminism; and the emergence of the New Age and alternative spiritualities. The class will be particularly focused on the culture of the 1960s, and will introduce students to major works of historiography. This course counts towards the History Department U.S. and American Studies track, as well as the SAH American Studies concentration.

HISTORY
425 3264 1 4   Topics in Global History: Latin American and Caribbean Migrations
TextbookTextbook
Romeo Guzman Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
IAC Library In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. “Once,” wrote Oscar Handlin, “I thought to write a history of the immigrants in America. Then I discovered that the immigrants were American history.” The Harvard professor and Pulitzer Prize winner was referring to his 1951 The Uprooted, perhaps the most well-known and read history book on U.S. immigration. In films, movies, songs, and scholarship, the United States is described as a nation of immigrants. From this vantage point, the rest of the Americas are perceived as nations that send migrants. Inspired by Joaquín Torres Garcia’s 1943 pen and ink drawing “América Invertida” and drawing from transnational and global perspectives, this course centers the Americas. Collectively, the course readings on Mexico, Central and South America force us to consider movement to and through the Americas. This includes imagining the United States as a country that deports migrants and has consistently pushed out its own citizens into countries like Mexico. More importantly, the readings force us to consider countries in the Americas as places that both send and receive migrants, exiles, and refugees. This is an ideal course for students interested in transnational and global approaches to immigration and Latin America. This course counts towards the History Department American Studies track, SAH American Studies concentration, and SAH Hemispheric and Transnational Studies concentration.

HISTORY
430 3253 1 4   Studies in Intellectual History: Capital, Surveillance, Inequality
TextbookTextbook
Ray Wakefield Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Harper 1 In-Person Instructor: Andre Wakefield In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course tracks the interwoven histories of surveillance capitalism and structural inequality. We will examine carefully the more recent iterations of these theories (Shoshona Zuboff, Thomas Piketty) while tracing their provenance from earlier historical and theoretical frames (Marx, Foucault, Schumpeter). Some familiarity with economic history, the history of economic thought, and industrial revolution historiography useful, but not required. This course counts towards the History Department European track.

HISTORY
435 3265 1 4   Global British Empire
TextbookTextbook
Jeffrey Auerbach Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
IAC Library In-Person Instructor: Jeffery Auerbach In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. At its height, the British Empire was the largest empire in the history of the world with colonies on every continent. This reading and discussion seminar will explore the contours and consequences of British imperialism from the mid-eighteenth century to the present day. It highlights recent scholarship and the ways historians have reframed traditional debates about imperial expansion, methods of colonial rule, the relationships between colonizer and colonized, the significance of race and gender in the empire, challenges to imperial control, and the continuing legacies of British imperialism. Topics include the East India Company and its role in the violent conquest and looting of India and the smuggling of opium into China; the global diaspora and restructuring of the empire in the wake of the American Revolution; the abolition of slavery and debates over reparations, both in the nineteenth century and today; the impact of the empire on British politics and culture, including museums, exhibitions, and world’s fairs; resistance to colonial rule and the use of violence and incarceration to suppress it; and the lingering aftereffects of the empire in Britain and around the world, including the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II, the decriminalization of homosexuality in India, and the toppling of statues. This course counts towards the History Department European track and SAH Hemispheric and Transnational Studies concentration.

HISTORY
499 3324 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Supervision Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

HRM
303 3222 1 2 M1 Organizational Development and Change
TextbookTextbook
Scott Schroeder Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Harper 65 In-Person This course is a weekend Intensive course to meet in-person on the following dates and times: Friday, January 20 (7 - 9:50pm) Saturday, January 21 (9am - 4:50pm) Friday, February 3 (7 - 9:50pm) Saturday, February 4 (9am - 4:50pm) In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. In this course, you will be introduced to Organizational Development, its brief history and the theoretical models of change upon which the OD process is based. After this introduction, we will then explore the initial stages involved in OD – pre-launch, entry and start-up; diagnosis, assessment, and feedback; and action planning. We will also discuss the specific competencies needed by HR and OD professionals, and the values and ethics that should guide its practice. This course is specifically designed to provide you with the basic theoretical and competency base in OD as it applies to HR so that you are able to assist with and facilitate positive, planned change efforts within the organizations in which you work.

HRM
320 3227 1 2 M2 Planned Change Management
TextbookTextbook
Cynthia M Gilliland Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McNassor Room (Harper 53) In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Planned Change Management examines the process of doing things differently in organizations to take advantage of opportunities, solve problems or pursue continuous improvement. Focus is given to models for planned change at the individual, group, and systems levels. The roles of leaders, HR professionals and consultants in facilitating change are addressed.

HRM
321 3235 1 2 M2 Cultivating Diverse, Inclusive, and Equitable Organizations
TextbookTextbook
Sheilesha R Willis Wed 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The purpose of the course is to build students’ understanding of the ways in which diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) drive higher performance in organizations through higher talent attraction, deeper connection to team members and customers, and greater innovation. The course will focus on ways to assess DEI in organizations and integrate it across an organization’s workforce strategy and culture. Through this course, students will learn how to identify bias and develop an effective DEI strategy that builds more diverse and inclusive teams, promotes allyship, and produces equitable outcomes.

HRM
323 3228 1 2 M2 Legal Issues in HR
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 208 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Legal Issues considers basic statutory employment law and case law developments and their impact on current issues which bear directly on HR administration. The class will review issues of discrimination, wrongful termination, the law of leaves, wage-hour matters, employee privacy and the National Labor Relations Act.

HRM
326 3229 1 2 M2 Crisis Management
TextbookTextbook
Scott Schroeder Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Harper 65 In-Person This course has two weekend intensives. Students will meet on the following dates: Friday, April 7 (7pm - 9:50pm) Saturday, April 8 (9am - 4:50pm) Friday, April 14 (7pm - 9:50pm) Saturday, April 15 (9am - 4:50pm) In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Crisis Management focuses on skills and protocols for preventing and responding to disruptive negative events in organizations. Topics include crisis audits, risk management, crisis preparation, crisis containment, media engagement, and crisis recovery. Particular attention is given to the role of HR in managing individual and organizational crises.

HRM
327 3223 1 2 M1 Ethical Issues in HR
TextbookTextbook
Ronald Smedley Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via Canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Ethical Issues in Human Resources explores ethical issues that HR professionals confront with the growth of organizational competitiveness, diversity, and technology. As technological advances allow access to more information, HR professionals must decide what information can be sought for legitimate business purposes. These and other topics are discussed to help develop effective policies.

HRM
329 3230 1 2 M2 Human Resources Strategic Planning
TextbookTextbook
Ronald Smedley Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Harper 2 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Human Resources Strategic Planning is a continuation of HRD 328. This course focuses on developing and implementing an HR strategic plan based on the requirements of the larger organizational strategic needs. Topics covered in HRD 328 are treated on the micro level.

HRM
348 3239 1 2   Consulting
TextbookTextbook
Cynthia M Gilliland Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 33 In-Person Class meets in-person and bi-weekly: Tuesdays - January 24, February 7, February 21, March 7, March 21, April 4, April 18, May 2. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class focuses on Human Resource Management Consulting. Students learn and practice the steps in scoping, developing, and delivering a successful, portfolio-worthy consulting project to either an internal OR external real-world client organization. Special focus is given to students developing an understanding of themselves as consultants and change agents and to using client-centered, lean innovation, and positively-based tools and techniques to identify and create organizational development opportunities with high buy-in and impact.

HRM
357 3224 1 2 M1 Workforce Planning, Talent Management
TextbookTextbook
Sheilesha R Willis Wed 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via Canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The focus of this course is to gain an overview of the workforce with an emphasis on managing a company’s best asset, its employees. Students will understand HR’s role in the organization. Particular focus will be on planning and forecasting workforce needs, voluntary and involuntary retention, and labor supply and demand. Additional topics for discussion will also cover succession planning for future organizational initiatives, how to identify employee potential, and determine how equipped an individual must be to take on a greater role. This course is aimed at a leader’s role in effectively retaining talent and addressing organizational needs that will ultimately contribute to the overall success of both the employer and employee.

HRM
358 3234 1 2 M2 Staffing: Recruitment and Selection
TextbookTextbook
Jennifer A Jaffe Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Harper 61 In-Person This course is a weekend intensive. Students will meet on: Friday, March 31 (7pm - 9:50pm) Saturday, April 1 (9am - 4:50pm) Friday, April 21 (7pm - 9:50pm) Saturday, April 22 (9am - 4:50pm) In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course is a graduate-level treatment of recruiting and selecting the right people in the right jobs at the right time. Processes and practices required to ensure effective selection and utilization of talent to enhance organizational competitiveness, while also increasing employee capability to contribute to both organizational and professional objectives will be covered. We will also discuss issues such as external and internal forces that affect recruitment, selection and the planning process. Particular attention will be paid to identifying and placing talent, preparing the organization to leverage the benefits of an effective selection and succession management process and to linking these approaches to organizational objectives.

HRM
360P 3226 1 2 M1 Positive Careers and Coaching
TextbookTextbook
Paola Alvarez Fri 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via Canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course will address classic and contemporary research on career development, career assessments, and coaching. Topics include the psychology of career decisions, employment relationships, career transitions, mindsets, and models of career coaching. The course will be particularly useful for students interested in career development, employment relationships, and coaching. The course will provide students with theories and tools for conducting careers research, using career assessments, and for coaching and mentoring.

HRM
400M 3240 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Independent Studies Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

HUM
301 3279 1 2   Early Modern Studies Colloquium
TextbookTextbook
Lori Ferrell 4:00PM -
6:00PM
To Be Determined In-Person Course will meet 6 times though semester: 01/26, 02/09, 03/02, 03/23, 04/13, and 04/27. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course is open to students enrolled in the Early Modern Studies concentration. This course may be repeated for credit.

INST
400M 3359 1 0   Continuous Registration (Master's Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon  -
No Room Needed Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

INST
401 3339 1 4   World Politics
TextbookTextbook
Jacek Kugler Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 208 Hybrid Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This core seminar is designed to provide a broad survey of competing perspectives on international relations. It will evaluate and contrast major approaches to international politics in decision making, confrontation, deterrence, and political economy. The advantages and disadvantages of various perspectives are addressed. Problems associated with studying behavior from multiple levels of analysis (e.g., individual, group, and nation-state, systemic) are stressed.

INST
499 3360 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

ISP
201 3086 1 0   Academic Writing & Research I
TextbookTextbook
Marcus S Weakley  -
Online Class Online This course is for students enrolled in the International Scholars Program only. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is primarily for students in the International Scholars Program. It will help students learn to critically read academic texts, take notes effectively, and evaluate information for writing purposes while writing a range of texts. This course will also explore study skills and strategies that promote effective and independent learning. Finally, students will learn to describe the basic tenets of effective research, distinguish between the major types of research, and demonstrate an understanding of a range of research skills through writing assignments.

ISP
205 3087 1 0   Academic Listening & Speaking I
TextbookTextbook
Marcus S Weakley  -
Online Class Online This course is for students enrolled in the International Scholars Program only. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. his course is primarily for students in the International Scholars Program. It will help students develop and use English to communicate effectively in academic settings. Students will learn strategies for using the specialized vocabularies of their fields, how to listen and take notes effectively, and other skills in development of their aural/oral literacy. It will also include pronunciation practice Further, this course will teach students how to prepare and deliver oral presentations and engage in class and other academic listening and speaking contexts effectively.

ISP
251 3088 1 0   Academic Writing & Research II
TextbookTextbook
Marcus S Weakley  -
Online Class Online This course is for students enrolled in the International Scholars Program only. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is primarily for students in the International Scholars Program. It will help students acquire a level of English language proficiency sufficient to participate effectively in graduate classes and utilize those skills for higher-level conceptual learning. Students will learn to recognize and assess authority and evidence in academic and apply critical and analytical reasoning skills to assess academic texts. It will also prepare students to write their own research projects by learning how to identify major issues in research design and interpret data through a paradigm. Students will write a range of texts, appropriate to purpose, audience, and tone.

ISP
255 3089 1 0   Academic Listening & Speaking II
TextbookTextbook
Marcus S Weakley  -
Online Class Online This course is for students enrolled in the International Scholars Program only. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is primarily for students in the International Scholars Program. It will help students acquire a level of English language proficiency sufficient to participate effectively in graduate classes and utilize those skills for higher-level conceptual learning. Students will learn strategies for using the specialized vocabularies of their fields and other skills in development of their aural/oral literacy while attending to topics like the American graduate education culture and work environment, information literacy, the rationale and practice of group work, and the use of critical and analytical thinking skills.

IST
302 3004 1 4   Databases
TextbookTextbook
Nagla S Alnosayan Mon 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Session Online This class includes asynchronous content. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is intended for students to gain a deep understanding of the important concepts and techniques of physical relational database design and a fundamental understanding of the architecture of modern database management systems.

IST
303 3005 1 4   Software Development
TextbookTextbook
Terry Ryan Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 119 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is an introduction to software development using agile methods. Students use a combination of Python 3 and related tools to develop software. The class is practically oriented, with hands-on exercises occupying substantial chunks of class time.

IST
304 3006 1 4   Communications & Networking
TextbookTextbook
Nagla S Alnosayan Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This class includes asynchronous content. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This is a graduate level course covering computer networks and how the Internet operates. It provides a comprehensive discourse on networked applications, data communication and internet protocols; as well as network technologies such as LANs and WANs, and low-level details such as data transmission and wiring. The course also highlights exciting new developments in networking such as Cloud Computing, Edge Computing, Internet of Things (IoT) and Software Defined Networking (SDN).

IST
305 3007 1 4   Management of IT in Complex Times
TextbookTextbook
Sarah Osailan Sat 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Online Instructor: Sarah Osailan This class includes asynchronous content. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The course provides students with a deep understanding of what is involved in building and leveraging an effective Information Technology (IT) organization within the enterprise. Students will learn and practice the core IT Management practices and competencies, by which leading companies develop and organize their critical IT functions, in order to deliver improved business results. The course explores the key ingredients for IT managers as they engage their teams in navigating an increasingly complex and uncertain business environment.

IST
315 3008 1 4   Modern ERP & CRM Systems
TextbookTextbook
Itamar Shabtai Wed 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Online This class includes asynchronous content. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. TThis course will focus on modern digital supply chain management solutions. The learning method in this course is very practical and is based on PBL – Problem Based Learning. Using the PBL method, students will work in groups and choose a real-world problem/challenge/scenario. The course will use various methods and tools to solve these real-world practical challenges. Students will “role-play” as “consultants” and will design a solution that will efficiently plan and manage the activities within the supply chain. Students will experience the practical process of adopting and managing digital supply chain management solutions to solve organizational and business problems and will gain hands-on experience by using real world leading platforms - The SAP-ERP or Salesforce.com-CRM solutions that incorporates the key business functions of an organization within the supply chain and provide on premise and cloud solutions.

IST
328 3188 1 2 M2 Blockchain Technologies: A Hands-On Approach
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
3:50PM
Harper 61 Hybrid Instructor: Esperanza Huerta Class will meet biweekly for the following sessions: 9-12 & 1-4 on the following dates: March 25 in-person April 8 - online April 22 - online May 6 - in person Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course introduces students to blockchain and major applications of it. Students will gain hands-on exposure to the creation and use of a simple blockchain. They will also learn the basics of programming and auditing smart contracts. Basic programming knowledge is recommended to take the course.

IST
330 3195 1 1 - 4   Supervised Professional Practice in IS&T
TextbookTextbook
Brian Hilton  -
No Room Needed Supervision Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The goal of the supervised professional practice course is to enrich students' educational training in information systems and technology fields by providing an opportunity to apply theory and skills acquired from their classes to a professional setting. Students contribute to an organization or company’s resources and to specific projects while developing personal confidence and leadership as an IS&T professional.

IST
340 3009 1 4   Seminar in Knowledge Discovery & Data Mining
TextbookTextbook
Yan Li Mon 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online This class includes asynchronous content. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The Data Mining process goal of discovering of nontrivial, interesting and actionable previously unknown knowledge from data in databases. In this course we will introduce students to important concepts, models and techniques of data mining for modern organizations.

IST
341 3010 1 4   CS Insights via Python Programming
TextbookTextbook
Zachary Dodds Sat 12:30PM -
4:00PM
McManus 35 Hybrid-Flexible Hybrid-Flexible Instructional Mode Description: All synchronous instructional time occurs in-person and online simultaneously. Students can choose to attend synchronous sessions in-person or online. Course may include both synchronous and asynchronous instructional content. Computational thinking skills are fundamental to Information Science today. IS professionals build software primarily for insight into the systems they oversee. In this course students will engage with the full breadth of CS fundamentals providing those insights. Those fundamentals include computational thinking, software design strategies, the technologies underlying modern computation (circuits and assembly language), and both theoretical models and limits of computing. Programming with Python is emphasized throughout, including functional, imperative, and object-oriented paradigms and culminating in a larger-scale final project.

IST
355 3197 1 4   Cybersecurity Essentials Series with Optional Certifications
TextbookTextbook
Chinazunwa C. Uwaoma Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 22 Hybrid In person classes are: 4/05/2022 4/12/2023 4/19/2023 5/03/2023 Hybrid-Flexible Instructional Mode Description: All synchronous instructional time occurs in-person and online simultaneously. Students can choose to attend synchronous sessions in-person or online. Course may include both synchronous and asynchronous instructional content. While the cyberspace is being threatened each passing day, the gap in cybersecurity workforce keeps increasing. To address the shortage of cybersecurity professionals, there is the need to create a strong pipeline of future cybersecurity leaders. This entails developing programs to prepare and train cybersecurity professionals with standardized roles in the cybersecurity workforce. The Cybersecurity Essentials Series introduces students to various career paths in cybersecurity, specifically in the areas of Network Defense, Ethical Hacking, and Digital Forensics. The purpose is to provide students with the baseline knowledge, as well as the essential cybersecurity skills and abilities to advance and expand their cybersecurity career paths in the areas of their choice. Students will have access to learning resources including eBooks, video lectures/demos, extensive hands-on labs, and practice exams for certifications.

IST
370 3013 1 4   Introduction to GIS Analytics and Solution Development
TextbookTextbook
Brian Hilton Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 126 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course provides an overview of the theoretical foundations and the applied use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students demonstrate their understanding of the principles and fundamental concepts of GIS in a culminating project. Various course activities will expose students to the most current geospatial technologies and emerging issues and trends in the field.

IST
373 3014 1 4   GIS Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Caceres Fri 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 126 Hybrid-Flexible Instructor: Claudia Caceres Hybrid-Flexible Instructional Mode Description: All synchronous instructional time occurs in-person and online simultaneously. Students can choose to attend synchronous sessions in-person or online. Course may include both synchronous and asynchronous instructional content. This course provides students with the opportunity to design, implement, and evaluate a GIS-based solution, or apply GIS analytic techniques, to a research-based or organization defined problem. Students will be involved in various aspects of project planning, development, management, and analysis. This course is designed to transition the student from a classroom participant to a professional GIS practitioner.

IST
380 3015 1 4   Introduction to Health Informatics
TextbookTextbook
Samir Chatterjee Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Treanor Room (Harper 55) Hybrid In person classes are:1/17, 2/7, 2/28, 3/28, and 4/18. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Health Informatics, a novel academic discipline bridging Health and Information Technology, may be defined as the science that deals with the structure, acquisition and use of medical/health information. With the global boom in healthcare and quantum advancements in IT, healthcare informatics is already becoming an exciting career choice whose demand is projected to far exceed supply. This introductory level graduate course is geared to meet the educational needs of the health care professional seeking additional training in information management and technology & the non-health care professional seeking training in health information and technology.

IST
400M 3017 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Directed Research Instructional Mode Description: No or very minimal meetings. Used for group research projects with instructor guidance, or for committee guidance for dissertation. Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

IST
499 3019 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Directed Research Instructional Mode Description: No or very minimal meetings. Used for group research projects with instructor guidance, or for committee guidance for dissertation. Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree. During the semester students will generally work on: * Research methodology study and deployment * Experiment Design * Questionnaires Design * Experiment system development * Data collection and analysis

IST
503 3020 1 4   Qualitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Wallace Chipidza Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Stauffer 110 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course covers different ways of examining "what", "how", and "why" questions regarding information systems and technology. It addresses the scientific status of analytic and interpretive methods relative to the natural science model. It also covers methods such as grounded theory, ethnography, action research, and narrative analysis; a variety of intensive methods for collecting and tools for analyzing data; writing strategies; and ethical issues.

IST
504 3021 1 4   Quantitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Terry Ryan Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Stauffer 110 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course is a required doctoral seminar concerning concepts and practices of quantitative research in IS&T. It emphasizes the quantitative research most often published in IS&T journals. It excludes some topics covered elsewhere in the program, such as data mining, data visualization, machine learning, predictive analytics, and text analytics.

IST
506 3220 1 4   Application of Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
June Hilton Tue 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course focuses on the application of quantitative and qualitative research methods in order to conduct meaningful inquiry and research. The course will include the key components of designing a research proposal: developing / refining a research question, selecting the appropriate methodology (quantitative, qualitative, mixed), methods of data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and the presentation of results. The purpose of this course is for each student to improve their ability to use research to solve problems. Students will demonstrate their understanding of quantitative and qualitative methods through the completion of various class assignments, and a culminating course activity, utilizing various analytic tools (e.g., Qualtrics, SPSS, R, Python, etc.).

IST
507 3022 1 4   Dissertation Research - From Ideation to Draft Proposal
TextbookTextbook
Itamar Shabtai Mon 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Online This class includes asynchronous content. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is designed for PhD students to work with their advisors to create an outline for their dissertation. Students will be required to meet with their advisor on a bi-weekly basis to discuss current and future readings to prepare the student to complete their dissertation proposal.

LEAD
305B 3134 1 2   Leadership Practicum B
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 26 Hybrid Must be leadership student to enroll. Intensive meeting dates are on 1/20,2/17,3/10,4/7, and 5/5 Online meeting dates are 1/31 and 4/11- times will be sent via Canvas. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. "Management can be taught, but leadership must be learned.” This quotation from Warren Bennis reflects the current state of the play in leadership development. Although teaching leadership concepts and theories in the classroom is important, researchers and practitioners agree that this is not how people actually develop leadership skills or become leaders. Rather, developing as a leader is a lifelong process of integrating experiences, experimenting with behaviors, encountering unfamiliar contexts and challenging situations, emulating role models, building self-awareness, and finding oneself and one’s purpose. There are no clear prescriptions in this process, and each person’s journey is his/her own. However, there are skills, habits, insights, and attitudes you can bring to this lifelong process that can enhance (or also hinder) your ability to develop leadership. The aim of this course is to teach you those that can help you.

LEAD
320 3135 1 2 M1 Leadership Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility
TextbookTextbook
Stephen Gilliland Sat 9:00AM -
4:50PM
Burkle 12 Hybrid Non-leadership students may request enrollment through dept. consent. $35 fee applies to cover cost of catered lunches for Saturday meetings on campus. Online Tuesday 1/17 6:00-8:00 pm, In person Saturdays 1/21 & 3/11, 9:00 AM–5:00 PM + 5 hours async Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Increasing attention to the impact of business on society has made ethics more important to organizational success than at any time in recent history. Conventional and social media have increased awareness of leader wrongdoings, such as can be seen with the “#MeToo” movement. Society is increasingly calling for leaders to be held accountable for their own actions and those of their organizations. With corporate governance processes driving ethics and the emergence of a new breed of social entrepreneurs and impact investors, leaders need to understand the centrality of ethics in organizations.

LEAD
350 3137 1 2 M2 Leading Change and Innovation
TextbookTextbook
Cynthia M Gilliland Tue 6:00PM -
7:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Non-leadership students may request enrollment through dept. consent. $35 fee applies to cover cost of catered lunches for Saturday meetings on campus. Online meeting on Tuesday, 3/21 from 6pm-8 pm and on-campus on Saturday 4/8 & 5/6 from 9 am-4pm. 7 hours of Asynchronous work posted on 4/5,4/12,4/19,and 4/26 Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This class focuses on planned change management at the individual, interpersonal, and collective/organizational levels of analysis. Students will learn evidence-based best practices for innovating to create, enact, and manage desired change to achieve positive outcomes. Students will develop skills and mindsets as well as acquire tools to act as change agents and will learn to use client-centered, lean innovation, design thinking, and positively-based tools and techniques to identify and create change opportunities with high buy-in and impact.

LEAD
537A 3136 1 2 M1 The Executive Mind
TextbookTextbook
Jeremy Hunter Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Non-leadership students may request enrollment through dept. consent. Online meeting times are on Tuesday from 7pm to 9:50 pm on 1/24-2/21 and Saturday 2/25 from 9am-4pm Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Self-management is the missing link in managerial education. We train managers to manage everything but themselves. However, long-term success and well-being depends on cultivating this vital skill. This course offers a systematic approach to the challenge of managing oneself. From it, you will learn methods and tools that can be applied immediately and practiced for a lifetime.

MATH
231HM 3380 1 4   Mathematical Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Alfonso Castro MonWed 2:45PM -
4:00PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Countable sets, least upper bounds, and metric space topology including compactness, completeness, connectivity, and uniform convergence. Related topics as time permits.

MATH
231HM 3381 2 4   Mathematical Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Lisette DePillis TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Countable sets, least upper bounds, and metric space topology including compactness, completeness, connectivity, and uniform convergence. Related topics as time permits.

MATH
232PO 3382 1 4   Principles of Real Analysis II
TextbookTextbook
Stephan Garcia MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Principles of Real Analysis II. A rigorous study of calculus in Euclidean Spaces including multiple Riemann Integrals, derivatives of transformations, and the inverse function theorem. Prerequisite: Math 231.

MATH
235CM 3327 1 4   Complex Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Asuman Aksoy MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
To Be Determined In-Person CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. An introduction to the theory and application of analytic functions of a complex variable. Prerequisite: Mathematics 60, or permission of the instructor. Offered jointly by CMC and Pomona.

MATH
235SC 3383 1 4   Complex Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Winston Ou MonWedFri 10:00AM -
10:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The beautiful and elegant theorems which are encountered in complex analysis form a cornerstone of mathematics. In this course we will apply familiar concepts such as line integrals and differentiability to complex-valued functions. We will investigate the Cauchy- Riemann equations, and study holomorphic and meromorphic functions via Taylor and Laurent series. Cauchy’s theorem and integral formula along with the calculus of residues will be featured. We will also introduce conformal mappings and harmonic functions. And the prerequisites are pretty much the same. Required: Linear Algebra (Math 60), recommended: Math 101 or Math 131 (231).

MATH
245PO 3384 1 4   Topics in Geometry & Topology
TextbookTextbook
Vin de Silva Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Topic varies from year to year and will be chosen from: Differential Topology, Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries, Knot Theory, Algebraic Topology, and Projective Geometry.

MATH
247HM 3385 1 4   Topology
TextbookTextbook
Francis Su MonWed 2:45PM -
4:00PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Topological spaces, product spaces, quotient spaces, Hausdorff spaces, compactness, connectedness, path connectedness, fundamental groups, homotopy of maps, and covering spaces. Corequisite: Mathematics 131 or permission of instructor. Offered jointly by Harvey Mudd and Pomona Colleges.

MATH
248CM 3085 1 4   Knot Theory
TextbookTextbook
Sam Nelson TueThu 8:10PM -
9:25PM
CMC, Kravis Center-102 In-Person CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ An introduction to the theory of knots, links and other knotted objects from combinatorial, algebraic and geometric perspectives. Topics may include knot diagrams, p-colorings, Alexander,Jones and HOMFLY polynomials, Seifert surfaces, genus, the fundamental group, representations of knot groups, quandles, quandle cocycle invariants, tangles and braids, spatial graphs, surface-links and virtual knots. Pre-requisite: MATH060.

MATH
250PO 3386 1 4   Statistical Methods for Clinical Trials Data
TextbookTextbook
Johanna Hardin TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. A second course in Biostatistics. Emphasis on the most commonly used statistical methods in pharmaceutical and other medical research. Topics such as design of clinical trials, power and sample size determination, contingency table analysis, odds ratio and relative risk, survival analysis.

MATH
251CM 3328 1 4   Probability
TextbookTextbook
Michael O'Neill TueThu 9:35AM -
10:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The main elements of probability theory at an intermediate level. Topics include combinatorial analysis, conditional probabilities, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, central limit theorem, and numerous applications. Students may not receive credit for both Math 251 and Math 257.

MATH
251PO 3387 1 4   Probability
TextbookTextbook
Angel Chavez MonWedFri 9:00AM -
9:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The main elements of probability theory at an intermediate level. Topics include combinatorial analysis, conditional probabilities, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, central limit theorem, and numerous applications. Students may not receive credit for both Math 251 and Math 257.

MATH
252CM 3329 1 4   Statistical Inference
TextbookTextbook
Bhaven Mistry TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
To Be Determined In-Person CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. An introduction to Statistical Inference which assumes knowledge of Probability at the level of Math 151. Topics may include sampling, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, graphical methods of data analysis using software, comparison of two samples by parametric and non-parametric methods, Bayesian methods, linear regression. The course will present the mathematical theory behind the techniques of statistical inference. At the same time, students will gain experience in applying the techniques to data sets drawn from real world examples. Prerequisite: Math 151.

MATH
256 3023 1 4   Stochastic Processes
TextbookTextbook
Henry Schellhorn MonWed 2:30PM -
3:45PM
Burkle 24 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Continuation of Math 251. Properties of independent and dependent random variables, conditional expectation. Topics chosen from Markov processes, second order processes, stationary processes, ergodic theory, Martingales, and renewal theory. Prerequisite: Math 251 or permission of instructor.

MATH
258PO 3388 1 4   Statistical Linear Models
TextbookTextbook
Gabriel Chandler TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Statistical Linear Models. An introduction to analysis of variance (including one-way and two-way fixed effects ANOVA) and linear regression (including simple linear regression, multiple regression, variable selection, stepwise regression and analysis of residual plots). Emphasis will be on both methods and applications to data. Statistical software will be used to analyze data.

MATH
260CM 3330 1 4   Monte Carlo Methods
TextbookTextbook
Mark Huber MonWedFri 9:00AM -
9:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course introduces concepts and statistical techniques that are critical to constructing and analyzing effective simulations, and discusses certain applications for simulation and Monte Carlo methods. Topics include random number generation, simulation-based optimization, model building, bias-variance trade-off, input selection using experimental design, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), and numerical integration.

MATH
264HM 3389 1 4   Scientific Computing
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty MonWed 2:45PM -
4:00PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Computational techniques applied to problems in the sciences and engineering. Modeling of physical problems, computer implementation, analysis of results; use of mathematical software; numerical methods chosen from: solutions of linear and nonlinear algebraic equations, solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations, finite elements, linear programming, optimization algorithms and fast-Fourier transforms.

MATH
268HM 3390 1 4   Algorithms
TextbookTextbook
Chris Stone TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Algorithm design, computer implementation, and analysis of efficiency. Discrete structures, sorting and searching, time and space complexity, and topics selected from algorithms for arithmetic circuits, sorting networks, parallel algorithms, computational geometry, parsing, and pattern-matching.

MATH
268HM 3391 2 4   Algorithms
TextbookTextbook
Chris Stone TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Algorithm design, computer implementation, and analysis of efficiency. Discrete structures, sorting and searching, time and space complexity, and topics selected from algorithms for arithmetic circuits, sorting networks, parallel algorithms, computational geometry, parsing, and pattern-matching.

MATH
271HM 3392 1 4   Abstract Algebra I
TextbookTextbook
Michael Orrison TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Groups, rings, fields and additional topics. Topics in group theory include groups, subgroups, quotient groups, Lagrange's theorem, symmetry groups, and the isomorphism theorems. Topics in Ring theory include Euclidean domains, PIDs, UFDs, fields, polynomial rings, ideal theory, and the isomorphism theorems. In recent years, additional topics have included the Sylow theorems, group actions, modules, representations, and introductory category theory.

MATH
271PO 3393 1 4   Abstract Algebra I
TextbookTextbook
Staff TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Groups, rings, fields and additional topics. Topics in group theory include groups, subgroups, quotient groups, Lagrange's theorem, symmetry groups, and the isomorphism theorems. Topics in Ring theory include Euclidean domains, PIDs, UFDs, fields, polynomial rings, ideal theory, and the isomorphism theorems. In recent years, additional topics have included the Sylow theorems, group actions, modules, representations, and introductory category theory..

MATH
272CM 3331 1 4   Abstract Algebra II: Galois Theory
TextbookTextbook
Leonid Fukshansky TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
To Be Determined In-Person CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://my.cgu.edu/registrar/forms/ In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Topics will be selected from the theories of groups, rings, fields, and modules, with a special emphasis on Galois Theory. Specific topics will include polynomial rings, field extensions, splitting fields, algebraic closure, separability, the Fundamental Theorem of Galois Theory, Galois groups of polynomials, and solvability.

MATH
274HM 3394 1 4   Abstract Albebra II: Representation Theory
TextbookTextbook
Michael Orrison MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Topics covered will include group rings, characters, orthogonality relations, induced representations, application of representation theory, and other select topics from module theory. Prerequisite: Math 271. This course is independent of Math 272 (Abstract Algebra II: Galois Theory), and students may receive credit for both courses.

MATH
280CM 3377 1 4   Partial Differential Equations
TextbookTextbook
Chiu-Yen Kao TueThu 9:35AM -
10:50AM
CMC, Roberts North-12 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Fourier Series, Fourier Transforms, Distributions. Partial Differential Equations: Heat, Wave, Laplace's, Transport, Schr?dinger, Black-Scholes. Reaction-diffusion equations, solitons, and numerical methods. Prerequisites: Math 60 and Math 111.

MATH
281PO 3418 1 4   Dynamical Systems
TextbookTextbook
Ami Radunskaya MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course will consider both discrete and continuous dynamics. In any given year it will include most of the following topics: Linear and nonlinear systems; Bifurcation theory, routes to chaos, symbolic dynamics, Sharkovii's theorem and chaos. Existence and uniqueness theory and dependence on data; Hartman-Grobman and Poincaré-Bendixson theorems, Lyapunov stability theory and stable manifold theory.

MATH
338PO 3395 1 4   Real and Functional Analysis II
TextbookTextbook
Konrad Aguilar TueThu 9:35AM -
10:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location.

MATH
351 3081 1 4   Time Series Data Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Qidi Peng Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Analysis of time series data by means of particular models such as ARIMA. Associated methods of inference and applications. Additional topics may include spectral analysis and state-space models. Prerequisite: A course in probability and at least concurrent enrollment in statistics.

MATH
352 3078 1 4   Nonparametric Statistics
TextbookTextbook
John Angus Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Treatment of statistical questions which do not depend on specific parametric models. Examples are testing for symmetry of a distribution and testing for equality of two distributions. Topics may include bootstrapping and other computer intensive methods. Elementary combinatorial methods will play a major role in the course. Prerequisite: a statistics course at the level of 252 or permission of the instructor.

MATH
353 3084 1 4   Asymptotic Methods in Statistics with Applications
TextbookTextbook
John Angus Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Modes of convergence for random variables and their distributions; central limit theorems; laws of large numbers; statistical large sample theory of functions of sample moments, sample quantiles, rank statistics, and extreme order statistics; asymptotically efficient estimation and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: Math 251 and 252; linear algebra; undergraduate analysis (Math 231 and 232, or equivalent).

MATH
384HM 3396 1 4   Graduate Partial Diff Equations
TextbookTextbook
Alfonso Castro MonWed 9:35AM -
10:50AM
To Be Determined In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Advanced topics in the study of linear and nonlinear partial differential equations. Topics may include the theory of distributions; Hilbert spaces; conservation laws, characteristics and entropy methods; fixed point theory; critical point theory; the calculus of variations and numerical methods. Applications to fluid mechanics, mathematical physics, mathematical biology and related fields. Prerequisites: Mathematics 115 and 131, or Mathematics 180, recommended: Mathematics 132.

MATH
388 3079 1 4   Continuous Mathematical Modeling
TextbookTextbook
Ali Nadim Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Continuous Mathematical Modeling. A course aimed at the construction, simplification, analysis and interpretation of mathematical models, primarily in the form of partial differential equations, arising in the physical and biomedical sciences. Derivation and methods of solution: method of characteristics, separation of variables, Fourier and Laplace transforms. Examples such as traffic flow, steady and transient heat conduction, potential flow, advection-diffusion processes, wave propagation and acoustics. Dimensional analysis and scaling, perturbation theory, and bifurcation analysis. Students will normally work on a modeling project as part of the course. Familiarity with vector calculus, complex variables and differential equations will be helpful.

MATH
393 3080 1 4   Advanced Mathematics Clinic
TextbookTextbook
Allon Percus Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person Permission number required for enrollment. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Normally a continuation of Math 293. The Mathematics Clinic provides applied, real-world research experience. A team of 3-5 students will work on an open-ended research problem from an industrial partner, under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Problems involve a wide array of techniques from mathematical modeling as well as from engineering and computer science. Clinic projects generally address problems of sufficient magnitude and complexity that their analysis, solution and exposition require a significant team effort. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

MATH
462 3082 1 4   Mathematics of Machine Learning
TextbookTextbook
Marina Chugunova Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Machine learning is a rapidly growing field that is concerned with finding patterns in data. It is responsible for tremendous advances in technology, from personalized product recommendations to speech recognition in cell phones. This course material covers theoretical foundations, algorithms, and methodologies for machine learning, emphasizing the role of probability and optimization and exploring a variety of real-world applications. Through lecture examples and programming projects, students will learn how to apply powerful machine learning techniques to new problems. Students are expected to have a solid foundation in calculus and linear algebra as well as exposure to the basic tools of logic and probability, and should be familiar with at least one modern, high-level programming language.

MATH
466 3083 1 4   Advanced Big Data Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Weiqing Gu Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McNassor Room (Harper 53) In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This graduate level course is designed to give students a snapshot of recent techniques used to analyze, statistically and algorithmically, extremely large datasets. To accomplish this goal, the course will start with an applied and quick introduction to necessary optimization background. From there we will introduce students to topics such as spectral graph clustering, fast kernel methods, compressed sensing, among others. We will highlight applications of these methods to diverse areas such as genomics and recommender systems, but the bedrock of the course will be theory. To that end, students are expected to have a solid foundation in probability and analysis, as well as comfort with algorithmic thinking.

MATH
499 3373 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Directed Research Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

MGT
314 3349 1 2 M2 Emerging Technologies
TextbookTextbook
Jacqueline Mohr Sat 9:00AM -
4:50PM
Online Class Online This course is an intensive course. Students will meet on Saturday 3/25 & 4/15, from 9:00 am-5:00 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The aim of this course is to provide students with a strategic and practical understanding of emerging technologies in organizations. Students will learn about opportunities and barriers in leveraging emerging technologies, as well as strategies to realize their potential across a variety of use cases. The course covers a variety of technologies (for example, blockchain, NFTs, climate innovations, artificial intelligence) and includes an emphasis on an “ethical technology mindset.”

MGT
335 3122 1 4   Corporate Finance
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Tue 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of financial decision making, including investment decisions, financing decisions, and their interaction. The course provides the students with the underlying framework of corporate finance including valuation, market efficiency, portfolio theory, agency costs, and information costs. The course will relate financial management to the structure of financial institutions in the U.S. In addition, the course includes a survey of special topics in finance including option pricing, mergers and acquisitions, hedging, and international finance.

MGT
335 3124 2 4   Corporate Finance
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 16 In-Person Please put in Burkle 12, 14, or 16 if possible for boards This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of financial decision making, including investment decisions, financing decisions, and their interaction. The course provides the students with the underlying framework of corporate finance including valuation, market efficiency, portfolio theory, agency costs, and information costs. The course will relate financial management to the structure of financial institutions in the U.S. In addition, the course includes a survey of special topics in finance including option pricing, mergers and acquisitions, hedging, and international finance.

MGT
339 3108 1 4   Financial Derivatives
TextbookTextbook
Rama Malladi Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 22 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course examines financial instruments known as derivatives and the use of these instruments in managing risk. The derivatives market consists of financial contracts in the form of options, forwards, futures, swaps, and a variety of other instruments. The unifying feature of these products is that value or return is ‘derived’ from some other underlying factor. Derivative contracts are used by corporations, investment funds, and individuals to control risk arising from interest rates, exchange rates, stock prices and commodity prices. By some estimates, there is over $1,000 trillion of notional value of derivative contracts currently outstanding. The primary objective of the course is to gain a thorough understanding of various derivative products, including their construction, pricing, payoff structure, and risk management applications. Students will also learn contingent claims analysis, which relies on the concept of arbitrage to develop pricing relationships.

MGT
340 3128 1 4   Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Vijay Sathe Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The focus of this course is on how general managers enhance and sustain business performance. The course covers analytical and conceptual tools that are aids to the development of decision. Its fundamental focus, however, is not on tools but on sharpening skills at developing robust judgments in the face of uncertainty and complexity. The central concept of this course is that of strategy. Strategy is enabled and constrained by the underlying economic and political conditions that prevail in an industry or a country, as well as by the resources available to management.

MGT
345 3109 1 4   Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 12 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a foundation of the fundamental skills they will need to understand, diagnose, and manage organizational behavior in order to attain the organization’s mission more effectively. We will conduct structured classroom exercises geared toward discovering your own strengths and their potential for optimizing your contribution to an organization.

MGT
352 3102 1 4   Marketing Strategy and Planning
TextbookTextbook
Bernard J Jaworski Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 22 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The course is designed to familiarize students with the decision domain of marketing Strategy. This includes the purpose and elements of sound strategy, as well as the managerial tools and processes for generating, communicating and implementing marketing strategies that deliver sustainable competitive advantage to a company, product or brand. This course is designed as an applied course with a strong theoretical foundation. It utilizes an emphasis on student activities, supplemented by lectures and case discussions. There will also be a group field project which compares and contrasts the strategies of competing firms. This course gives the student the unique advantage of letting you practice the concepts and skills of modern marketing strategy in a simulated marketing environment.

MGT
358 3093 1 2 M2 Negotiations & Conflict Resolution
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 12 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The course will provide students in engineering, the sciences, technology development, business management, and related fields with an understanding of the techniques for negotiation and decision making in a variety of contexts. Exercises will involve two basic types of negotiation: (1) adversarial, non-collaborative negotiations or win-lose situations, and (2) distributive or win-win negotiations in which each party’s position is enhanced. The teaching approach involves elements of mathematics, particularly game theory and strategy, but the class is not mathematical and there is no math requirement. Also examined are the roles of personal psychology and behavior in negotiation. The concepts to be learned are applicable both within a company or team and also in structuring relationships with third parties. There are various contexts in which negotiation principles are applied by managers including principles of contract negotiation, team building, dispute resolution, auctions and bidding, voting, and coalition formation. The course will proceed systematically from relatively simple two party distributive negotiations, to more complex two party negotiations, to two-sided negotiations involving multiple parties, to multi-sided negotiations, to the use of mediators and arbitrators for difficult or complex situations. While this may appear abstract and theoretical, the primary learning mechanism will be through multiple practical exercises conducted mostly during class time.

MGT
360 3131 1 4   Operations Management
TextbookTextbook
Munirpallam Appadorai Venkataramanan Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 12 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The objective of this course is to develop a general managerial perspective on the role of operations management in the function of a firm, at both the tactical and strategic levels. The course will offer a broad survey of concepts and techniques in managing operations, with particular emphasis on a number of major operations management issues that can significantly affect the competitive position of a firm in the marketplace. Through the discussions of these issues, the students can also develop a good understanding about how operations should interact with other functional areas such as marketing and finance. We will also study coordination and incentives across multiple groups or players in a supply chain. While tactical models and decisions are part of this course, the emphasis is on the qualitative insights needed by general managers or management consultants.

MGT
360 3132 2 4   Operations Management
TextbookTextbook
Munirpallam Appadorai Venkataramanan Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The objective of this course is to develop a general managerial perspective on the role of operations management in the function of a firm, at both the tactical and strategic levels. The course will offer a broad survey of concepts and techniques in managing operations, with particular emphasis on a number of major operations management issues that can significantly affect the competitive position of a firm in the marketplace. Through the discussions of these issues, the students can also develop a good understanding about how operations should interact with other functional areas such as marketing and finance. We will also study coordination and incentives across multiple groups or players in a supply chain. While tactical models and decisions are part of this course, the emphasis is on the qualitative insights needed by general managers or management consultants.

MGT
365 3325 1 4   The Science of Extraordinary Customer Experience
TextbookTextbook
Paul Zak Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 26 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The retail apocalypse, quiet quitting, failed marketing, ineffective loyalty programs; all these frustrate customers and drive them away. This class uses the science of extraordinary experiences to show students how to drive up customer lifetime value (CLV). The class will include a business client from whom the class will collect data and analyze it in order make the experiences the client offer extraordinary.

MGT
366 3096 1 2 M1 Leadership Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility
TextbookTextbook
Stephen Gilliland Sat 9:00AM -
5:00PM
Burkle 12 Hybrid $35 fee applies to cover cost of catered lunches for Saturday meetings on campus. Online Tuesday 1/17 6:00-8:00 pm, In person Saturdays 1/21 & 3/11, 9:00 AM–5:00 PM + 5 hours async Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course examines individual, organizational, and societal forces that shape ethical behavior in business. We examine "Who am I?", "Who are we?", and "What kind of company are we?" ethical challenges. Students will gain a solid understanding of the role of ethics in leadership and will address the challenge of managing tradeoffs in ethical decision making. Starting with bounded ethical decision making and the role of corporate culture in shaping ethical actions, we conclude by considering the impact of corporate social responsibility and the triple bottom line in shaping corporate values.

MGT
378 3107 1 2 M2 Social Media Analytics
TextbookTextbook
Staff Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course helps marketeers and product managers to upgrade their skill set for the future of digital and social marketing. We will learn to expand our analytics toolkit from descriptive analytics (running Google Analytics) and predictive analytics (conducting A/B testing) to prescriptive analytics (building a recommendation engine). You will build a basic recommendation engine (using Microsoft Azure Machine Learning) that can help a product sell itself or find look-alike users. The course is broken into parts so that you can evolve your assignment step-by-step or session-by-session with each lecture providing new tools for the next step.

MGT
378 3107 1 2 M2 Social Media Analytics
TextbookTextbook
Staff Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course helps marketeers and product managers to upgrade their skill set for the future of digital and social marketing. We will learn to expand our analytics toolkit from descriptive analytics (running Google Analytics) and predictive analytics (conducting A/B testing) to prescriptive analytics (building a recommendation engine). You will build a basic recommendation engine (using Microsoft Azure Machine Learning) that can help a product sell itself or find look-alike users. The course is broken into parts so that you can evolve your assignment step-by-step or session-by-session with each lecture providing new tools for the next step.

MGT
379A 3113 1 1 M1 Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 14 In-Person This practicum is an underlying leadership development substrate to our technical education and leadership curriculum. Through intensive, lab-based work, students will learn the emotional and behavioral skills to begin a life-long practice of leadership. This practicum reflects the philosophy articulated by Warren Bennis that leadership cannot be taught, but rather must be learned. The practicum will not “create leaders” but rather will help students develop the tools, practices and insights that are required if one is to become a leader over time.

MGT
379A 3113 1 1 M1 Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 14 In-Person This course is an intensive course with meetings dates of 1/23,2/6,2/20, and 3/6 In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This practicum is an underlying leadership development substrate to our technical education and leadership curriculum. Through intensive, lab-based work, students will learn the emotional and behavioral skills to begin a life-long practice of leadership. This practicum reflects the philosophy articulated by Warren Bennis that leadership cannot be taught, but rather must be learned. The practicum will not “create leaders” but rather will help students develop the tools, practices and insights that are required if one is to become a leader over time.

MGT
379A 3115 2 1 M1 Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online This practicum is an underlying leadership development substrate to our technical education and leadership curriculum. Through intensive, lab-based work, students will learn the emotional and behavioral skills to begin a life-long practice of leadership. This practicum reflects the philosophy articulated by Warren Bennis that leadership cannot be taught, but rather must be learned. The practicum will not “create leaders” but rather will help students develop the tools, practices and insights that are required if one is to become a leader over time.

MGT
379A 3115 2 1 M1 Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online This course will meet on 1/25, 2/8, 2/22, and 3/8 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This practicum is an underlying leadership development substrate to our technical education and leadership curriculum. Through intensive, lab-based work, students will learn the emotional and behavioral skills to begin a life-long practice of leadership. This practicum reflects the philosophy articulated by Warren Bennis that leadership cannot be taught, but rather must be learned. The practicum will not “create leaders” but rather will help students develop the tools, practices and insights that are required if one is to become a leader over time.

MGT
379B 3334 1 1 M2 Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 24 In-Person This practicum is an underlying leadership development substrate to our technical education and leadership curriculum. Through intensive, lab-based work, students will learn the emotional and behavioral skills to begin a life-long practice of leadership. This practicum reflects the philosophy articulated by Warren Bennis that leadership cannot be taught, but rather must be learned. The practicum will not "create leaders" but rather will help students develop the tools, practices and insights that are required if one is to become a leader over time.

MGT
379B 3334 1 1 M2 Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 24 In-Person This is an intensive course that meets on 3/20,4/3,4/17, and 5/1. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This practicum is an underlying leadership development substrate to our technical education and leadership curriculum. Through intensive, lab-based work, students will learn the emotional and behavioral skills to begin a life-long practice of leadership. This practicum reflects the philosophy articulated by Warren Bennis that leadership cannot be taught, but rather must be learned. The practicum will not "create leaders" but rather will help students develop the tools, practices and insights that are required if one is to become a leader over time.

MGT
379B 3335 2 1 M2 Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online This practicum is an underlying leadership development substrate to our technical education and leadership curriculum. Through intensive, lab-based work, students will learn the emotional and behavioral skills to begin a life-long practice of leadership. This practicum reflects the philosophy articulated by Warren Bennis that leadership cannot be taught, but rather must be learned. The practicum will not "create leaders" but rather will help students develop the tools, practices and insights that are required if one is to become a leader over time.

MGT
379B 3335 2 1 M2 Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online This is an intensive course that meets on 3/22,4/5,4/19, and 5/3 occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This practicum is an underlying leadership development substrate to our technical education and leadership curriculum. Through intensive, lab-based work, students will learn the emotional and behavioral skills to begin a life-long practice of leadership. This practicum reflects the philosophy articulated by Warren Bennis that leadership cannot be taught, but rather must be learned. The practicum will not "create leaders" but rather will help students develop the tools, practices and insights that are required if one is to become a leader over time.

MGT
380 3101 1 2 M1 Drucker Philosophy
TextbookTextbook
Bernard J Jaworski Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
Burkle 12 Online Intensive Saturday course that meets on 1/28, 2/11, 3/4, 9:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00-3:00 pm + 6 hours async Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course focuses on self-management, professionalization, written communication, and critical thinking

MGT
380B 3338 1 1   Create Your Future
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 22 In-Person This course is scheduled to meet on Mondays on 1/30, 2/27, 3/27, and 4/24 from 1:00-3:50 pm In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
380B 3337 2 1   Create Your Future
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online Could will meet on schedule dates on Mondays: 1/30,2/27,3/27, and 4/24 from7:00pm to 9:50 p.m. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
380B 3336 3 1   Create Your Future
TextbookTextbook
Staff Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online This course meets on the following Wednesdays: 2/1,3/1,3/29, and 4/26 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:50 p.m. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
380B 3336 3 1   Create Your Future
TextbookTextbook
Staff Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online This course meets on the following Wednesdays: 2/1,3/1,3/29, and 4/26 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:50 p.m. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
382 3120 1 2 M2 Macroeconomics, Government Economics, and International Trade
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Wed 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. A traditional MBA class in Macroeconomics teaches the basic tools for understanding the business cycle and how it affects business decisions. The business cycle refers to economy-wide problems like unemployment and inflation. Understanding the sources and the policy responses to these macroeconomic changes is important to all business leaders. But modern macroeconomics cannot be realistically understood without including other areas such as government spending, taxation, economic growth, and international trade. This class will discuss the models that economists and policy makers use to explain the business cycle and to form an appropriate policy response. In discussing these macroeconomic models and the policies that they prescribe, we will incorporate concepts from Government Economics (also known as Public Economics) and International Economics so that the student will be able to see the critical connection between these areas.

MGT
388 3095 1 4   Predictive Analytics
TextbookTextbook
Gary Gaukler Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is a follow-on to Business Analytics I (MGT 306). Whereas Business Analytics I focuses on fundamental tools of analytics and applies them to "Little Data," this course is designed as an exploration of "Big Data" and predictive modeling. The course starts with a discussion of visualization techniques for large, multi-dimensional data sets. We will examine what makes for compelling data storytelling and will explore the Edward Tufte principles for correct and impactful data visualizations. This first segment of the course will make extensive use of Tableau software. In the second segment of this course, we will explore predictive modeling approaches to big data analytics. We will discuss supervised and unsupervised learning techniques applied to realistic data sets with applications in marketing, operations, and finance. For this segment we will use Microsoft Azure Machine Learning, one of the premier big data analytics tools available today, as the platform. This course is designed as a "lecture + lab" course, which means that approximately half of each 3-hour class session is devoted to lecture and introduction of new concepts, and the other half is dedicated to hands-on implementation of these concepts on the computer, by you. There is also a project component to this course that will have you work in teams on a big data analytics project of your choice. Thus, you will get extensive hands-on practice. By the end of the course you will be proficient in two of the hottest analytics tools in the business world available today and you will be able to appropriately apply advanced business analytics techniques to real-world "big data" problems.

MGT
402 3097 1 4   Asset Management Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Jonathan R. Leong, William Hippler Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 22 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Theories of asset management are presented via textbook and other readings, lectures, case studies, and student and guest speaker presentations. Students will be responsible for inviting some of the guest speakers with consultation by the instructor. Asset management firms establish and review investment policy, conduct investment research, determine strategies to be implemented, select securities, enter and track orders, measure and report performance, and manage client relations. We will study all these activities in the course.

MGT
410 3092 1 2 M1 Entrepreneurial Finance
TextbookTextbook
Zeynep Ayca Altintig Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Looking at the world of start-up and early stage company financing. The different sources of capital available to start-up firms and the valuations relevant to these funding stages.

MGT
415 3103 1 2 M2 Startup Business Models
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 22 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The course will assess the startup concept and its viability, starting with designing a clear business model (what you offer, how, and why) and building out the appropriate revenue model (market size, revenue and profit potential). Course participants will learn how to generate and tighten the logic of its approach to the market, from both a competitive and financial perspective, with a focus on speed to market and viability. The course is unique in teaching a method and applying it to an actual launch opportunity that each participant expects to take on.

MGT
499 3415 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Supervision Dates and times to course are To Be Determined. Supervision Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

MGT
513 3130 1 4   Business Analytics
TextbookTextbook
Munirpallam Appadorai Venkataramanan Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 24 Hybrid Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course will hone students' ability to perform quantitative analysis to enhance decision-making. It covers basic statistical principles and explores their usefulness and limitations, how to recognize when they can be applied beneficially, and issues involved in utilizing their results. Cases are used to introduce concepts and ground analytical results in realistic business environments.

MGT
514 3094 1 2 M2 Marketing Management
TextbookTextbook
Haakon T Brown Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 22 Hybrid Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course examines the process of strategic marketing management and considers its role within organizations. It presents the fundamentals of the marketing concept and considers the relationship between the marketing concept and other concepts such as innovation and entrepreneurship. The course considers tools and methods used to examine marketing environments, understand consumer and organizational buying behavior, segment markets and position products

MGT
525A 3117 1 1 M1 Leadership Practicum A
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Sat 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 26 Hybrid This course is an intensive course. The In-person date is for Saturday 3/25 1:00-3:50 pm; online Tuesdays 2/21, 2/28, 3/7 7:00-9:50 pm Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. "Management can be taught, but leadership must be learned." This quotation from Warren Bennis reflects the current state of the play in leadership development. Although teaching leadership concepts and theories in the classroom is important, researchers and practitioners agree that this is not how people actually develop leadership skills or become leaders. Rather, developing as a leader is a lifelong process of integrating experiences, experimenting with behaviors, encountering unfamiliar contexts and challenging situations, emulating role models, building self-awareness, and finding oneself and one’s purpose. There are no clear prescriptions in this process, and each person’s journey is his/her own. However, there are skills, habits, insights, and attitudes you can bring to this lifelong process that can enhance (or also hinder) your ability to develop leadership. The aim of this course is to teach you those that can help you.

MGT
525A 3368 1 1   Leadership Practicum A
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Sat 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 26 Hybrid This course is an intensive course. The In-person date is for Saturday 3/25 1:00-3:50 pm; online Tuesdays 2/21, 2/28, 3/7 7:00-9:50 pm Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. "Management can be taught, but leadership must be learned." This quotation from Warren Bennis reflects the current state of the play in leadership development. Although teaching leadership concepts and theories in the classroom is important, researchers and practitioners agree that this is not how people actually develop leadership skills or become leaders. Rather, developing as a leader is a lifelong process of integrating experiences, experimenting with behaviors, encountering unfamiliar contexts and challenging situations, emulating role models, building self-awareness, and finding oneself and one’s purpose. There are no clear prescriptions in this process, and each person’s journey is his/her own. However, there are skills, habits, insights, and attitudes you can bring to this lifelong process that can enhance (or also hinder) your ability to develop leadership. The aim of this course is to teach you those that can help you.

MGT
525B 3314 1 1 M2 Leadership Practicum B
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Sat 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 12 Hybrid This course is an intensive, with meeting dates In-person Saturday 5/6 1:00-3:50 pm; online Tuesdays 4/4, 4/18, 5/9 7:00-9:50 pm Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Management can be taught, but leadership must be learned.” This quotation from Warren Bennis reflects the current state of the play in leadership development. Although teaching leadership concepts and theories in the classroom is important, researchers and practitioners agree that this is not how people actually develop leadership skills or become leaders. Rather, developing as a leader is a lifelong process of integrating experiences, experimenting with behaviors, encountering unfamiliar contexts and challenging situations, emulating role models, building self-awareness, and finding oneself and one’s purpose. There are no clear prescriptions in this process, and each person’s journey is his/her own. However, there are skills, habits, insights, and attitudes you can bring to this lifelong process that can enhance (or also hinder) your ability to develop leadership. The aim of this course is to teach you those that can help you.

MGT
537A 3099 1 2 M1 The Practice of Self-Mastery 1
TextbookTextbook
Staff Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Self-Management is the missing link in managerial education. We train managers to manage everthing but themselves. However, long-term success and well being depends on cultivating this vital skill. This course offers a systematic approach to the challenge of managing oneself. From it, you will learn methods and tools that can be applied immediately and practiced for a lifetime.

MGT
537A 3099 1 2 M1 The Practice of Self-Mastery 1
TextbookTextbook
Staff Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Self-Management is the missing link in managerial education. We train managers to manage everthing but themselves. However, long-term success and well being depends on cultivating this vital skill. This course offers a systematic approach to the challenge of managing oneself. From it, you will learn methods and tools that can be applied immediately and practiced for a lifetime.

MGT
537B 3100 1 2 M2 The Practice of Self-Mastery 2
TextbookTextbook
Jeremy Hunter Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Hybrid Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Managers are trained to manage everything but themselves. This class is designed to fill this gap in managerial education. MGT 537 Modules 1 and 2 provide systematic training in self-management. This is NOT about managing time or keeping a tidy desk, but about becoming aware of and transforming patterns of thought, speech, and action that undermine your effectiveness and well-being. This class is CHALLENGING. You will learn state-of-the art research about positive psychological functioning as well as methods and tools for cultivating focus and calm in challenging situations. Not for the fainthearted.

MGT
550 3127 1 2 M1 Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Vijay Sathe Sat 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 26 Hybrid This is an intensive course. Meetings will be In-person Saturday 1/21 & 2/18 1:00-3:50 pm; online Tuesdays 1/17-2/14 7:00-9:50 pm Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Recent work on strategy challenges the notion of sustainable competitive advantage derived from industry analysis, product market portfolio selection, and their resource allocation. Although these concepts, tools, and techniques are useful, their durability and value need to be assessed in a world of intense global competition and instant communication, where competitive advantage may not be sustained for long. Success also depends on outpacing competition, creating new industry boundaries, making new competitive rules, and stretching and leveraging available resources and capabilities.

MUSIC
231 3296 1 2 - 4   Clarinet
TextbookTextbook
Michael Yoshimi  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student's academic advisor, the student, and the instructor prior to registering for this class.

MUSIC
231 3297 2 2 - 4   Clarinet
TextbookTextbook
Margaret Thornhill  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student's academic advisor, the student, and the instructor prior to registering for this class.

MUSIC
232 3298 1 2 - 4   Double Bass
TextbookTextbook
Ryan Baird  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
233 3299 1 2 - 4   Flute
TextbookTextbook
Keren Schweitzer  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student, and the instructor prior to registering for this class.

MUSIC
234 3420 1 2 - 4   Guitar
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person This course will be taught by Jason Yoshida, with arranged hours. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
239 3300 1 2 - 4   Baroque Cello
TextbookTextbook
Jaap Ter Linden  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Individual instruction in performing the cello in the style of the baroque period.

MUSIC
241 3301 1 2 - 4   Piano
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
248 3302 1 2 - 4   Violin
TextbookTextbook
Lucy Karelyn Lewis  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
249 3407 1 2 - 4   Violoncello
TextbookTextbook
Marek Szpakiewicz  -
No Room Needed In-Person This course has arranged hours. The Instructor is Marek Szpakiewicz In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student's academic advisor, the student, and the instructor prior to registering for this class.

MUSIC
250 3303 1 2 - 4   Voice
TextbookTextbook
Helene A Quintana  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
250 3304 2 2 - 4   Voice
TextbookTextbook
Camelia Voin  -
No Room Needed In-Person This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
251 3305 1 2 - 4   Conducting
TextbookTextbook
David J Rentz  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
251 3306 2 2 - 4   Conducting
TextbookTextbook
Miguel Harth-Bedoya  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
258 3399 1 2 - 4   Viola da Gamba
TextbookTextbook
Jaap Ter Linden  -
Online Class Online This course has arranged hours. The Instructor: Jaap ter Linden will communicate via canvas. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student, and the instructor prior to registering for this class.

MUSIC
259 3307 1 2 - 4   Fortepiano
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
270 3291 1 1   Performance Forum
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim Thu 10:00AM -
12:50PM
Art 126 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course is essentially a playing/master class open to all Music students enrolled in performance programs, as well as other Music students by permission of the instructor. Students will perform regularly and be critiqued by the instructor and other course members. A strong emphasis will be placed on historical performance practices as outlined in primary sources, thus periodic reading assignments from performance treatises throughout history will comprise an important part of the course. 4 units of MUS 270 are required of doctoral students enrolled in keyboard performance programs.

MUSIC
293 3312 1 2 - 4   Composition
TextbookTextbook
Edward Zeliff  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
299RP 3308 1 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 3309 2 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Helene A Quintana  -
No Room Needed In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
301B 3292 1 4   Music Literature and Historical Styles Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Mark Howard Fri 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Art 126 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Designed to provide an overview of music literature from the Middle Ages to the mid-twentieth century with concentrated analysis of representative works, using analytical techniques appropriate for the period under discussion. Although this core sequence concentrates on Western music, comparison, as well as comparative methodologies, with other world music cultures may be introduced.

MUSIC
301RP 3440 1 0   Recording Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
To Be Determined In-Person Recording Preparation is available to music students who have completed qualifying exam but would like to continue to meet with studio instructor for completing recording project. The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
316 3293 1 4   American Film Music: Literature and Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Peter Boyer Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 26 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. A study of music for American films from its origins in the "silent" film era, through the so-called "Golden Age" of the 1930s and '40s, and up to the present day. Examination of significant trends in the history of American film scoring and their relationship to developments in American cinema, both technological and cultural. Discussion of the contributions of the most significant American film composers, and analysis of key film scores, with emphasis on the interaction between music and the other cinematic elements. The area of focus in the course is “mainstream” Hollywood narrative films.

MUSIC
400M 3294 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Independent Studies Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

MUSIC
406 3311 1 4   20th & 21st Century Music
TextbookTextbook
Peter Boyer Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 26 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. A graduate-level survey of concert music literature in Europe and the United States from approximately 1900 to the present. The main subjects of focus are musical style and structure during this period, and of the many remarkable changes which have occurred in the last century. Also examined are the relationships of concert music with major historical, cultural and political events, aesthetic and philosophical movements, and technological developments.

MUSIC
499 3295 1 0   Doctoral Study (DMA and PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Independent Studies Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PFF
530 3002 1 0   Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education
TextbookTextbook
Shelby Lamar Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Session Online Instructor: Jonathan Aragon. Free for current students. Time and work for this course are equivalent to a 4-unit course. To earn the College Teaching Certificate, you also must complete the PFF 531 course, Teaching Practicum and Portfolio.  Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course invites you on a transformative journey to develop the mindsets to become an ethical, agile leader of learning. We present teaching as a transdisciplinary and inclusive future-focused endeavor for positive learning and development in diverse settings, within and beyond the classroom. In doing so, we engage with the question of how we can effectively and ethically respond to increasingly complex global and institutional contexts in preparing learners holistically for their futures. Working collaboratively in multidisciplinary teams, we will use systems, complexity, and design thinking frameworks to explore student identities and diversity in our classrooms, the changing global paradigms that shift our teaching missions and methods, and what learning sciences and the ethics of education tell us about engagement and motivation. We will also draw from other key frameworks such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL), Active Learning, and Good Work in this exploration. We will work reflexively by integrating a Portfolio-based approach individually and in teams to explore and document our own assumptions, values, and beliefs about education and how these transform in the light of our discoveries about ethical, agile teaching. Our goal will be to co-create pedagogical principles that transcend disciplinary teaching and learning cultures toward agile, ethical leadership of learning in our diverse educational and work contexts. To earn the College Teaching Certificate, you also must complete the PFF 531 course, Pedagogy Practicum and Portfolio.

PFF
531 3003 1 0   Teaching Practicum & Portfolio
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Shelby Lamar, . Faculty Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Session Online Instructor: Holly Eva Allen Free for current students. Time and work for this course are equivalent to a 4-unit course. Final course for the College Teaching Certificate. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. You must have completed the course, Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education (listed as PFF 530, PFF 520, or TNDY 430), to enroll in this course as it is a prerequisite for PFF 531 Teaching Practicum and Portfolio. This class structures your progress through the teaching practicum and completion of all the teaching portfolio items for the College Teaching Certificate. In this course, you will apply the principles and frameworks from “Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education” into practice. The class is presented through an online, asynchronous format with coaching modules and a structured assignment submission and feedback process. Using the work that you began in “Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education”, you will complete your teaching philosophy statement, diversity statement, and sample course design and syllabus. In addition, you will develop a sample learning management system course and a teacher-scholar website. The course culminates in a final integrated reflection of your entire PFF journey toward becoming an inclusive, future-focused educator.

PFF
531 3398 2 0   Teaching Practicum & Portfolio
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Shelby Lamar, . Faculty Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Free for current students. Time and work for this course are equivalent to a 4-unit course. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. You must have completed the course, Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education (listed as PFF 530, PFF 520, or TNDY 430), to enroll in this course as it is a prerequisite for PFF 531 Teaching Practicum and Portfolio. This class structures your progress through the teaching practicum and completion of all the teaching portfolio items for the College Teaching Certificate. In this course, you will apply the principles and frameworks from “Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education” into practice. The class is presented through an online, asynchronous format with coaching modules and a structured assignment submission and feedback process. Using the work that you began in “Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education”, you will complete your teaching philosophy statement, diversity statement, and sample course design and syllabus. In addition, you will develop a sample learning management system course and a teacher-scholar website. The course culminates in a final integrated reflection of your entire PFF journey toward becoming an inclusive, future-focused educator.

PHIL
499 3358 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
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. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Independent Studies Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PP
302 3150 1 4   American Political Behavior
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Tyler T. Reny Wed 2:00PM -
3:50PM
Harper 1 Hybrid Course will have a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This seminar provides a thorough overview of the current research on political behavior. We will survey the literature on party identification, political sophistication, voting, ideology, information processing, tolerance, participation and turnout, and public opinion. In addition, students will explore the various methodological strategies for scientific inquiry in this area, develop important and innovative student research programs and prepare for qualifying examinations through comprehensive reviews of the literature.

PP
305 3408 1 4   Congressional-Executive Institutions and Policymaking
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Carlos A. Algara Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 22 Hybrid Course will have a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The course surveys the dynamics of executive-con-gressional relations by examining institutionalist and leadership theories. Particular attention will be paid to changes in the executive-congressional relationship over time, and the underlying sources of conflict and cooperation between the two branches.

PP
331 3152 1 4   Policy Evaluation
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Javier Rodriguez Thu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 126 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course will address alternative models for understanding and evaluating public policy, ranging from those based on traditional welfare economics to others based on political philosophy. Case applications for each of the major models will be discussed. Research design tailored to the appropriate conceptual approach and the practical requirements of the research setting will be explored. Each student should develop a working knowledge of how to consider, design, and manage applied research studies in a range of policy areas.

PP
338 3153 1 4   Policy Design & Implementation
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Robert Klitgaard Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online This course will have a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This graduate seminar explores classic topics in policy analysis and evaluation, such as market and non-market failures, estimating the effects of policy changes, and implementation. It also explores newer themes such as disadvantage and stigma, public-private-nonprofit partnerships, and processes to engage citizens and policymakers.

PP
400M 3357 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
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. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Online Independent Study Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for independent research with instructor guidance. Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

PP
405 3406 1 4   Comparative Environmental Policy and Politics
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Paul Steinberg Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Harper 65 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course examines one of the most remarkable political developments of the past century: the rise, within a single generation, of environmental concern and associated social movements and public policies in far-flung societies around the globe. What was once the preoccupation of small numbers of citizens in wealthy countries has become a major global trend inspiring political action from Rio to Budapest, Hong Kong, Lagos, and Tehran. This affords us several opportunities. First, we will switch from the wide-angle lens of "Saving the Planet" – symbolized by the image of Earth seen from outer space – to take a closer look at the political challenges faced by environmental advocates in diverse domestic settings. Specific topics include comparative political systems, policymaking styles, changes in values, environmental movements, state-society relations, authoritarian regimes, democratization, resource conflicts, decentralization, policy reform, gender analysis, and European unification. We will also use the environment as a window into broader themes in comparative politics – the subfield of political science that compares domestic politics around the world. Students will learn how to work more effectively in foreign settings by assessing the political context in which technological and policy innovations are applied. Finally, the subject allows us to study one of the leading edges of environmental research as it unfolds, lending insight into the practice of professional research. This course is appropriate for graduate or undergraduate students. No prior exposure to political science or environmental studies is required, and we will draw on the respective strengths and interests of participants. Sessions will include discussions of core readings, lectures, and student presentations.

PP
481 3155 1 4   Introduction to Statistical Analysis
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Javier Rodriguez Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 126 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course concentrates on the application of statistical techniques to social and political problems and data. Topics covered include sampling distributions and statistical probability, chi square, testing of the difference of means, analysis of variance, correlation and regression, and factor analysis. Students complete a number of computer-based assignments. Class is equivalent to INST 481.

PP
485 3156 1 4   Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research
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Melissa Rogers Mon 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 108 Hybrid This course will have weekly asynchronous components. Students will be notified via canvas. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course introduces students to qualitative research methods, general research design principles, and mixed method approaches to social science. The main goal of the course is to provide students with knowledge on the benefits and limitations of the different research methods as well as to teach students how to best choose methods that fit the research question at hand. The course will also provide students with tools that are necessary to apply qualitative and mixed methods approaches to their own research. The first part of the course introduces research design principles, especially inference and causality. The next part of the course addresses specific qualitative methods, such as case studies, interviews, focus groups, fieldwork, participant observation, and content analysis. The third part of the course discusses how to mix methods appropriately within research to gain maximum leverage on causal analysis. While there are no formal prerequisites, a background in statistical methods such as that attained in PP 481 is helpful.

PP
487L 3345 1 4   Applied Data Analysis: Limited Dependent Variables and MLE
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Carlos A. Algara Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Harper 65 Hybrid Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course deals with more advance topics in the use of statistical methods beyond ordinary least squares (OLS) estimation, with emphasis on applied analysis of political data in the R computing environment. Topics include: highlighting the fundamental problem of causal inference, shortcomings of OLS regression estimation for limited dependent variables (LDVs), the properties of maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), and application of MLE models (i.e., binomial, unordered and ordered multinomial, and event count models) to political science research questions leveraging these LDVs.

PP
499 3353 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Online Independent Study Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for independent research with instructor guidance. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PSYCH
306B 3192 1 2   Directed Research: Social Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Michael Hogg Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 31 In-Person Course has an irregular meeting pattern. Class meets on specific dates: Jan 24,Feb 7 ,Feb 21,March 7,March 28,April 11 & April 25. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
306E 3216 1 2   Directed Research: Evaluation & Applied Research Methods and Positive Developmental
TextbookTextbook
Wanda D. Casillas Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The purpose of this course is to provide a broad background in conducting research on evaluation and to help students successfully complete the first year of the Ph.D. program. Guided by the instructor, students will articulate research interests, build writing skills, explore career goals, and discuss professional development issues in the field of evaluation. This course is also designed to help students navigate CGU, available resources, and program requirements. The goals of the fall semester are to identify and work for a research advisor, formulate a testable research idea, and gain mastery of the literature in that topic area. By the end of the spring semester, students are expected to turn in the full thesis proposal that has been signed off by two faculty members. This proposal is intended to serve as the basis for the first-year project/master’s thesis.

PSYCH
306F 3200 1 2   Directed Research: Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Reichard Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 24 In-Person This course has an irregular meeting pattern. The course is going to be held on the following dates: 1/17, 2/2, 2/16, 3/2, 3/16, 3/30, 4/13, 4/27, 5/11 In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
308C 3190 1 2 M1 Applied Multiple Regression
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 16 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This module covers bivariate and multivariate correlation and regression with an emphasis on applications of multiple regression to data analysis.

PSYCH
308D 3191 1 2 M2 Categorical Data Analysis
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueThu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 16 In-Person This course meets every Tuesday and Thursday during Module 2. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Categorical Data Analysis. This is a broad topic and includes various types of procedures. We will cover chi-square tests, binary logistic regression, discriminant function analysis, and moderation and mediation. We will also discuss resampling methods such as bootstrapping as well as non-parametric statistical tests. This course is required of all first-year students in the M.A. and the Ph.D. programs in DBOS. All examples are presented using both SPSS and R software.

PSYCH
311B 3201 1 0 - 4   Writing Seminar
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Kathy Pezdek Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. In this course, students will have experience presenting their research in many different formats to many different audiences. These include, a conference presentation, "elevator talk", a job talk, an executive summary, and papers of varying lengths. This course is appropriate for students at all levels in the program, as long as they have a research project well underway.

PSYCH
315F 3219 1 2 M1 Factor Analysis
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 12 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. The goal of this course is to introduce the student to applications of factor analysis. The focus of the course will be on practical issues, such as relevant logical underpinnings, assumptions, interpretations, pitfalls, and computer programs. The course will require you to assemble a portfolio of various applications of factor analysis, and to develop your own project on some topic related to factor analysis.

PSYCH
315H 3221 1 2 M2 Structural Equation Modeling
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 12 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Structural equation modeling is a statistical technique for estimating interrelations in a model containing multiple predictors and outcomes. Theoretical issues and practical applications will involve path analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, hybrid and latent predictive models, and other uses of latent factors. The course involves assembling a portfolio of weekly homework assignments. For the final project, students are expected to hypothesize a model, test the fit against their own data, and write a full-length manuscript. Prerequisite: Psych 308c

PSYCH
315J 3207 1 2   Survey Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Jason Siegel Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 214 In-Person This is a practically oriented course on methods of survey research that covers the planning and administration of survey questionnaires, sampling, the construction of questionnaires and interviews, principles of field work and coding, and the analysis of questionnaire data. During the module, class members will carry out a joint survey research project, making use of their learning about all phases of survey research.

PSYCH
315J 3207 1 2   Survey Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Jason Siegel Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 214 In-Person This course is only for those who took 315J in the Fall 2022. This Class meets -1/18, 2/1, 2/15, 3/1, 3/8, 4/5, 4/12, 4/19 In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This is a practically oriented course on methods of survey research that covers the planning and administration of survey questionnaires, sampling, the construction of questionnaires and interviews, principles of field work and coding, and the analysis of questionnaire data. During the module, class members will carry out a joint survey research project, making use of their learning about all phases of survey research.

PSYCH
315MM 3187 1 4   Bibliometric Methods
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Reichard Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. During the process of learning and reviewing a body of literature, you may find yourself wondering: what are the most impactful papers in this field? Who are the most important authors? How can I be sure I’ve identified all the essential articles? Bibliometric methods leverage various types of document meta-data to efficiently and objectively identify and organize the key papers and authors in a particular field of study. In essence, bibliometric methods provide a clear, systematic structure for reviewing published literature on any field of study or broad topic. The purpose of this course is to provide you knowledge and skill in implementing various bibliometric methods (e.g., histography, co-citation analysis, and bibliometric coupling). We will review the logic and objectives of bibliometric methods, learn how to analyze citation data using bibliometric software, and generate and interpret network maps. With the tool of bibliometric methods at your disposal, you will be well-positioned to understand the ongoing narrative within a field of study and craft an innovative, data-driven review paper. Over the course of the semester, you will complete a bibliometric study and write a complete review paper. Thus, the course is highly recommended for PhD students who will be aided in completing their review paper portfolio requirement.

PSYCH
315RR 3213 1 4   Qualitative Research Methods Practicum
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Kendall Bronk Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 119 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course is designed for students who want to publish a qualitative research study or a qualitative evaluation. Students will need to have taken either Advanced Qualitative Research Methods (315Q) or Qualitative Research Methods for Evaluation (325W) as a pre-requisite. Students will also need to have a qualitative study well underway by the time the semester begins. That means students will have designed their studies, developed and pilot tested their measures, and collected the majority of their data in advance of the first class meeting. (Much, if not all, of this work should have been completed while in 315Q or 325W). Whereas the first class in this series prepared students to propose a study and gather initial data, this second half of the Qualitative Research Methods series will take a deep dive into data analysis, validation strategies, and strategies for effectively writing up qualitative findings. The class will meet bi-weekly over the course of the semester.

PSYCH
315Z 3217 1 4   Comparative Evaluation Theory
TextbookTextbook
Wanda D. Casillas Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course will provide students with a basic understanding of: prevalent evaluation theories, systems for categorizing these theories, the process of theory development in evaluation, connections between evaluation theory and practice, research on evaluation, and some professional issues in evaluation.

PSYCH
319F 3194 1 2 M2 Organizational Justice
TextbookTextbook
Stephen Gilliland Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Harper 61 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Organizational justice is the study of perceptions of fairness in organizations. Research over the past 40 years has demonstrated that organizational justice predicts a wide variety of employee attitudes and behaviors. With a focus on advancing research and improving leader behavior, we examine theories and current directions in organizational justice around three questions: What does it mean to be fair? Why does it matter? And, why do so many leaders get it wrong?

PSYCH
323 3198 1 4   Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
TextbookTextbook
Michael Hogg Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Yuhaaviatam Center 108 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This advanced level core course in the social psychology program examines a broad range of topics in the social psychology of processes and phenomena that occur within and between social groups and categories. It focuses on both theory and empirical research and may include topics such as self and social identity, social exclusion, conformity and influence, group motivation and social dilemmas, group structure and decision making, protest and social change, conflict and cooperation between groups, and discrimination and prejudice. It pays to enroll early as a quota of 20 to 25 students may be imposed.

PSYCH
332 3212 1 4   Adolescent Development
TextbookTextbook
Kendall Bronk Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 24 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Designed to acquaint students with the major research and theories on adolescence, this course will explore the nature of adolescent development in terms of biological, cognitive, social, and emotional processes. With an emphasis on theory, students will learn to differentiate between myth and fact regarding adolescent development by critically examining research findings across disciplines. The course will begin with a general overview of the most influential theories of adolescent development. Next, attention will be focused on critically examining empirical findings supposedly supportive of the most renowned theories. Students will then be given the opportunity to explore theories from across disciplines with the goal of discovering new explanations of adolescent thought and behavior. At the end of the course, students will present and defend a theoretical rationale explaining behavior and thought indicative of adolescence.

PSYCH
342 3211 1 4   Science of Human Flourishing
TextbookTextbook
Saeideh Heshmati Mon 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 26 Hybrid-Flexible This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Hybrid-Flexible Instructional Mode Description: All synchronous instructional time occurs in-person and online simultaneously. Students can choose to attend synchronous sessions in-person or online. Course may include both synchronous and asynchronous instructional content. This course is designed to provide a powerful formative experience at the graduate level to engender a transdisciplinary dialogue around the complex phenomenon of human flourishing. Human flourishing is a multidimensional and universal human experience – an effort to achieve individual fulfillment within the context of a larger community. To understand this complex experience, a broader and wider dialogue is needed. By providing an interactive, reflective, and experiential atmosphere, this course aims to develop trusting relationships with peers and professors for a transdisciplinary dialogue around the concept of human flourishing. For each of the flourishing topics explored in the classroom, students will learn about the scientific research behind the topic and will form collaborative groups to discuss how different disciplines can contribute to the conceptualization of the matter. In groups, students will think critically about the current theories of well-being and flourishing and creatively develop an innovative way to define the flourishing concept and to brainstorm ways that their definition can be validly and reliably measured and tested.

PSYCH
350C 3196 1 4   Cognition
TextbookTextbook
Laura Johnson Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 26 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course is designed to provide an overview of scientific research in the field of Cognitive Psychology. Specific topics include perception, object recognition, attention, working memory, long-term memory, and memory systems. For perspective on human cognition and science in general, students will also discuss philosophical questions about the meaning of truth, reality, and objectivity. Several research approaches will be considered, including experimental psychology, individual differences/psychometrics, neuroscience, and development. Students will read chapters from the textbook and journal articles and engage in class discussions. Students will also be expected to choose a specific topic of interest relevant to the course and write a final paper that summarizes contemporary research on that topic in a way that clearly distinguishes things are currently known and things that remain unknown.

PSYCH
350H 3189 1 4   Organizational Culture
TextbookTextbook
Maria Gloria Gonzalez Morales Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course provides an overview of the methodological, epistemological, and problem-solving issues involved in the study of organizational culture. The course will examine the wide range of approaches to the study of organizational culture, the underlying assumptions of these competing approaches, and how these assumptions shape how culture is defined, developed, and changed. We will look at cultural artifacts such as language, metaphors, rites and ceremonies, stories and myths, symbols, dress, history, ways of doing things, buildings and heroes. Methodological approaches, including ethnographic and clinical perspectives, will be compared and contrasted. The course will also examine the role of leaders in shaping organizational culture, and special issues such as mergers and acquisitions, succession, and cultural deviance.

PSYCH
350KK 3206 1 4   Positive Organizational Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Stewart Donaldson Fri 2:00PM -
4:50PM
Online Class Online Class meets Friday 2-5 & Sat 9-11:50 on 1/20 & 1/21, 2/17 & 2/18, 3/17 & 3/18, 4/21 & 4/22 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Positive Organizational Psychology is the study of positive outcomes, processes, and attributes of organizations and their members. As the capstone of the Master’s program in Positive Organizational Psychology, this course will cover classic and contemporary perspectives in positive organizational psychology. In addition, emphasis will be given to organizational application and evidence-based interventions for improving employee well-being, learning, and performance. The course requires active participation and will culminate in an applied project designed by class members.

PSYCH
350PP 3199 1 2 M1 Positive Leadership
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Reichard Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 108 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. In this course, students will explore the topic of leadership through a positive psychological lens. Recent advances in theoretical and empirical research related to new-genre leadership theories including authentic leadership, strengths-based leadership, shared leadership, followership, and values-based leadership will be discussed.

PSYCH
350S 3193 1 4   Organizational Development & Change
TextbookTextbook
Stephen Gilliland Tue 2:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 108 Hybrid-Flexible This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via Canvas. Hybrid-Flexible Instructional Mode Description: All synchronous instructional time occurs in-person and online simultaneously. Students can choose to attend synchronous sessions in-person or online. Course may include both synchronous and asynchronous instructional content. This course covers the analysis of organizational change processes, including problem diagnosis, development of alternative interventions, change management, implementation of changes, and assessment of the effectiveness of changes. Emphasis is placed on methods for conducting research on change/development efforts in organizations, as well as on the practicalities of designing and implementing changes in diverse and dynamic organizational contexts.

PSYCH
350UR 3203 1 4   User Experience (UX) Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Green Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Online Instructor: Danielle Green Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. As a professional in the field of User Experience and Product Design, you will need to apply your skills in experimental design and data analysis while accounting for real-world constraints. UX Research Methods provides a comprehensive review of the entire research “toolkit” you will need to answer the full breadth of strategic and tactical research questions you will encounter. The focus for this methods course is to expose you to the kinds of constraints and datasets you will find when designing digital & omnichannel user experiences.You will be guided through the process of applying your foundational knowledge in experimental design and statistics to real-world user experience case studies. Assignments will focus on practical situations with sample datasets that are representative of what you will find in applied settings.

PSYCH
350V 3313 1 4   Intervention Development
TextbookTextbook
Eusebio Alvaro Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Yuhaaviatam Center 108 In-Person The course meets two times a week roughly every other week - Monday & Wednesday: 1/23, 1/25, 2/6, 2/8, 2/20, 2/22, 3/6, 3/8, 4/3, 4/5, 4/17, 4/19, 5/1, 5/3 In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course presents an overview of various health behaviors that can be potentially targeted for change and reviews approaches to intervention and program development to so as to change targeted behaviors. There will be a focus on the identification of behavioral determinants-with a special aim of differentiating those that are structural/biological vs. those that are amenable to change. Classic studies that address changing health behaviors in both the public health and clinical medical context will be reviewed. Examples of the former include tobacco prevention, and HIV/AIDS prevention, while examples of the latter include promoting breast cancer screening and compliance with medical regimens. It is expected that, at the end of this course, students will be able to identify behaviors amenable to change and to design programs targeting such behaviors.

PSYCH
354P 3210 1 4   Positive and Inclusive Education
TextbookTextbook
Saeideh Heshmati Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 35 Hybrid-Flexible This course has a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Hybrid-Flexible Instructional Mode Description: All synchronous instructional time occurs in-person and online simultaneously. Students can choose to attend synchronous sessions in-person or online. Course may include both synchronous and asynchronous instructional content. Positive and inclusive education is the teaching of scientifically validated programs from positive psychology, diversity and inclusion research, and education that have an impact on student and staff well-being. This course outlines what positive and inclusive education entails, why schools should adopt well-being for all as an operational goal, and how they can become a positive and inclusive institution. We will explore (1) the current state of education in terms of diversity, inclusivity, and the well-being of stakeholders (2) measures important in evaluating an inclusive and positive educational system, (3) taking a systems perspective for diversity, inclusivity, and positivity in education to build well-being and resilience, and (4) the state of positive and inclusive education across the globe. As a final project, students will develop a systematic change plan for an educational setting of interest to propose an action plan towards creating an inclusive and positive institution. Moreover, through interactive sessions and assignments students will also have the chance to begin brainstorming and applying the latest science and practices in DEI science and positive psychology in educational settings.

PSYCH
354Q 3218 1 2   Culturally Responsive Evaluation
TextbookTextbook
Wanda D. Casillas Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Culturally Responsive Evaluation is a way of thinking, a stance taken, and an approach to evaluation that centers culture and context in all steps of an evaluation from planning to utilization of findings. Married with tools for analyzing and attending to social and organizational systems, this course provides a timely and necessary foundation for critically informing sound evaluation practice while uplifting the role of evaluation in supporting social impact, social change, and advocacy. In this course, Systems Approaches to Culturally Responsive Evaluation (SysCRE), we will review foundations of Systems and CRE theory and practice; discuss appropriate methodological practices for designing engagements and collecting data; and learn about analysis and interpretation of mixed methods data under equity-focused evaluation frameworks. Taking the broad approach that “culture” describes a shared set of values, principles, practices, behaviors, and tools among groups of individuals, we’ll determine the ways in which programs and evaluations are culturally- and contextually-situated and explore what this assertion means for evaluation design, methods, and analysis. We will draw from interdisciplinary readings across health, education, evaluation, and other fields to confront complex topics such as how the intersectionality of evaluators and stakeholders can impact the success of a program or evaluation; challenge traditional social science assertions of objectivity and bias; and revisit ideas about data validity from an equity lens. The course is divided into three components: (1) Foundations in SysCRE theory and principles - where we will engage with texts from thought leaders such as Bob Williams, Bill Trochim, Karen Kirkhart, Rodney Hopson and others to establish a basis for thinking about culturally-situated social systems. (2) Mixed-methods approaches and data collection tactics – where we will compare traditional social science research and evaluation paradigms with the rising tide of responsive data collection methods; and (3) Analysis, interpretation, and utilization of data in equity-focused frameworks – where we will challenge long-held perspectives that data outliers are “noise” and that disaggregation of data by demographic factors is sufficient for an equity analysis while learning about alternative strategies for working with qualitative and quantitative data.

PSYCH
400M 3215 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
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Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Independent Studies Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

PSYCH
413 3202 1 2   Social Identity: Theory and Research Practicum
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Michael Hogg Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 108 In-Person The Course meets on specific Class Dates: Jan 20 ,Feb 3, Feb 17 ,March 3 ,March 24 ,April 14 & April 28 This class has an irregular meeting pattern. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This social psychology course focuses on social identity theory, broadly defined. It examines its cognitive, motivational and social interactive dimensions, and studies a wide array of social identity and social identity-related processes and phenomena within and between small groups and large social categories. Students will engage with conceptual issues to advance theory, and will be involved in designing, operationalizing and conducting empirical research, and writing-up research for publication and conference presentation. The course is intended for social PhDs but also open to social MA and other psychology PhDs. Students wishing to enroll should obtain permission from Professor Hogg.

PSYCH
414 3208 1 2   Evaluation Procedures Practicum
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Tiffany Berry, Michelle Sloper Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
McManus 33 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Evaluation Practicum is designed to help students implement the evaluation proposals they in Evaluation Procedures. This course is intended to be an applied class that extends students' learning from the classroom into actual organizations. Using the evaluation proposal from Evaluation Procedures, this course will facilitate students' implementation of their evaluation proposals. We will focus on measures/methods, how to collect data within an organizational context efficiently and accurately, analyzing data for an applied audience, and writing a user-friendly report that sufficiently answers stakeholders' key evaluation questions.

PSYCH
450 3204 1 0 - 4   Field Placement
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Stewart Donaldson Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Online The course will meet 1/27, 2/24, 4/7, 4/28 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. A field placement is a working internship in an organization relevant to students' professional training in psychology. A field placement is usually arranged with the help of each student's faculty advisor as well as with aid from the Research Institute in the department. Four semester units is the minimum for which a student should enroll (425 and 450 combined). If appropriate, the placement may be for a greater number of units and may extend beyond one semester. Simultaneous participation in Psychology 425 (Field Placement Seminar) is required. All students are required to take this course OR Psychology 310 (Supervised Teaching Seminar) during their first three years of enrollment.

PSYCH
499 3214 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
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Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Independent Studies Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

RELIGION
301 3280 1 4   Contemporary Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion
TextbookTextbook
Kevin Wolfe Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Harper 2 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course poses the basic questions: What is Religion? How to study Religion? It aims to introduce you to current theoretical approaches in the study of Religion/religion as represented in selected thinkers from anthropology, sociology, psychology, philosophy of religion, women's studies, lived religion and/or scriptural studies. Also, you will attain a working knowledge of some methods used in the contemporary study of religion including, for instance, the historical method, ethnography and textual hermeneutics/criticism. In addition, this seminar shall highlight contemporary theories and methods essential in and to the department’s major areas of study. Hence, this course strives to feature regular guest appearances by the Department of Religion’s faculty with corresponding assigned readings.

RELIGION
302HC 3281 1 4   History of Christianity II: Reformation to Present
TextbookTextbook
Daniel Ramirez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Harper 61 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. A history of Christianity from the Reformation to the present which focuses on the worldwide expansion of Christianity in the modern era and the diversity of forms which Christian faith and practice have taken in different time periods and cultural contexts. Extensive use will be made of primary sources as means of illuminating historical and historiographical.

RELIGION
311 3282 1 4   Women and Witchcraft
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Nicola Denzey Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Online Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Women and Witchcraft: Why have these two been so consistently associated over the centuries? We’ll examine Latin literature featuring witches including Apuleius’ satirical novel The Golden Ass, Graeco-Roman and Graeco-Egyptian magic spells and magic handbooks, the inquisitorial handbook Malleus Maleficarum (“the “Witches’ Hammer”) designed as a guide to interrogating women suspected of witchcraft, Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, even selections from the Harry Potter series – and read these in conjunction with studies from historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives. Course may be of interest to AWS/WGS students.

RELIGION
340 3283 1 4   Mormonism and Other New Religions in America
TextbookTextbook
Matthew B. Bowman Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 35 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class considers the phenomenon of American new religious movements, and asks questions such as: What has inspired the formation of new religious movements in the United States? Why do some such movements fail and others flourish? How do such movements seek or spurn legitimacy? Though the course's primary focus will be on the various churches that make up the Mormon tradition, we will regularly examine other such movements-from the nineteenth century Oneida Community to contemporary movements like Scientology-as well, in order study the phenomenon in question comparatively and in an interdisciplinary way.

RELIGION
400M 3347 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Independent Studies Independent Study Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for independent research with instructor guidance. Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

RELIGION
455 3284 1 4   Women in the Book of Judges
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Tammi Schneider Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
IAC Library In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course will begin with a close reading of the Biblical text concerning the different women in the Book of Judges. Each student will be responsible for one of the women in the book, investigating how the secondary literature (from the New Testament to modern times) treats this character.

RELIGION
465IS 3285 1 4   Classical Arabic Literature and the Qur'an
TextbookTextbook
Ruqayya Khan Thu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Yuhaaviatam Center 108 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Without situating it in its early cultural and literary contexts, it is difficult to comprehend and examine the Qur'an. This course will treat the Qur’an not just as a canonical scripture, but as the document of a communication process. The oral character of the text and its inter-textual relation with ancient Arabic Poetry on the one hand, and with Biblical and post-Biblical traditions, on the other hand, will be highlighted.More broadly, thiscourse is designed to explore the intersections between classical Arab-Islamic literatures (in translation) and the Qur’an. Diverse methods (from disciplines and fields such as Anthropology, Linguistics, Semiotics and Performance Studies) are examined in order to gain insights into modes of orality, semi-orality and writing (e.g., poetry, sermon, epistle, biblical literatures) to study both the pre-canonical and early canonical history of the Qur’an. It is possible that Islamic civilizational texts from non-Arabic traditions (e.g., Persian or Urdu) are integrated into the course.

RELIGION
478 3286 1 4   The Museum and the Bible
TextbookTextbook
Tammi Schneider Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
IAC Library In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course will focus on how the Bible (in this case New and Old) has appeared in Museums. We will begin by examining the different "types" of museums that exist, what constitutes the "bible" for a museum, and different approaches that Museums have taken in "presenting" the Bible from art through Dead Sea Scrolls. Format to include mix of critical discussion, presentations and responses.

RELIGION
499 3348 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Independent Studies Independent Study Instructional Mode Description: No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for independent research with instructor guidance. Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

SP&E
351 3186 1 4   Comparative Political Institutions
TextbookTextbook
Melissa Rogers Mon 2:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 33 Hybrid Course will have a weekly asynchronous component. Students will be notified via canvas. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. The study of political institutions dominates the field of comparative politics. In this course, we will examine both the validity and foundations of the study of political institutions as well as look in-depth at the institutions of modern government. This course is a core requirement for the comparative politics concentration. It provides foundational concepts and methods of analysis necessary for the regional and elective comparative politics courses. Moreover, this class is a useful elective course for concentrations in American politics and International Relations. American political institutions are used as a basis for understanding the functioning of institutions in other countries. Accordingly, students learn about American institutions and the effect of those institutions that is not visible outside of a comparative perspective. In international relations, the domestic politics of the world’s governments are crucial to understanding how they behave in the international arena. This course provides a strong foundation for analyzing the behavior and motivations of governments. Specifically, this course examines the diversity and causal effects of the institutions of democracy across the world. These include executives, legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, electoral rules, and party systems. The methods of analysis are diverse; we examine cross-national statistical research, case studies, formal models, and more. Students also learn the broad concepts of institutions and institutional analysis that can be applied across the wide variety of democracies and autocracies alike.

SP&E
353 3182 1 4   Comparative Political Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Tanu Kumar Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
McNassor Room (Harper 53) In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. How do citizens participate in democratic political systems in which the average citizen is very low-income and/or government institutions are resource-constrained? This course will cover patterns of voting, protest, violence, social media use, and civic participation in such contexts, with examples drawn primarily from countries in South Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

SP&E
359 3183 1 4   Economic Development: Household and Local Development Issues
TextbookTextbook
Tanu Kumar Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 33 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. What are the barriers to economic growth, and what might lower them? This class reviews cutting edge research on these questions in low- and middle-income countries. The first part of focuses on household-level barriers to growth and the second part considers community, market, or regional-level constraints. There is an emphasis on empirical readings, with studies drawn mainly from South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America. By the end of the course, students will be able to: 1) Identify the major barriers to wealth accumulation faced by households and firms in low- and middle-income countries; 2) Learn how to critically read cutting edge research on political behavior in developing countries; 3) Synthesize and evaluate some of the most common or promising policy solutions to lowering these barriers; 4) Identify an open area of inquiry in development economics, pose a research question related to this area, and develop a research design to begin investigating potential answers.

SP&E
359B 3356 1 2   International Development: Finance and Institutions
TextbookTextbook
Graham Bird Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Online The course will meet biweekly from 9 -11:50 AM on the following days: 1/23; 2/6; 2/20; 3/6; 3/20; 4/10; 4/24; 5/8 Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course covers key issues associated with international development. A distinction will be drawn between emerging economies and low income countries and this means that important regional differences will also be taken into account. After briefly discussing domestic financial systems and domestic saving, the causes of balance of payments problems and the design of balance of payments policy, with a particular focus on exchange rate policy, the course will concentrate on examining the sources of external finance for emerging and developing economies, including private capital flows, foreign aid, and migrants’ remittances. It will also examine the role of the international financial institutions in encouraging development, focusing in particular on the International Monetary Fund. Finally, the course analyses the problem of external debt as it faces low income counties. The course is analytically rigorous but not highly technical. However, an academic background that enables students to understand and critically assess contemporary leading edge research will be required.

SP&E
487 3342 1 4   Visualizing Data
TextbookTextbook
Tyler T. Reny Wed 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 108 Hybrid Blended This course is hybrid as defined this semester. Will receive information regarding asynchronous activities via Canvas. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Visual displays of data and models are an integral part of most social science presentations and can make or break a paper or presentation. Good visuals help researchers uncover patterns and relationships they would otherwise miss. Sophisticated statistical models cry out for clear, easy-to-understand visual representations of model findings. Yet social scientists seldom put as much care into designing visual displays as they devote to causal identification, running statistical models, or crafting effective prose. This course takes the design of graphics and tables seriously and explores a variety of visual techniques for investigating patterns in data, summarizing statistical results, and efficiently representing the robustness of such results to alternative modeling assumptions. Emphasis is placed on the principles of effective visualization, examples from the social sciences, novel visual displays, and the implementation of recommended techniques using the R statistical environment and the R package ggplot2. There are no specific prerequisite courses but some familiarity with the basics of research design and quantitative inference (linear regression & elementary maximum likelihood) and the R programming language is required.

TNDY
336 3069 1 4   Analysis of Social Networks
TextbookTextbook
Wallace Chipidza Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 108 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course explores the defining characteristics of social networks, how they form and evolve over time, and ultimately how they influence various outcomes of interest. We utilize a variety of quantitative techniques (e.g. social network analysis and exponential random graph modeling) to understand the structure, formation, and evolution of social networks. Students learn how to effectively visualize social networks of varying size, from small to very large. Students also learn statistical and machine learning techniques to understand how individuals influence each other’s behaviors and attitudes in these networks.

TNDY
404O 3070 1 4   Collaboration Across the Public-Private Divide
TextbookTextbook
Robert Klitgaard Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Online This course will have one (1) hour of async per week Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course explores how to design, lead, and manage public-private partnerships. We examine theoretical approaches from many disciplines, as well as experience from around the world, to analyze various forms of collaboration among governments, businesses, and citizens. We consider the practical challenges of making such partnerships work, using outstanding case studies. Along the way, we reconsider the meaning and practice of public policy and management. Examples are drawn from public health, education, international development, urban renewal, infrastructure, minimum-wage reforms, anti-corruption initiatives, and more.

TNDY
407V 3068 1 4   Urban Studies
TextbookTextbook
Heather Campbell Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McNassor Room (Harper 53) In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Cities represent about 2% of the world’s area, 50% of the world’s population, 75% of the world’s energy consumption, 80% of the worlds carbon emissions. This class will ground students in an understanding of: the development of cities, aspects of the contemporary city, basic understanding of systems thinking and the urban system, how cities are believed to grow (or not), and how we might measure the complex known as “cities.” Once we have those foundations, we will turn to a variety of topical urban policy issues, including environmental justice, public safety, public health, housing, etc., and how recent research addresses such urban policy issues. Studying cities is inherently transdisciplinary since the city is a complex system of systems—the economic system, the governmental system, the transportation system, the environmental system, the social system, the public health system.

TNDY
408E 3072 1 4   Mechanisms That Rule Our Social Universe
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Tasoff TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
Pomona, Carnegie Bldg-214 In-Person This is a joint course at Pomona College. In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Billions of years ago, chemicals formed on planet Earth that could replicate themselves. These were the progenitors of life. Over eons of evolution, autonomous living agents predated, cooperated, and competed with each other to eventually create the modern world of today. Across that history, there have been several recurring themes on how agents interact. In the course we will study fundamental forces that drive sociality at multiple levels, from viruses to markets. We will uncover some of the hidden mechanisms that rule our social universe. For example, we will discover why genes form chromosomes, why people form nations, and why the reasons for the two are similar. The emphasis will be on a few key ideas that have broad and profound application. In our journey, we will learn from where social systems evolved and perhaps to where social systems may be evolving. This course is intended for students who are interested in having their perspective shifted through provocative frameworks (colloquially referred to as "blowing your mind"). Additional time will be devoted to professional self-examination and prioritization (colloquially referred to as "what the heck am I doing with my life?").

TNDY
408T 3071 1 4   Religion, Music and Culture in the Americas
TextbookTextbook
Daniel Ramirez Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Harper 1 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. [These young Aztecs] sing the ancient songs they were wont to sing in the days of their idolatry–not all of them but many of them. And no one understands what they say as their songs are very obscure. And if, after their conversion here, they sing some songs they have composed which deal with the things of God and His saints, they are enveloped in many errors and heresies. These introductory remarks to Bernardino Sahagún’s magnum opus, Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España (1579-1580), illumine the motives behind his creation of an orthodox Nahuatl-language liturgy in 1583, Psalmodía Cristiana, and the imprimatur of his project by the Third Provincial Council (1585) of the bishops of New Spain. The Franciscan friar’s concern over heterodox subterfuge in the musical and cultural spheres speaks to the centrality of these in religious history and experience and their potential to undermine, extend, preserve and change these. This course will assay a transdisciplinary exploration of the imbricated spheres of religion, music, and culture. Our principal approach will borrow from the transdiscipline of ethnomusicology to query the role of music in the social religious settings. After a theoretical grounding in cultural practice, we will study ethnomusicological case studies from the south Pacific, South Africa, and the Tejano borderlands. These will provide helpful comparative frames for our exploration of the question of musical and sonic spheres in: Mesoamerican Catholic contexts of evangelization and hybridity; transatlantic (including Caribbean) networks of Anglo-American Protestantism and African American Gospel; ethnic immigrant religious networks (Dutch Reform/German Lutheran and Methodist); heterodox traditions (Latter-Day Saints and Seventh-Day Adventists); old and new borderlands musics (from Penitentes to Pentecostals), and contemporary global Christian musics. We will also avail ourselves of musical and sonic archives from the Smithsonian Institution, Library of Congress, and several university-based collections, as we propose to approach (regional) religious communities/congregations in the capture, archiving, and interpretation of their religious cultural musical practice. This course will help students achieve the following learning outcomes: 1) Familiarity with major debates and research projects at the intersection of ethnomusicology and religious studies (both represent interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary fields); 2) Critical reflection on the limits of traditional text-centric uni-disciplinary approaches and the opportunities presented by extra-textual transdisciplinary approaches; 3) Engagement with and competency in the fields of ethnomusicology and religious studies through written work, oral presentation, and in-class presentation; 4) Assay initial explorations into musical and sonic archival research and community engagement over these (keeping in mind ethical insights derived from 1), 2) and 3); 5) Preparation for dissertation proposal projects (if so inclined) 6) Sharpening of skills in critical reading, writing, thinking, and speaking.

TNDY
408U 3352 1 4   Data Privacy Through a Global Legal Lens
TextbookTextbook
Maria Sanford TueThu 6:00PM -
7:30PM
Online Class Online Non standard meeting day and time Tuesday/Thursday 6:00 – 7:30PM. Meets every week for the full-term. Online Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The practice of cybersecurity and data privacy laws continues to develop and mature as executive-level managers, corporate counsel, and corporate boards struggle to become familiar with the subject matter. Gain a broad understanding of the breadth and importance of the privacy field and its impact on U.S. businesses. This course focuses on the evolution of privacy (i.e., encryption explosion, bulk data retention, electronic gag orders), as well as the privacy issues related to government surveillance and national security. This course also summarizes the essential provisions (and new developments) of key US state privacy laws, and several major foreign privacy laws such as the EU's GDPR, China's PIPL, Brazil's LGPD, and more.

WGS
301 3287 1 4   Introduction to Women's & Gender Studies
TextbookTextbook
Candida Jaquez Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McManus 31 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This course is a highly theoretical introduction to some of the key historical and current theoretical concepts in women and gender studies from transnational and interdisciplinary perspectives as informed by diverse communities. Feminists in globalized economies located around the world are challenged to think and organize transnationally. To meet this challenge, one needs a nuanced approach to the construction of one’s own identity (including its internal contradictions, multiplicities, and instabilities) and a facility with concepts by which to think about difference, language, politics, and activism. This course counts towards the Women and Gender Studies certificate.

WGS
304 3288 1 4   Feminist Research Methods and Inquiry
TextbookTextbook
Dionne Bensonsmith Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 31 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. An examination feminist methods and theoretical approaches to research and analysis.? Participants will focus on debates within and about feminist methodology, for example, feminist theorizing of experience, feminist and women of color epistemologies, and situated knowledge.? Participants will explore theorizing across disciplines and cultural contexts, focusing on both methodology (theories of the research process) and epistemology (theories of knowledge).? We will survey a range of feminist research methods and their applications across disciplines and areas, and address contemporary methodologies employed by scholars doing research in?and?with communities of color and/or marginalized communities. Topics may include trauma-informed research methods, storywork and narrative methods, decolonial, intersectional, queer, and critical race methodologies.

WGS
323 3290 1 4   Disability and Gender: Foundational Theories and Activism
TextbookTextbook
Carl D Schottmiller Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McManus 35 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Disability Studies offers a lens of analysis to (re)conceptualize the body, society, and culture. The goal of this emerging interdisciplinary field is to create a critical framework that questions and connects our understandings of “disability” and impairment across established disciplines. This course will provide a sampling of disciplinary perspectives on “disability,” with a focus on disability in conversation with gender and sexuality. Students will be introduced to perspectives on disability and its relationship to gender and sexuality through an intersectional lens, both through the academic field of Disability Studies and the Disability Justice movement. The course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Disability Studies. Topics will include the history and foundational intersectional theories of Feminist and Queer Disability Studies; the social construction, historically and in the present, of gender and disability; relationships between Disability Studies and the Disability Justice movement; and Disability Studies methodologies for research, practice, and pedagogy.

WGS
381 3289 1 4   Building Global Bridges: Antiracist and Transnational Feminist Activisms.
TextbookTextbook
Piya Chatterjee Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 35 In-Person In-Person Instructional Mode Description: All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class will draw connections between U.S. based feminist work that has always been connected to international social movements in the global South--especially during the time that "Third World feminisms" was very important for U.S. women of color activists involved in the Civil Rights and anti-War movements. After we look at these historical linkages, we will pivot to looking at the contemporary organizing work being done by diverse feminists in the global South--within their specific histories, but also in ways that they are connected to a wider transnational and global conversation about women and gender justice. A particular focus will be around women and gender justice struggles within war, and in conflict zones. A praxis oriented project (building off of student interests) will run parallel to these political and scholarly critiques. Specific regional/national focus will include: Dalit and Muslim feminist critiques in India; resistance and survival in the Democratic Republic of Congo; and Indigenous women's histories and organizing in Central America and Chiapas.

WRITING
350 3090 1 0   Dissertation and Thesis Writing
TextbookTextbook
Marcus S Weakley Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 12 Hybrid-Flexible This course is designed for students at the writing stage of a thesis, dissertation proposal, or dissertation. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course is designed with a two-fold purpose: to cover major topics on the writing process and structures related to theses and dissertations, and to provide structured writing time, accountability, and feedback. Adapting the format of the Center for Writing & Rhetoric's dissertation boot camps into a course, each week will include an examination of a relevant writing topic as well as dedicated writing time. The course aims to increase writer productivity by developing individualized writing plans and habits in conjunction with community-based, structured writing time and instruction on applicable writing topics. Students must be in the writing phase for a thesis, dissertation proposal, or dissertation to take the course. Please contact the instructor with any questions.

WRITING
350 3091 2 0   Dissertation and Thesis Writing
TextbookTextbook
Arline Votruba Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 12 Hybrid-Flexible This course is designed for students at the writing stage of a thesis, dissertation proposal, or dissertation. Hybrid Instructional Mode Description: Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. This course is designed with a two-fold purpose: to cover major topics on the writing process and structures related to theses and dissertations, and to provide structured writing time, accountability, and feedback. Adapting the format of the Center for Writing & Rhetoric's dissertation boot camps into a course, each week will include an examination of a relevant writing topic as well as dedicated writing time. The course aims to increase writer productivity by developing individualized writing plans and habits in conjunction with community-based, structured writing time and instruction on applicable writing topics. Students must be in the writing phase for a thesis, dissertation proposal, or dissertation to take the course. Please contact the instructor with any questions.