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2024 Summer - *ALL
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Subj Cat# Class# Sect Units Mod Course Faculty Day Time Location Instruction Mode Note Description

CAFE
530 5060 1 2 M2 Inclusive Excellence Pathways to the College Teaching Certificate
TextbookTextbook
Lizbeth Bayardo Cardenas Mon 7:00PM -
8:50PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Prerequisite: Completed TNDY 430 or PFF 530 This class structures your progress through the teaching practicum and completion of all the teaching portfolio items for the Inclusive Excellence in College Teaching Certificate. In this course, you will apply the principles and frameworks from first into practice. The class focuses on coaching and a structured assignment submission and feedback process. Using the work that you began in the first course, you will complete your sample course design and syllabus. In addition, you will develop a sample learning management system course and a teacher-scholar website. The course culminates in a final integrated reflection of your entire journey toward becoming an inclusive, future-focused educator.

CAFE
540 5085 1 2 M1 Professional Practice Pathways
TextbookTextbook
Maria Gloria Gonzalez Morales Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. No meetings June 4, 11, & 18. This class structures your progress through the professional practicum and completion of all the professional portfolio items for the Inclusive Excellence in Professional Practice?Certificate. In this course, you will apply the principles and frameworks from TNDY 440 into practice. The class focuses on coaching and a structured assignment submission and feedback process. Using the work that you began in the first course, you will complete your diversity statement and changemaker project. In addition, you will develop a community engagement plan. The course culminates in a final integrated reflection of your entire journey toward becoming an equity-minded and social justice-focused changemaker in your professional practice.

CGH
300 5121 2 4   Theoretical Foundations in Health Promotion & Education
TextbookTextbook
Salome Kapella Mshigeni  -
Online Class Session Online This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the theoretical issues and current methodologies related to understanding and influencing health behavior change in diverse populations. The course will focus on the social and behavioral determinants of health on the individual, interpersonal, community, institutional and policy levels. The course features guest appearances by representatives from community-based organizations who relate course material to current challenges in public health practice.

CGH
301 5077 1 4 M2 Biostatistics
TextbookTextbook
Daniel John Woytowich  -
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Asynchronous class. Department permission required. Students are trained in the most commonly used statistical methods in clinical and experimental research. Students learn to select the most appropriate data analytic methods; how to apply these methods to actual data; and how to read and interpret computer output from commonly used statistical packages. In addition, the students learn to read, critique and interpret statistical concepts in the health science literature.

CGH
302 5122 2 4   Epidemiology
TextbookTextbook
Rachaline Elizabeth Napier  -
Online Class Session Online This course provides an overview of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations. Students are provided with the skills and knowledge to investigate the epidemiology of a specific disease or other health-related phenomenon and to critically evaluate population-based research studies designed to test health-related hypotheses

CGH
303 5078 1 4 M2 Health Services in the US & Abroad
TextbookTextbook
Robert Avina  -
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Asynchronous class. This course examines the health care delivery system to understand contemporary issues affecting the health of the American and International public and the institutions that provide health services and protect health. The course includes the historical development of various health care systems, determinants of health and health care utilization, the role of health care providers, health policy and politics, health care financing, public health, and the interactions of various components of the systems. The class emphasizes how institutions within the health care delivery system affect public health including planning, organization, administration, evaluation and policy analysis.

CGH
304 5079 1 4 M2 Environmental & Occupational Health
TextbookTextbook
Stephanie Lino  -
No Room Needed Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Asynchronous class. This course provides a broad overview of the field of environmental and occupational health, developing a public health approach to understanding and preventing disease and disability. Students apply the principles of the biological impact pathway and environmental epidemiology to environmental and occupational health issues. Students analyze the exposure-disease continuums and disease prevention. Emphasis is placed on learning and using concepts related to the sources and behavioral determinants of exposure, the social behavioral, Physiological and genetic basis of sensitivity, and dose-response relationships.

CGH
305 5075 1 4 M1 Seminar in Grant Writing & Proposal Development
TextbookTextbook
Bree Hemingway  -
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Asynchronous The goal of this course is to provide students completing their field training an opportunity to enhance their skills in the area of grant writing and reviewing. The student will learn the steps in planning and writing the grant, understanding the funding environment, learning how to choose different types of grants, and understand the submission and review process. CGH students only; all other students by faculty permission.

CGH
306 5004 1 0 - 4   Supervised Field Training in Public Health
TextbookTextbook
Jamie Felicitas-Perkins  -
No Room Needed Supervision No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. MPH students are required by the Council on Education for Public Health, the accrediting body for public health schools and programs, to demonstrate competency attainment through an Applied Practice Experience (APE). The goal of the APE is to enrich students’ educational training in public health by providing an opportunity to apply theory and skills acquired from their concentration to community-based research and service in a practice setting. Students contribute to an agency’s resources and to the solution of public health problems while developing personal confidence and leadership as a public health professional.

CGH
307 5005 1 0 - 2   Public Health Capstone
TextbookTextbook
Cindy Delgado  -
No Room Needed Supervision No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. The Council on Education in Public Health (CEPH) requires all its accredited schools and programs to assure that “MPH students complete an integrative learning experience (ILE) that demonstrates synthesis of [public health] foundational and concentration competencies.” In keeping with the criteria set forth by our accrediting body, the main purpose of the Capstone course is to provide the culminating, ILE for students enrolled in Claremont Graduate University’s Master of Public Health Program during their last semester prior to graduation. The course will draw upon students 'prior training in the five core areas of public health (i.e., Social and Behavioral Science, Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Health Services, and Environmental and Occupational Health), their additional required coursework in their specified concentration, and their real-world experience gained in the field during and prior to graduation. The Capstone course will provide an opportunity for students to synthesize academic training with public health practice in career preparation of their choice. Products created in this course should help students build a tailored career professional portfolio to present to future employers and job opportunities in the public health workforce. The course further provides an opportunity for students to foster and fortify their understanding of not only the role of public health but also their own individual role, accomplishments, and contributions as public health professionals in the improvement of the health and well-being of populations in the United States and abroad.

CGH
308 5012 1 4 M1 Foundations in Program Planning
TextbookTextbook
Kevin Meconis  -
Online Class Session Online Instructor: Kevin Meconis All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course introduces the core concepts, values, and methods of public health program planning and evaluation. Students develop skills for assessing community needs for health promotion; preparing written measurable health promotion program objectives with associated methods for achieving those objectives; designing health promotion program action plans that include implementation schemes; and evaluation strategies for measuring health program process, impact, and outcome effectiveness. Students apply their knowledge of health promotion theories to effectively to plan, implement, and evaluate health promotion and communication programs.

CGH
309 5011 1 4 M2 Monitoring & Evaluation of Global Public Health Programs
TextbookTextbook
Brandon Eugene Jacobs  -
Online Class Session Online Instructor: Brandon Jacobs All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course introduces students to the language and theory of program evaluation to undertake their own evaluation, including how to pose evaluation research questions, data collection methodologies and appropriate methods for various evaluation objectives, and various evaluation designs.

CGH
310 5010 1 4 M2 Foundations of Global Health: A Transdisciplinary Approach
TextbookTextbook
Fred Dominguez  -
Online Class Session Online Instructor: Fred Dominguez All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to understanding key public health challenges that transcend local and national boundaries and require collaborative solutions. Threats to the health security and well being of communities in the U.S. and abroad are extensive ranging from natural and technical disasters to environmental degradation, poverty and health disparities, and emerging and non-communicable disease. Topics that impact health outcomes, including globalization and climate change, over- and under nutrition, substance use, accidents and injuries, disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies, poor reproductive and maternal child health practices, and cultural influences will be addressed from a multi-sectoral perspective. Innovative solutions to public health problems, including use of technology, micro credit, public-private collaboration, and community and grassroots activities will be highlighted. The course will utilize interactive, participatory learning methods, including in-depth cases studies, class debates, and a field study project to provide maximum opportunity to develop problem-solving strategies for public health application.

CGH
311 5123 2 4   Curriculum & Materials Development
TextbookTextbook
Andrea Michelle Brace  -
Online Class Session Online This course provides an opportunity for students to explore curriculum writing and training skills applied to public health needs and settings. Students will explore learning theories, assessment of learning needs, curriculum and training design, conduct and evaluation. Faculty will present examples of curriculum concerning tobacco, alcohol, drugs, physical activity and HIV prevention. The course will include a review of health communications theories, assessment of audiences and their needs, and principles of message design for diverse audiences.

CGH
400M 5138 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Independent Studies Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

CGH
405 5003 1 4 M1 Seminar in Grant Writing & Proposal Development (Doctoral)
TextbookTextbook
Bree Hemingway  -
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Asynchronous The goal of this course is to provide students completing their field training an opportunity to enhance their skills in the area of grant writing and reviewing. The student will learn the steps in planning and writing the grant, understanding the funding environment, learning how to choose different types of grants, and understand the submission and review process. Course can be taken for either 2 or 4 units. CGH students only; all other students by faculty permission.

CGH
406 5088 1 0   Advanced Practicum in Public Health
TextbookTextbook
Jamie Felicitas-Perkins  -
TBA Supervision No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. The goal of the advanced doctoral practicum in public health is to provide an opportunity for doctoral students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills, knowledge and training acquired through courses of study to a high-level planned, approved, supervised and evaluated practice experience. During the practicum, students will gain professional experience through collaborating with practitioners, developing leadership competencies and contributing to the field of public health. Through their placement within an external organization, students are responsible or the completion of at least one significant project that is meaningful for the organization and to advanced public health practice.

CGH
489E 5084 2 0 M2 Interprofessional Practice Co-Curricular Requirement
TextbookTextbook
Jamie Felicitas-Perkins  -
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The Council on Education for Public Health requires MPH and DrPH students to meet one foundational competency related to interprofessional education. To meet these competencies, students are required to complete the Interprofessional Education Co-curricular Requirement, an experience designed to provide students with an opportunity to collaborate on interprofessional teams to improve public health.

CGH
499 5116 1 0   Doctoral Study (DrPH and PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Independent Studies No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for independent research with instructor guidance. Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

CLST
436 5086 1 4 M2 Feeling Natural?: Affect and Psychoanalysis in Contemporary Environmental Cultural Studies
TextbookTextbook
David K Seitz TueThu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. A 2021 poll conducted by the American Psychiatric Association found that two in three American adults described feeling anxious about the impact of climate change on life on Earth. Contemporary environmental politics are nothing if not emotional. But psychoanalysis and affect theory also gently remind us that emotions - particularly emotions that arise in the face of socially induced catastrophe - are in many respects trained and historical rather than simply "natural." At stake in this course is not dismissal of legitimate contemporary feelings of climate anxiety and grief, but a turn to psychoanalysis and affect theory to think structurally and historically about how those feelings come to be, and about the complex relationships between feeling differently and prospects for environmental justice.

ECON
351 5018 1 4 M1 Contemporary Issues in International Finance and Economic Development
TextbookTextbook
Graham Bird MonWed 10:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Session Online This course will meet twice a week on Mondays and Wednesdays. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is required for both the international economics and development policy field and the international money and finance field and builds on the material covered in Econ 350 Global Money and Finance. It provides a useful precursor to the preparation of doctoral proposals. However, it will be of interest to anyone who wants to learn more about important contemporary global financial issues. Amongst other things, the course covers: currency crises and financial contagion, monetary integration and disintegration, the choice of exchange rate regimes, currency wars, international capital flows and their volatility, the operations of the IMF, foreign aid, remittances and foreign direct investment, international debt, global macroeconomic imbalances, international reserves, international macroeconomic policy coordination, and the international financial ramifications of the COVID 19 pandemic. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on using theoretical and empirical analysis to better understand the issues covered, but the course also examines the way in which political factors exert an important influence over the design of policy in international money, finance and development. By investigating selected topics in depth, and by being exposed to the extant research literature, students develop their ability to assimilate, discuss and criticize published leading-edge research.

ECON
499 5115 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EDUC
PC126B 5090 1 1 M1 Foundations of Language & Culture Seminar
TextbookTextbook
Stanley Rodriguez Wed 8:00AM -
5:00PM
To Be Determined In-Person All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This class will provide a foundational understanding of language and culture in a series that will provide a credential pathway for Indigenous culture carriers.

EDUC
PCU116 5046 1 1 M2 Prof Development: Introduction to Supporting Novice Critical Social Justice Teachers
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 9:30AM -
12:30PM
Online Class Session Online Instructor: Sabrina Ho All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This is a PCU class for visiting students and not part of the approved Teacher Ed "program". Class runs from 9:30a-12:30p. Class is online and does not create room conflicts. Professional development for faculty advisors, mentor teachers, and other advocates who support PK-12 candidates in the CGU Teacher Education Program. Participants will collaborate, learn, and grow in community with colleagues and candidates; become more adept at operationalizing Critical Social Justice (CSJ) Competencies; develop mutually enhancing mentorship skills; and meet in teams to workshop individual and global concerns. 1 PCU can be earned for synchronous participation in all virtual sessions.

EDUC
PCU118 5049 1 1 M2 Prof Development: Growing as Critical Social Justice Educators and Allies
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:30AM -
12:30PM
Stauffer 106 In-Person Instructor: Sabrina Ho All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Class meets Sat 7/27 in person from 9:30a-12:30p Professional development for faculty advisors, mentor teachers, and other advocates who support PK-12 candidates in the CGU Teacher Education Program. Participants will cultivate community centered around tenets of Critical Social Justice education; share successes and questions around operationalizing Critical Social Justice (CSJ) Competencies; develop coaching skills centered in anti-racist/anti bias pedagogy; and meet in teams to workshop individual and global concerns. 1 PCU can be earned for synchronous participation in all virtual sessions.

EDUC
PCU128 5045 1 3   Action Research for American Indian Language Culture Credential Fellows
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 5:00PM -
8:00PM
Online Class Session Online Instructors: Marcus Aguilar & Minnie Ferguson All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This is a PCU class for visiting students and not part of the approved Teacher Ed "program". Class runs from 5-8p. Class is online and does not create room conflicts. Our students should not be enrolling in other classes that conflict with this time slot and our classes are not open to non-Teacher Ed students who may want to take a class that conflicts with this time. This is the third of the 3 course series designed for the American Indian Language and Culture Credential Fellows. This course will focus on applying the theories, concepts and skills learned in courses I & II to develop an action plan to offer an the American Indian Language/Culture Credential in Tribal Schools.

EDUC
301 5037 1 4 M2 Teach Learn Process for Equity And Social Justice 1 MtplSub
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez, Rebecca Hatkoff MonWedFri 4:30PM -
7:30PM
Online Class Session Hybrid MWF from 7/15-8/16 from 4:30-7:30pm. Friday 8/16 offered online and in-person. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a TK-6 setting. This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program.

EDUC
301S 5039 1 4 M2 Teach Learn Process for Equity And Social Justice 1 SPED
TextbookTextbook
Staff MonWedFri 4:30PM -
7:30PM
Online Class Session Hybrid MWF from 7/15-8/16 from 4:30-7:30pm. Friday 8/16 offered online and in-person. Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a special education K-12 setting. This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. Aligned with the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE), this course aims to prepare candidates for teaching positions in special education settings (mild/moderate and moderate/severe), including inclusive and mainstream environments. This course provides students with an introduction to research-based principles of teaching and learning with particular emphasis placed on the practical implications of effective lesson planning, classroom management, culturally responsive teaching practices, assessment, and effective strategies for reaching all students in diverse settings. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
301S 5039 1 4 M2 Teach Learn Process for Equity And Social Justice 1 SPED
TextbookTextbook
Staff MonWedFri 4:30PM -
7:30PM
Online Class Session Hybrid MWF from 7/15-8/16 from 4:30-7:30pm. Friday 8/16 offered online and in-person. Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a special education K-12 setting. This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. Aligned with the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE), this course aims to prepare candidates for teaching positions in special education settings (mild/moderate and moderate/severe), including inclusive and mainstream environments. This course provides students with an introduction to research-based principles of teaching and learning with particular emphasis placed on the practical implications of effective lesson planning, classroom management, culturally responsive teaching practices, assessment, and effective strategies for reaching all students in diverse settings. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
302 5038 1 4 M2 Teach Learn Process for Equity And Social Justice 1 SnglSub
TextbookTextbook
Staff 4:30PM -
7:30PM
Online Class Session Hybrid MWF from 7/15-8/16 from 4:30-7:30pm. Friday 8/16 offered online and in-person. Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a single-subject settings (typically at the middle- or high-school level). This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. Aligned with the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE), this course aims to prepare candidates for teaching positions in single-subject classrooms. This course provides students with an introduction to research-based principles of teaching and learning with particular emphasis placed on the practical implications of effective lesson planning, classroom management, culturally responsive teaching practices, assessment, and effective strategies for reaching all students in diverse settings. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
302 5038 1 4 M2 Teach Learn Process for Equity And Social Justice 1 SnglSub
TextbookTextbook
Staff 4:30PM -
7:30PM
Online Class Session Hybrid MWF from 7/15-8/16 from 4:30-7:30pm. Friday 8/16 offered online and in-person. Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a single-subject settings (typically at the middle- or high-school level). This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. Aligned with the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE), this course aims to prepare candidates for teaching positions in single-subject classrooms. This course provides students with an introduction to research-based principles of teaching and learning with particular emphasis placed on the practical implications of effective lesson planning, classroom management, culturally responsive teaching practices, assessment, and effective strategies for reaching all students in diverse settings. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
307 5040 1 4 M1 Teach Learn Process 4: Ethnographic Narrative Capstone
TextbookTextbook
Samara Suafoa Sat 9:00AM -
12:00PM
Online Class Session Online Class meets on Saturday: 5/18, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29 synchronously from 9am-12pm and asynchronously from 12pm-4pm. 5/25 is fully asynchronous. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. In TLP IV you will revisit, reflect and ultimately compose an Ethnographic narrative (or alternative project*) that will capture the most salient insights gained from your experience as a first-year Critical Social Justice Educator. The artifacts and sense-making that you do along the way (in TLP I-III) will serve as a valuable source of data and inspiration that will help you craft a "credible, rigorous, and authentic story" Fetterman (2012). Your completed Ethnography will comprise 4 parts: 1) Introduction; 2) Story of Self; 3) Story of students, households & communities; and 4) Conclusion. Your Ethnographic narrative will also include a table of contents, bibliography, appendix and follow APA guidelines. The course will be structured to support you in the writing process with particular emphasis on critical analysis, storytelling and knowledge creation. The course will culminate with a presentation that you will share with your fellow cohorts, faculty and invited guests at the annual Cohort Celebration event.

EDUC
339 5043 1 4   Humanizing Assessment Practices-Leveraging Critical Social Justice in Special Education
TextbookTextbook
Staff Mon 6:00PM -
9:00PM
Online Class Session Hybrid Class meets online synchronous on Mon from 5/13-7/8 from 6-9pm. Class also meets 21 of hours in-person meetings. Additional online synchronous work will be completed weekly Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Candidates will level up their assessment practices by learning how to collect, analyze, and interpret informal and formal assessment data in order to write standards-based, rigorous IEPs appropriate to the student’s instructional program. A strong emphasis will be placed on using multiple measures of data collection across a variety of settings to design IEPs and make program recommendations that are student-centered and reflect the student’s cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Candidates will also administer, analyze, and interpret formal assessment tools and data (i.e. WJ IV) and then practice using formal assessment results to write assessment reports and draft standards-based, rigorous IEPs. Lastly, this course will underscore the importance of establishing strong partnerships with various members of the IEP team including the student, households, school staff, and community agency representatives during the assessment process.  All course activities and assignments will be differentiated to meet the unique needs of Mild/Moderate Support Needs (MMSN) and Extensive Needs (ESN) candidates.

EDUC
339 5043 1 4   Humanizing Assessment Practices-Leveraging Critical Social Justice in Special Education
TextbookTextbook
Staff Mon 6:00PM -
9:00PM
Online Class Session Hybrid Class meets online synchronous on Mon from 5/13-7/8 from 6-9pm. Class also meets 21 of hours in-person meetings. Additional online synchronous work will be completed weekly Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Candidates will level up their assessment practices by learning how to collect, analyze, and interpret informal and formal assessment data in order to write standards-based, rigorous IEPs appropriate to the student’s instructional program. A strong emphasis will be placed on using multiple measures of data collection across a variety of settings to design IEPs and make program recommendations that are student-centered and reflect the student’s cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Candidates will also administer, analyze, and interpret formal assessment tools and data (i.e. WJ IV) and then practice using formal assessment results to write assessment reports and draft standards-based, rigorous IEPs. Lastly, this course will underscore the importance of establishing strong partnerships with various members of the IEP team including the student, households, school staff, and community agency representatives during the assessment process.  All course activities and assignments will be differentiated to meet the unique needs of Mild/Moderate Support Needs (MMSN) and Extensive Needs (ESN) candidates.

EDUC
371 5044 1 2 - 4   Creative Agency: Empowerment through Art and Design Education
TextbookTextbook
Nema Hutton MonWed 5:00PM -
8:00PM
Online Class Session Online Students enrolled in the class for 2 units will meet synchronously on MW from 6/10-7/1 from 5-8pm. Students enrolled in the class for 4 units will meet synchronously on MW from 6/10-7/1 from 5-8pm and will also have asynchronous work and check-ins with faculty on MW from 7/3-7/15. Creativity has long been an important educational aim in Arts Education, and is now considered a key competency for K-12 learning and for workplace success in the 21st century. As such, creativity is increasingly tied to educational, economic and social agency, or the capacity for individuals and communities to realize their full human potential. The arts and design are touted in various school mission statements, required in curricular standards and education code, and are core competencies for college admissions. However, opportunities to cultivate creativity — both in terms of visual and performing arts curricula (VAPA), or arts integration — are particularly limited for students of color, students who speak English as a second language, and those living in underinvested neighborhoods. This interdisciplinary course combining knowledge from education, the arts, and arts administration will examine access issues, and provide strategies to promote creativity among individual students, classrooms, and schools. We will consider roles for a culturally relevant arts education as central to a well-rounded, liberatory education. Using a social justice lens, we will apply critical theory to the arts and culture as modes of inquiry, teaching, and learning. Participants will better understand their own lived experiences and educational goals, and prepare themselves to increase creative opportunities for their classrooms and communities. The course will include critical reading and writing, online content, multi-disciplinary art making, lesson development, relevant research analysis, exposure to guest artists, and facilitated learning opportunities for students, parents, and teachers. This course is well suited for educators, artists, community organizers, entrepreneurs, or others interested in the intersections of Art and Design, Education, Social Justice, Culture, Creativity and Human Flourishing. Students taking the course for 4 units will submit a final project synthesizing course ideas and proposing specific applications of arts integration.

EDUC
380 5041 1 2 M2 Pre-Residency Foundations
TextbookTextbook
Samara Suafoa TueThu 5:00PM -
7:00PM
Online Class Session Online Instructor: Sabrina Ho Class meets on T/Th from 7/16-8/15 from 5-7pm. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is a prerequisite for candidates who choose a Residency pathway toward their Preliminary credential. The focus of this course is to prepare candidates for their teaching residency including working in a mutually beneficial manner with Mentor Teachers, foundations of co-planning lessons and units, engaging and collaboration with colleagues, self-care and wellbeing, organization and work/life balance, supporting students who are classified as English learners as well as students who qualify for Special Education services, co-creating an inclusive physical classroom ecology as well as legal/ethical considerations for first-year teachers.

EDUC
380 5042 2 2 M2 Pre-Residency Foundations
TextbookTextbook
Sheila Nguyen TueThu 5:00PM -
7:00PM
Online Class Session Online Class meets on T/Th from 7/16-8/15 from 5-7pm. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is a prerequisite for candidates who choose a Residency pathway toward their Preliminary credential. The focus of this course is to prepare candidates for their teaching residency including working in a mutually beneficial manner with Mentor Teachers, foundations of co-planning lessons and units, engaging and collaboration with colleagues, self-care and wellbeing, organization and work/life balance, supporting students who are classified as English learners as well as students who qualify for Special Education services, co-creating an inclusive physical classroom ecology as well as legal/ethical considerations for first-year teachers.

EDUC
427 5047 1 2 - 4 M1 Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Praxis for Emergent Bilinguals
TextbookTextbook
Wendy Moore  -
Online Class Session Online Instructor: TBD All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Students enrolled in the class for 2 units will meet synchronously on TTh from 5/14-6/4 from 5-8pm. Students enrolled in the class for 4 units will meet synchronously on TTh from 5/14-6/4 from 5-8pm and will also have asynchronous work and check-ins with faculty on TTh from 6/6-6/20. This course is designed for teachers, instructional coaches, and/or administrators who serve Emergent Bilingual students (EBs) and Non-Mainstream US English (MUSE) speakers in the TK-12 setting.  We will explore theories of language acquisition & language development and the implications for teaching and learning. We will explore social, historial, and political antecedents to current policies and practices that impact EBs.  We will target listening, speaking, reading, and writing through the lens of Critical Social Justice. We will also identify academic language demands across curriculum and develop instructional practices that allow students to meaningfully engage in content area learning. While this is not a California Teachers of English Learners (CTEL) prep course, material covered will help towards preparing for the exam needed to apply for the Crosscultural, Language, and Academic Development (CLAD) certificate. Students taking the course for 4 units will submit a final project synthesizing course ideas and proposing specific praxis to enhance learning for Emergent Bilinguals.

EDUC
450 5091 1 4   Practicum in Student Affairs
TextbookTextbook
Jennifer L Alanis Mon 7:00PM -
9:00PM
Online Class Session Online The practicum class will meet online on the following Mondays from 7pm-9pm: May 20, June 17, July 22, and August 12. Additional meeting times may be determined between instructor and student. Practicum in Student Affair provides you with an opportunity to apply what you have learned in your coursework in the authentic context of a student affairs office or related students affairs position. Students in this class are expected to work on an authentic project within their office at a college or university. The practicum placement is paired with university-based sessions where the students make sense of their practicum experiences as a collective and discuss professional expectations and norms. Central to this approach is your progress toward becoming a practitioner-scholar, a professional who can apply research and scholarship in the field to the everyday demands of a position in student affairs. Students will develop competencies around theories and conceptual frameworks; communication; access & equity; policy & law; and professional socialization.

EDUC
481 5035 1 4 M1 Organization, Administration & Governance in American Higher Education
TextbookTextbook
Mark Figueroa TueThu 7:00PM -
10:00PM
Burkle 22 Hybrid Course is hybrid, with some class sessions fully in-person, and others fully online. This class will meet on select Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. Tuesday/Thursday dates will meet from 7pm-10pm. Saturday dates (6/8 & 6/22) will meet from 9am-3pm. In-person class meetings: 5/14, 5/23, 5/28, 6/4, 6/8, 6/11, 6/22, 6/25 Online class meetings: 5/16, 6/13, 6/20, 6/27 Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class according to the scheduled modality. Higher education is constantly changing and adjusting to internal and external pressures that institutions must balance. The purpose of this course is to understand how institutions of higher education are organized and governed. Students will learn about different context that shape different, organizational structures within administrative units and contemporary issues that higher education institutions must contend with. Additionally, the course will explore how external social and political forces influence how institutions of higher education function.

EDUC
484 5036 1 0 - 4 M1 Practicum in Doctoral Research
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Susan Paik TueThu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This class is designed to help students author a defendable dissertation proposal. Specifically, this course provides students an opportunity to synthesize and apply course-based knowledge regarding doctoral research techniques in a seminar setting. The course is designed for students who have completed their coursework, taken EDUC 580B: Capstone, and who would, in preparation for submitting a dissertation proposal, benefit from collaborative practice and critique. Students will craft problem statements, research questions, conceptual frameworks, and research designs. They will do this work themselves and they will discuss the work of their peers, honing their skills together as they do so. As a result of this structured and iterative process, students should be better prepared to produce a dissertation research proposal that represents both the culmination to their doctoral education and an original contribution to knowledge in their fields. Over the course of the term, students in the class will check-in with their dissertation chair to ensure that they and their chairs are “on the same page” regarding their dissertation research. Lastly, this class is offered satisfactory/unsatisfactory and will have scheduled (weekly) class meetings. Students who do not attend the class sessions, do not make satisfactory progress on the assignments, and do not participate in class activities will not pass this class. It is expected that this class will only be taken once (for 0-units/no cost). If the course needs to be retaken, the student will need to obtain permission from his/her/their academic advisor and dean and will be charged for 2-units (with no department fellowships provided). If the course needs to be taken a third time, the student will need to obtain permission from his/her/their academic advisor and dean and will be charged for 4-units (with no department fellowships provided). Often taking/passing this class is a condition for an “extension of time” being granted.

EDUC
548 5033 1 4 M1 Higher Education & the Law
TextbookTextbook
Staff Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McManus 31 Hybrid Course is hybrid, with some class sessions fully in-person, and others fully online. This class will meet in-person on Mondays and will meet online on Wednesdays. The following dates will be in-person class meetings: 5/13, 5/20, 6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24. The following dates will be online class meetings: 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26. The class will have an additional 3 hours of individualized instruction. Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class This course will have a twofold purpose. First, we will examine the legal underpinnings of our post-secondary colleges and universities, and explore how such institutions – private and public - evolved in a legal context and how federal and state regulations came into play on campuses. The second perspective discusses legal concepts in individual college settings and the issues affecting the relationships and interests of the various members of the campus community. In each perspective, we will address how various laws and legal policies impacts particular roles, functions and responsibilities of post-secondary administrators.

EDUC
548 5033 1 4 M1 Higher Education & the Law
TextbookTextbook
Staff Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McManus 31 Hybrid Course is hybrid, with some class sessions fully in-person, and others fully online. This class will meet in-person on Mondays and will meet online on Wednesdays. The following dates will be in-person class meetings: 5/13, 5/20, 6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24. The following dates will be online class meetings: 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26. The class will have an additional 3 hours of individualized instruction. Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class This course will have a twofold purpose. First, we will examine the legal underpinnings of our post-secondary colleges and universities, and explore how such institutions – private and public - evolved in a legal context and how federal and state regulations came into play on campuses. The second perspective discusses legal concepts in individual college settings and the issues affecting the relationships and interests of the various members of the campus community. In each perspective, we will address how various laws and legal policies impacts particular roles, functions and responsibilities of post-secondary administrators.

EDUC
574 5032 1 4 M1 Community-based, Participatory Research: Focus on Transformative Movement Organizing
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Tessa Hicks-Peterson Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 35 Hybrid Course is hybrid, with some class sessions fully in-person, and others fully online. This class will meet in-person on Mondays and will meet online on Wednesdays. The following dates will be in-person class meetings: 5/13, 5/20, 6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24. The following dates will be online class meetings: 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19. The class will have an additional 6 hours of individualized instruction. Instructional time includes in-person meetings and online meetings/activities which may be synchronous, asynchronous or a combination of both. Students are expected to attend class acc This course provides an introduction to community-based participatory research methods (CBPR), reviewing the origins and intentions of this form of collaborative research as well as ways to effectively and respectfully engage in its methods (including community engagement, archival research, GIS, interviews, and focus groups). Students will then have the opportunity to engage in research design, data collection, and analysis in collaboration with community partners. The course’s community partners are leaders in local grassroots, community organizations that are on the frontlines of radical movements in the region related to issues of immigration, incarceration, education, labor organizing/worker’s rights and food justice. Students will collaboratively design a short research project with community partners based on community interests, assets and needs. Another focus in this class will be on Transformative Movement Organizing, which pertains generally to the ways in which social movements and community-based organizations themselves exercise personal and organizational transformative practices as part of their work for social change. Some of the foci of our community-based participatory research collaborations will involve looking at this by exploring what our community partners self-identify as challenging organizational issues as well as existing practices for community care and potential organizational assets that could be more effectively mobilized. Students will simultaneously engage contemporary texts on the topics of Transformative Movement Organizing and healing justice to see how these models can speak directly to the community-identified issues in order to provide an actionable report back to community organizations about what the research findings are and recommendations based on effective transformative movement strategies and practices. Additional readings on the context and relevant scholarship of the areas of study (i.e., immigration, incarceration, education, labor organizing/worker’s rights and food justice) will be included, along with theories and strategies for effective community-based research and social change work. Each student will assume the role and responsibilities of the community-based researcher by co-designing and conducting research, assessment, analysis and reporting on the community-based research collaboration. Established community partners and research foci will be pre-determined based on the research partnerships that are overseen by the professor and have been generated for years through CASA PITZER: Critical Action & Social Advocacy Community Hub.

EDUC
629UL-B 5057 1 4   Data Analytics for Effective Decision-Making (Part B)
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David Drew MonTueThu 7:00PM -
10:00PM
Burkle 26 Hybrid Mondays, Tuesday, Thursdays, Sunday; All Mondays, Tuesday, and Thursdays will be from 7-10pm; Sunday date (6/30) will be from 1-4pm. In-person meetings: 5/13, 6/6, 6/27, 6/30, 7/1. Online meetings: 5/16, 5/20, 5/28, 6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/20, 6/24. Increasingly educational leaders must make decisions based upon analyses of data about student learning and about the effectiveness or their organization. In addition, doctoral students need to know how to read the research literature with a critical eye. More to the point, they need to know how to conduct rigorous quantitative research. The course introduces the student to techniques available for collecting and analyzing research data. Strong emphasis is placed upon understanding why a special technique should be selected in a given situation. At the outset we shall focus on the ways in which data are gathered. Thus, we shall review briefly problem statement, conceptualization, sampling, questionnaire construction, survey and interview methods, and the use of secondary data. The concept of scales will receive special attention since it is the primary criterion for selection of statistical techniques.

EDUC
630UL-B 5048 1 4   Qualitative Research for Urban School Leaders (Part B)
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Susan Bush-Mecenas Sat 9:00AM -
4:00PM
Stauffer 110 In-Person All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. Meeting dates: 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/15, 6/29 The purpose of this seminar is to become familiar with qualitative research – the theoretical perspectives, types, purposes, methods and procedures. Seminar participants will examine and review two high quality published research articles that are related to their own research interests and that have employed qualitative methods. Application of the theory, types, procedures and methods will be integrated as we work as a class to develop your own mini-pre-proposal. Participants will develop this mini-pre qualitative research proposal during the course of the semester – applying the best principles of qualitative research. In addition, participants will also develop an interview protocol, as well as conduct, transcribe and evaluate one interview using the protocol and subsequently revise the interview form accordingly. Participants will also hear from some graduates who have used qualitative research in their own work.

ENGLISH
499 5142 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
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. Faculty  -
No Room Needed In-Person Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EVAL
385 5063 1 4   Evaluation & Applied Research Procedures
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Lisa M Dillman Mon 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is designed to help students translate what they have learned in previous courses into practice. The course will use a group based project where students connect with clients virtually to develop an evaluation proposal. Students will also engage in group/team activities, and interactive discussions to teach students how to respond to various evaluation situations ranging from the technical, methodological, logistical, and political that commonly occur in practice. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with different approaches to evaluation practice, gain a better understanding of the issues that frequently emerge in evaluation contexts, and have a set of tools and skills to help deal with these practice issues.

ISP
201 5022 1 0 M1 Academic Writing & Research I
TextbookTextbook
Marcus S Weakley  -
Online Class Session Online This course is exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is primarily for students in the International Scholars Program. It will help students learn to critically read academic texts, take notes effectively, and evaluate information for writing purposes while writing a range of texts. This course will also explore study skills and strategies that promote effective and independent learning. Finally, students will learn to describe the basic tenets of effective research, distinguish between the major types of research, and demonstrate an understanding of a range of research skills through writing assignments.

ISP
205 5023 1 0 M1 Academic Listening & Speaking I
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Marcus S Weakley  -
Online Class Session Online This course is exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. his course is primarily for students in the International Scholars Program. It will help students develop and use English to communicate effectively in academic settings. Students will learn strategies for using the specialized vocabularies of their fields, how to listen and take notes effectively, and other skills in development of their aural/oral literacy. It will also include pronunciation practice Further, this course will teach students how to prepare and deliver oral presentations and engage in class and other academic listening and speaking contexts effectively.

ISP
251 5024 1 0   Academic Writing & Research II
TextbookTextbook
Marcus S Weakley  -
Online Class Session Online This course is exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is primarily for students in the International Scholars Program. It will help students acquire a level of English language proficiency sufficient to participate effectively in graduate classes and utilize those skills for higher-level conceptual learning. Students will learn to recognize and assess authority and evidence in academic and apply critical and analytical reasoning skills to assess academic texts. It will also prepare students to write their own research projects by learning how to identify major issues in research design and interpret data through a paradigm. Students will write a range of texts, appropriate to purpose, audience, and tone.

ISP
255 5025 1 0   Academic Listening & Speaking II
TextbookTextbook
Marcus S Weakley  -
Online Class Session Online This course is exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is primarily for students in the International Scholars Program. It will help students acquire a level of English language proficiency sufficient to participate effectively in graduate classes and utilize those skills for higher-level conceptual learning. Students will learn strategies for using the specialized vocabularies of their fields and other skills in development of their aural/oral literacy while attending to topics like the American graduate education culture and work environment, information literacy, the rationale and practice of group work, and the use of critical and analytical thinking skills.

IST
314 5014 1 4   Enterprise Systems and Supply Chain Management
TextbookTextbook
Itamar Shabtai Tue 2:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course aims to provide basic knowledge and deep understanding of the contribution of information systems on the strategic and operational levels. It will focus on how to plan and manage efficient business processes to enable digital integration and collaboration between various parts of the supply chain. The course will cover topics such as: SCM (supply chain management), BPR (business processes reengineering), ERP (enterprise resource planning) as well as the whole process of the adoption of the right solution including software selection, in-house vs. cloud platforms, the implementation process and assimilation challenges within the organization. The course will provide the students with hands-on experience by using modern applications (such as: ERP, BPM and SCM) to apply the theoretical models and gain practical knowledge.

IST
330 5074 1 1 - 4   Supervised Professional Practice in IS&T
TextbookTextbook
Itamar Shabtai  -
No Room Needed Supervision No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. Example: Students participating in Teacher Education Internships are supervised and have periodic check-ins with class instructors The goal of the supervised professional practice course is to enrich students' educational training in information systems and technology fields by providing an opportunity to apply theory and skills acquired from their classes to a professional setting. Students contribute to an organization or company’s resources and to specific projects while developing personal confidence and leadership as an IS&T professional.

IST
377B 5015 1 4 M1 Location-based Market Intelligence
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Matthew Muga MonWed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The rapid change and evolution of technology continues to offer companies unique opportunities to constantly learn more about their Customers and the markets in which they serve. This course will show you how by unlocking potential through cutting edge solutions like ArcGIS Business Analyst you are positioning yourself and your organization right on the cutting edge for things to come as you become more familiar with your Customers. This is critical because as the old saying in business goes “If you don’t take care of your Customers, someone else will”. Countless companies have failed due to their neglect in this area.

IST
611 5016 1 4 M2 Data Science Management & Analysis
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Ruben E Quinonez MonWed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course will focus on the challenges and opportunities of Data Science from three different perspectives: strategic, tactical, and operational. From the strategic perspective, the IT and business leader needs to understand how data and big data become an asset that can enhance growth and ensure successful digital transformation. From a tactical perspective, the executive needs to focus his/her attention on the development of standards, management of the model portfolio, amongst others. At the operational level, the analyst needs to concentrate on the techniques that lead to efficient and effective model building outcomes. These three perspectives should equip the future IT and business leader to better manage the data science capability of the organization. The course will combine theoretical knowledge as a foundation and hands-on experience using various model building techniques.

LANGUAGE
171 5027 1 0 M2 Spanish for Reading Knowledge
TextbookTextbook
Cesar A. Solorzano MonTueWedThuFri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Session Online This course is designed to prepare students for language exams as required by certain degrees. The instructor will facilitate the exam during the last week of the course. Class is synchronous from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Then, the instructor will be present until 11:50 a.m. for students to complete asynchronous work together. No class on July 4th and July 5th. Intensive workshop in reading Spanish language at graduate level. Preparation for qualifying exams and research tool.

MGT
390 5070 1 2 M2 Economics of Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Tue 6:30PM -
8:20PM
Online Class Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This class uses the business-related tenets of economics (old and new) to generate a modern, consistent, formal framework for strategic decision-making. Using economic intuition we will be able to address issues ranging from outsourcing to new product lines. We will be able to explain why some firms actively compete through price changes while others, in apparently similar competitive industries, do not. Economic theories seem very abstract to many students because these theories usually assume many unrealistic things about people and society. Students must be mindful of the fact that these assumptions are what allow economists to answer many otherwise intractable questions. The results that we attain usually hold even without these simplifying assumptions. This class will show how some of these economic models can provide a powerful, formal framework for answering managerial questions ranging from dealing with competition to setting proper incentives for managers.

MGT
401 5059 1 2 - 4 M1 Global Immersion
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Colinne Bartel Fri 7:00PM -
10:00PM
Burkle 24 Hybrid Claremont April 26 7:00-10:00 pm; Germany May 18-24; Online June 8 9:00 am-12:00 pm In this course students gain a deep understanding regarding the international dimensions of management through a combination of in-class learning and an immersive study abroad experience. The substantive context and international location will vary. The immersive on-site international experience includes organization visits, structured meetings with managers and leaders, cultural experiences, and experiential learning with a faculty member. This course provides an important experiential dimension to the study of management within international settings.

MGT
482 5066 1 2 M1 Game Theory
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Jay Prag Iv Tue 6:30PM -
8:20PM
Online Class Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Decision-making is literally an art and a science. The formal, analytical tools (from economics and mathematics) that largely fall under the heading of game theory allow us to take a rational approach to the decisions that have discrete choices and clear paths. Strategy, brinksmanship, coercion and cooperation are some of the ways of describing the human elements of decision-making. This class will combine many real-world examples of game theory and strategic decision-making with in-class, participatory renditions of games, decisions and interpersonal strategies.

MGT
516 5073 1 2 M2 Operations Management
TextbookTextbook
Munirpallam Appadorai Venkataramanan Mon 6:30PM -
8:00PM
Online Class Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The intent of this course is to further provide management and analytical concepts/tools for the management of operations and the decision-making process within the scope of the supply chain. Competitive advantage driven by supply chain strategy has been a common practice in the business environment in the past few years. Most of the strategies involve improving operational efficiency either through cost reductions or increase capital efficiency. Decision-making regarding operational issues is one of the most common tasks within organizations. This course will enhance students' ability to perform the quantitative analysis necessary and understand the management issues in order to make good operational decisions within the supply chain. Coverage is topical and will include supply chains issue and strategy, operations management framework, the Six Sigma approach, quality management, demand and supply planning, inventory deployment/control, and transportation networks optimization. Other topics will be added as the course progresses. The introduction of concepts via cases is preferred whenever appropriate.

MGT
530 5072 1 2 M2 Marketing Management
TextbookTextbook
Haakon T Brown Wed 6:30PM -
8:00PM
Online Class Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course introduces marketing and its role within organizations. It introduces the marketing concept, examines its relationship to other functions in the firm and looks at techniques and frameworks used to examine marketing environments, understand consumer and organizational buying behavior, segment markets and position products.

MGT
570 5067 1 2 M1 Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick 6:30PM -
8:00PM
Online Class Online Class Meeting Dates: 6/10, 6/12, 6/17, 6/20, 6/24, 6/26, 6/28 All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a foundation of the fundamental skills they will need to understand, diagnose, and manage organizational behavior in order to attain the organization’s mission more effectively. We will conduct structured classroom exercises geared toward discovering your own strengths and their potential for optimizing your contribution to an organization.

MGT
585 5068 1 2 M1 Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Hideki Yamawaki Mon 6:30PM -
9:30PM
Online Class Online Class Meeting Dates: 5/13 6:30-9:30; 5/16, 5/28, 5/30, 6/3, 6/6, 6:30-8:00 All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The focus of this course is on how general managers enhance and sustain business performance. The course covers analytical and conceptual tools that are aids to the development of decision. Its fundamental focus, however, is not on tools but on sharpening skills at developing robust judgments in the face of uncertainty and complexity. The central concept of this course is that of strategy. Strategy is enabled and constrained by the underlying economic and political conditions that prevail in an industry or a country, as well as by the resources available to management.

MGT
810 5113 1 9 M1 CPC Executive Leadership Institute
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Katharina Pick MonTueWedThuFriSatSun 8:00AM -
5:00PM
To Be Determined In-Person All instructional time occurs during face-to-face, synchronous meetings on-campus or another location. This is an Executive Education Class: Class will meet every day beginning June 1 - June 15. 6/1, 6/2, 6/3, 6/4, 6/5, 6/6, 6/7, 6/8, 6/9, 6/10, 6/11, 6/12, 6/13, 6/14, 6/15 Class begins at 8:00 a.m. and ends at 5:00 p.m. This program is designed to enhance leadership skills through readings, class projects and workshops by faculty and subject matter experts. Registration is only open to students in the CPC Executive Leadership Institute.

PP
319I 5019 1 4 M1 Special Topics in American Politics: Critically Evaluating Democracy in America - Backsliding?
TextbookTextbook
Carlos A. Algara MonTue 2:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Session Online This course will meet twice a week on Mondays and Tuesdays. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. In comparing the American democratic experiment to Europe during the 19th century, Alexis de Tocqueville remarked that “the position of the Americans is quite exceptional, and it may be believed that no democratic people will ever be placed in a similar one.” In doing so, de Tocqueville noted the seemingly democratic impulses found in the United States were an outlier compared to the autocratic regimes found in Europe. Indeed, America’s democratic impulses, and emphasis on equality, has long been its defining feature and a key normative framework comprising the American identity. However, recent commentators question the degree of democracy in contemporary America given the perceived domestic (and worldwide) rise of populism and erosion of democratic cornerstones, such as societal equality and access to the ballot box. In this course, we critically evaluate this claim by evaluating to what extent is the characterization of America as a country with strong democratic impulses warranted? Moreover, we also critically evaluate whether the democratic nature of America changes over time, particularly considering the expansion of voting rights in the 20th century and recent scholars decrying “democratic backsliding” across the U.S. states. This course draws on historical, sociological, and political science work to examine democratic performance, both in theory and in practice, in the United States. We begin by examining the theoretical foundations of democratic representation that underpins the American experiment. Second, we evaluate the degree to which access to this system of representation changes overtime, with particular focus on efforts to extend the franchise on gender, class, and racial grounds. Lastly, we critically evaluate the thesis brought forth by contemporary commentators of American democracy, which posits that the United States is currently undergoing a period of “democratic backsliding” fueled, in part, by the rise of populism domestically. Readings will address both empirical and normative questions regarding the nature of American democracy.

PP
499 5114 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon  -
To Be Determined Supervision No class meetings or shared instructional activity. Used for internships, field placements, etc. Example: Students participating in Teacher Education Internships are supervised and have periodic check-ins with class instructors Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PSYCH
350UD 5065 1 2 M2 Design Your Tech Career
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Green Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. For students seeking technology careers in UX Research, Product Design, Product Management, and Development, this course provides structured support for navigating the tech job market. Embark on a journey of self-discovery to uncover which tech jobs you are best suited for. Students will benefit from practical career coaching, portfolio reviews, mock interviews, resume refinement, and personalized guidance to effectively transition from academia to the workforce. Open to all CGU students

PSYCH
352L 5064 1 2 - 4   Professional Development in Evaluation & Applied Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Stewart Donaldson  -
Online Class Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This class aims to introduce students to a variety of evaluation related topics and issues, with the purpose of developing a broader perspective on the field. Students can select four different day long professional development courses and are encouraged to consider how to best apply what they have learned to their own evaluation knowledge and understanding. Enrollment in 2 TEI courses - eligible for 2 units Enrollment in 4 TEI courses - eligible for 4 units

PSYCH
354L 5017 1 4   Empowerment Evaluation
TextbookTextbook
David Fetterman  -
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course will train student to conduct an empowerment evaluation, a self-assessment and community-controlled approach to evaluation. It is a tool to contribute to social justice. The theory, concepts, principles, and steps of the approach will be explored. Concrete real-world case examples will be presented and explored, highlighting how empowerment evaluation is practiced in a variety of community program and organizational settings. Settings range from Silicon Valley to 4th and 5th grade classrooms. In addition, the socio-political dynamics (controversies) associated with introducing new ideas to the academy will be examined. Empowerment evaluation, as a case example, highlights both world-wide acceptance and vehement resistance.

SP&E
471 5020 1 4 M2 Strategic Modeling for Politics, Economics, & Business Decisions
TextbookTextbook
Mark Abdollahian MonWed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Session Hybrid This course will meet twice a week on Mondays and Wednesdays. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of several decision-making approaches in political science. The course is divided into four substantive sections emphasizing both theory and applications. The first section deals with a general overview of approaches and assumptions underlying positive decision making in political science. The second section focuses on game theory, the third section centers on expected utility theory and finally the final section deals with spatial bargaining models.

TEI
301 5101 1 0 M2 Basics of Program Evaluation: Strengths-Informed and Cross-Cultural Applications
TextbookTextbook
Stewart Donaldson MonThuFri 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. With an emphasis on constructing a sound foundational knowledge base guided by the American Evaluation Association (AEA) evaluator competencies and public statement on cultural competence in evaluation, this course is designed to provide an overview of both past and contemporary perspectives on evaluation theory, method, and practice. Course topics include, but are not limited to, basic evaluation concepts and definitions; the view of evaluation as transdisciplinary; the logic of evaluation; an overview of the history of the field; distinctions between evaluation and basic and applied social science research; evaluation-specific methods; reasons and motives for conducting evaluation; central types and purposes of evaluation; objectivity, bias, design sensitivity, and validity; the function of program theory and logic models in evaluation; evaluator roles; core competencies required for conducting high quality, professional evaluation; audiences and users of evaluation; alternative evaluation models and approaches; the political nature of evaluation and its implications for practice; professional standards and codes of conduct; strengths-informed and cross-cultural applications; and emerging and enduring issues in evaluation theory, method, and practice. Although the major focus of the course is program evaluation in multiple settings (e.g., public health, education, human and social services, and international development), examples from personnel evaluation, product evaluation, organizational evaluation, and systems evaluation also will be used to illustrate foundational concepts. The course will conclude with how to plan, design, and conduct ethical and high-quality program evaluations using a contingency-based and contextually/culturally responsive approach, including evaluation purposes, resources (e.g., time, budget, expertise), uses and users, competing demands, and other relevant contingencies.

TEI
302 5093 1 0 M2 Creating and Implementing Successful Evaluation Surveys
TextbookTextbook
Jason Siegel MonTueWed 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. The success of many evaluation projects depends on the quality of survey data collected. In the last decade, sample members have become increasingly reluctant to respond, especially in evaluation contexts. In response to these challenges and to technological innovation, methods for doing surveys are changing rapidly. This course will provide new and cutting-edge information about best practices for designing and conducting surveys. Students will gain an understanding of the multiple sources of survey error and how to identify and fix commonly occurring survey issues. The course will cover writing questions; visual design of questions (drawing on concepts from the vision sciences); question ordering; increasing effortful responding; and increasing response rates. The course is made up of a mixture of PowerPoint presentations, discussions, and activities built around real-world survey examples and case studies. Participants will apply what they are learning in activities and will have ample opportunity to ask questions during the course (or during breaks) and to discuss the survey challenges they face with the instructor and other participants.

TEI
306 5096 1 0 M2 Evaluating Training Programs
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. Faculty WedThuFri 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: Ann Doucette Many of our social programs focus on knowledge acquisition, increasing and building constructive awareness, changing attitudes, and influencing and promoting behavioral change to optimize the experience of program/intervention participants. This type of effort is collectively referred to as training – advancing meaningful competencies for a specific purpose – filling knowledge, skill, and capacity gaps to achieve favorable improvement and/or progress. This course examines training within the sphere of demonstrated capacities (knowledge gained, attitudinal change, behavioral intent, and demonstration, institutional/organizational benefits). What makes training work? How will such changes affect the participating individuals and their social networks? What is the impact of training/capacity building at the organizational and system levels? The evaluation of training programs, especially behavioral application of content, and organizational benefits from these efforts continues to be a significant evaluation challenge. The course is interactive and provides a practical approach for planning, implementing, conducting, or managing such evaluations. The course covers an overview of training evaluation models; pre-training assessment and training program expectations; training evaluation planning; development of key indicators, metrics, and measures; training evaluation designs; data collection – instrumentation and administration, data quality; reporting progress, change at the individual and institutional levels, and results. The course addresses institutional outcomes of training related efforts – knowledge management and MEL (monitoring, evaluation, and learning) initiatives. Case examples are included throughout the course to illustrate the course content. The challenges in evaluating training capacity building, knowledge management and MEL efforts, and strategies for mitigating these challenges are highlighted.

TEI
310 5105 1 0 M2 Intermediate Qualitative Data Analysis
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. Faculty TueWed 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: Delwyn Goodrick Data analysis involves creativity, sensitivity and rigor. In its most basic form qualitative data analysis involves some sort of labeling, coding and clustering in order to make sense of data collected from evaluation fieldwork, interviews, and/or document analysis. This intermediate level workshop builds on basic coding and categorizing familiar to most evaluators, and extends the array of strategies available to support rigorous interpretations. This workshop presents an array of approaches to support the analysis of qualitative data with an emphasis on procedures for the analysis of interview data. Strategies such as enumerative and interpretive content analysis, thematic analysis, narrative analysis, and the framework method of analysis are presented and illustrated with reference to examples from evaluation and from a range of disciplines, including sociology, education, political science and psychology. The core emphasis in the workshop is creating awareness of heuristics that support selection and application of appropriate analytic techniques that match the purpose of the evaluation, type of data, and practical considerations such as resource constraints. While a brief overview of qualitative analysis software is provided, the structure of the workshop focuses on analysis using manual methods. Qualitative data analysis and writing go hand in hand. In the second part of the workshop strategies for transforming analysis through processes of description, interpretation and judgment will be presented. These issues are particularly important in the assessment of the credibility of qualitative evidence by evaluation audiences. Issues of quality, including validity, trustworthiness and authenticity of qualitative data are integrated throughout the workshop.

TEI
311 5102 1 0 M2 Introduction to Cost-Benefit and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis
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. Faculty WedThuFri 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: Robert D. Shand The tools and techniques of cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis will be presented. The goal of the course is to provide analysts with the skills to interpret cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses. Content includes identification and measurement of costs using the ingredients method; how to specify effectiveness; shadow pricing for benefits using revealed preference and contingent valuation methods; discounting; calculation of cost-effectiveness ratios, net present value, cost-benefit ratios, and internal rates of return. Sensitivity testing and uncertainty will also be addressed. Individuals will work in groups to assess various costs, effects, and benefits applicable to selected case studies across various policy fields. Case studies will be selected from across policy fields (e.g. health, education, environmental sciences).

TEI
312 5100 1 0 M2 Introduction to Data Analysis for Evaluators and Applied Researchers
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Wesley Schultz MonTue 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. In this course we will introduce and review basic data analysis tools and concepts commonly used in applied research and evaluation. The focus will be on fundamental concepts that are needed to guide decisions for appropriate data analyses, interpretations, and presentations. The goal of the course is to help participants avoid errors and improve skills as data analysts, communicators of statistical findings, and consumers of data analyses. Topics include data screening and cleaning, selecting appropriate methods for analysis, detecting statistical pitfalls and dealing with them, avoiding silly statistical mistakes, interpreting statistical output, and presenting findings to lay and professional audiences. Examples will include applications of basic distributions and statistical tests (e.g., z, t, chi-square, correlation, regression).

TEI
313 5095 1 0 M2 Introduction to R Programming for Data Analysis and Visualization
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. Faculty ThuFri 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: David Wilson This course will introduce you to the R programming language for data analysis and data visualization. The course will introduce you to importing data into R, basic data manipulations and clean-up, common graphing methods, and basic statistical analyses such as t-tests, chi-square, ANOVA, and regression, as well as standard descriptive statistics. The course will use the RStudio interface for R and will introduce you to using RMarkdown for enhancing analysis replicability and documentation. The course will focus on the programming language and assumes you are already familiar with basic statistical methods. Note: Attendees should bring their own laptops loaded with R and RStudio to class each day.

TEI
316 5103 1 0 M2 Mixed-Methods Evaluations: Integrating Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches
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. Faculty WedThuFri 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: Debra J. Rog Evaluators are frequently in evaluation situations in which they are collecting data through multiple methods, often both qualitative and quantitative. Too often, however, these study components are conducted and reported independently, and do not maximize the explanation building that can occur through their integration. The purpose of this course is to sensitize evaluators to the opportunities in their work for designing and implementing mixed methods, and to be more intentional in the ways that they design and implement their studies to incorporate both qualitative and quantitative approaches. The course will begin with an overview of the issues involved with mixed-methods research, highlighting the accolades and the criticisms of integrating approaches. The course will then focus on the research questions and evaluation situations that are conducive for mixed-methods, and the variety of designs that are possible (e.g., parallel mixed methods that occur at the same time and are integrated in their inference; sequential designs in which one method follows another chronologically, either confirming or disconfirming the findings, or providing further explanation). A key focus of the course will be on strategies for implementing mixed-methods designs, as well as analyzing and reporting data, using examples from the instructor’s work and those offered by course participants. The course will be highly interactive, with ample time for participants to discuss how the course can be applied to their own work. Participants will work in small groups on an example that will carry through the three days of the course. Participants will be sent materials prior to the course as a foundation for the method.

TEI
318 5097 1 0 M2 Outcome and Impact Evaluation
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. Faculty WedThuFri 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: Melvin Mark Valid assessment of the outcomes or impact of a social program is among the most challenging evaluation tasks, but also one of the most important. Multiple approaches exist for tracking or detecting a program’s outcomes, and multiple methods and designs exist for trying to estimate a program’s impact. This course will overview alternative approaches that may be more appropriate under different conditions. This includes monitoring approaches based on a small-t theory of the program’s chain of outcomes, as well as approaches to use when the complexity of the situation precludes placing one’s confidence in such a theory of the program. Considerable attention will be given to the experimental and quasi-experimental methods that are the foundation for much of contemporary impact evaluation. Related topics, including issues in the measurement of outcomes, ensuring detection of meaningful program effects, and interpreting the magnitude of effects, will be covered, some briefly. Emphasis will primarily be conceptual, focusing on the logic of outcome and impact evaluation, the appropriateness of different approaches under different circumstances, and the conceptual and methodological nature of the approaches. Nonetheless, we’ll cover key statistical analysis methods for impact evaluation.

TEI
321 5104 1 0 M2 Qualitative Methods
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. Faculty WedThuFri 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: Michael Q. Patton Qualitative inquiries use in-depth interviews, focus groups, observational methods, document analysis, and case studies to provide rich descriptions of people, programs, and community processes. To be credible and useful, the unique sampling, design, and analysis approaches of qualitative methods must be understood and used. Qualitative data can be used for various purposes including evaluating individualized outcomes, capturing program processes, exploring a new area of interest (e.g., to identify the unknown variables one might want to measure in greater depth/breadth), identifying unanticipated consequences, and side effects, supporting participatory evaluations, assessing quality, and humanizing evaluations by portraying the people and stories behind the numbers. This class will cover the basics of qualitative evaluation, including design, case selection (purposeful sampling), data collection techniques, and beginning analysis. Ways of increasing the rigor and credibility of qualitative evaluations will be examined. Mixed methods approaches will be included. Alternative qualitative strategies and new, innovative directions will complete the course. The strengths and weaknesses of various qualitative methods will be identified. Exercises will provide experience in applying qualitative methods and analysis in evaluations.

TEI
322 5107 1 0 M2 Strategic Planning with Evaluation in Mind
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. Faculty WedThuFri 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: John Bryson Strategic planning is becoming a common practice for governments, nonprofit organizations, businesses, and collaborations. The severe stresses facing these entities make strategic planning more important and necessary than ever. For strategic planning to be really effective it should include systematic learning informed by evaluation. If that happens, the chances of mission fulfillment and long-term organizational survival are also enhanced. In other words, thinking, acting, and learning strategically and evaluatively are necessary complements. This course examines the theory and practice of strategic planning and management with an emphasis on practical approaches to identifying and effectively addressing organizational challenges – and doing so in a way that makes systematic learning and evaluation possible. The approach engages evaluators much earlier in the process of organizational and programmatic design and change than is usual. The following topics are covered: -Understanding why strategic planning has become so important -Understanding what strategic planning is – and is not -Gaining knowledge of the range of different strategic planning approaches Understanding the Strategy Change Cycle -Gaining experience with key strategic planning tools and techniques, including stakeholder analysis, SWOT analyses, and causal mapping for purposes of understanding issues, developing strategies, and conducting evaluations -Knowing how to appropriately design formative, summative, and developmental evaluations of strategic planning processes, missions, strategies, and organizational performance

TEI
323 5098 1 0 M2 Systems-based Culturally Responsive Evaluation (SysCRE)
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Wanda D. Casillas MonTueWed 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Culturally Responsive Evaluation (CRE) is often described as a way of thinking, a stance taken, or an emerging approach to evaluation that centers culture and context in all steps of an evaluation process. As an evaluation approach, CRE is often used in service of promoting equitable outcomes across many sectors such as education, health, social services, etc. However, large-scale social problems require evaluation and applied research strategies that can further our thinking about complex issues and equip us to engage with the complex and layered contextual factors that impact equity. CRE is an essential tool in a practitioner’s toolkit when evaluating large-scale systems change efforts that emphasize equity; and CRE married with relevant and overlapping systems principles leads to a robust evaluation and applied research practice. In this course, we will engage with a core set of CRE and systems principles to anchor evaluation practice in an approach that identifies and addresses important cultural and contextual systems in which evaluations and their stakeholders are embedded. The first day of the workshop will focus on establishing a foundation of important historical underpinnings, concepts, and tenets of CRE and systems approaches and engage with exemplars of SysCRE practice to operationalize these concepts. On Days 2 and 3 of the workshop, we will simulate a step-wise SysCRE design using a case study and other interactive exercises to inform personal and professional practices and support group learning.

TEI
325 5108 1 0 M2 Utilization-Focused Evaluation
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. Faculty Fri 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: Michael Q. Patton Utilization-Focused Evaluation begins with the premise that evaluations should be judged by their utility and actual use; therefore, evaluators should facilitate the evaluation process and design any evaluation with careful consideration of how everything that is done, from beginning to end, will affect use. Use concerns how real people in the real world apply evaluation findings and experience the evaluation process. Therefore, the focus in utilization-focused evaluation is on the intended use by intended users. Utilization-focused evaluation is a process for helping primary intended users select the most appropriate content, model, methods, theory, and uses for their particular situation. Situational responsiveness guides the interactive process between the evaluator and primary intended users. Psychology of use undergirds and informs utilization-focused evaluation: intended users are more likely to use evaluations if they understand and feel ownership of the evaluation process and findings; they are more likely to understand and feel ownership if they’ve been actively involved; by actively involving primary intended users, the evaluator is training users in use, preparing the groundwork for use, and reinforcing the intended utility of the evaluation every step along the way. Participants will learn: • Key factors in doing useful evaluations, common barriers to use, and how to overcome those barriers. • Implications of focusing an evaluation on the intended use by intended users. • Options for evaluation design and methods based on situational responsiveness, adaptability, and creativity. • Ways of building evaluation into the programming process to increase use.

TEI
332 5094 1 0 M2 Introduction to Machine Learning for Evaluators
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. Faculty MonTueWed 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. There is a growing demand from public and private policymakers and funders to apply big data science and machine learning for evaluation. The demand is growing due to public awareness of how the private sector uses machine learning algorithms to create on-demand tools that cost-effectively augment human planning, assessment, prediction, and decision-making. In fact, government agencies like the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services are currently using big data science and machine learning to evaluate their impact. When applied correctly, machine learning algorithms can significantly reduce the cost and time of conducting evaluations, including producing on-demand quasi-experimental actionable evidence on an ongoing basis. In this introductory course, participants will learn the fundamentals of integrating the theory, methods, and machine learning algorithms of big data science into their evaluation approach. This will include an introduction to Bayesian theory, machine learning algorithms, predictive and prescriptive analytics, causal modeling, and addressing selection and algorithmic bias. The course will guide participants through an interactive step-by-step process of building evaluation models using primary and secondary datasets. This course will introduce machine learning algorithms for structured (quantitative, ordinal, and categorical) and unstructured (qualitative text) data modeling, including how to train machine learning algorithms to support conducting a mixed methods evaluation. For text analytics, participants will learn about natural language processing (NLP) algorithms that are used to improve the breadth and depth of qualitative analyses while significantly reducing the time it takes. The course will use an open-source, no-cost, no-code (knowledge of R or Python is not required) visual-based analytics platform – KNIME – and will introduce participants to its suite of analytic tools and machine learning algorithms.

TEI
333 5099 1 0 M2 Evaluation Design: Alignment with Evaluation Objectives
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. Faculty MonTue 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: Ann Doucette Design is essentially the structure, the recipe that is used to assess program/intervention outcomes. This course focuses on design decisions and their alignment with evaluation questions; the precision and strength of outcome evidence needed from the evaluation, the resources that are available for the evaluation; as well as practical considerations in conducting the evaluation study. Design choice speaks to validity –the evaluator’s ability to draw conclusions in terms of the cause and effect or association between the program/intervention and outcomes (internal validity), and to generalize likely outcomes to broader samples/populations (external validity). As Cook and Campbell (1979) assert, there is no single best design approach. Designs are grouped into three primary categories – experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental, with a range of choices within each category. Traditionally, experimental designs have been characterized as the “gold standard,” a decidedly biased representation, as the best. While experimental designs continue to be characterized as the gold standard, they are not automatically appropriate for all evaluations. Design choice should be informed by the evaluation questions to be addressed, and the precision needed in outcome estimates (evidence), along with the practical considerations of implementing the design. Design choices, whether experimental, quasi-experimental or non-experimental, have limitations and practical considerations in terms of their use in evaluation studies. The course covers the design categories noted above, highlights advantages and disadvantages of each, and identifies when best to use specific design approaches, as well as building a rationale for selecting a particular design approach. International and domestic case examples will be used throughout the course.

TEI
336 5092 1 0 M2 Artificial Intelligence for Equity and Justice in Evaluation: Bridging Technology and Practice
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. Faculty MonTueWed 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: Jennifer P. Villalobos Navigating the intersection of artificial intelligence (AI) and evaluation practice presents unique challenges and opportunities, especially when focusing on equity and social justice. This course aims to demystify AI by demonstrating that emerging technological tools can be strategically leveraged to enhance the assessment of programs aimed at social betterment, ensuring that evaluations are methodologically sound and ethically aligned with principles of equity and justice. Participants will be introduced to various AI methodologies and their applications to assist in everything from literature searches and evaluation design to data analyses and reporting. The course will critically examine the use of AI in evaluation settings, emphasizing the importance of culturally responsive and equity-focused approaches. We will explore both the potential and the pitfalls of overreliance on AI and address the complexity of its use in dynamic and diverse contexts. Related topics such as social justice practice standards, culturally responsive practices, data integrity, algorithmic bias, and the interpretation of AI-generated data will be discussed.

TEI
337 5106 1 0 M2 Applying Appreciative Inquiry and Positive Psychology to Improve Your Evaluation Practice
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Stewart Donaldson, . Faculty ThuFri 7:00AM -
2:00PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. Instructor: Tessie Catsambas Strategic planning is becoming a common practice for governments, nonprofit organizations, businesses, and collaborations. The severe stresses facing these entities make strategic planning more important and necessary than ever. For strategic planning to be really effective it should include systematic learning informed by evaluation. If that happens, the chances of mission fulfillment and long-term organizational survival are also enhanced. In other words, thinking, acting, and learning strategically and evaluatively are necessary complements. This course examines the theory and practice of strategic planning and management with an emphasis on practical approaches to identifying and effectively addressing organizational challenges – and doing so in a way that makes systematic learning and evaluation possible. The approach engages evaluators much earlier in the process of organizational and programmatic design and change than is usual. The following topics are covered: -Understanding why strategic planning has become so important -Understanding what strategic planning is – and is not -Gaining knowledge of the range of different strategic planning approaches Understanding the Strategy Change Cycle -Gaining experience with key strategic planning tools and techniques, including stakeholder analysis, SWOT analyses, and causal mapping for purposes of understanding issues, developing strategies, and conducting evaluations -Knowing how to appropriately design formative, summative, and developmental evaluations of strategic planning processes, missions, strategies, and organizational performance

TNDY
315 5054 1 2 M1 Principles of Project Management for a Complex World
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Matthew Muga Tue 4:00PM -
6:00PM
Online Class Session Hybrid Intensive In-Person Workshops: Friday, 05/17 9:00 - 12:00PM; 1:00 - 4:00 In-Person Saturday, 05/18 9:00 - 12:00PM; 1:00 - 4:00 In-Person Online Weekly Class Sessions: Tuesday, 05/21 4:00 - 06:00PM Online Tuesday, 05/28 4:00 - 06:00PM Online Tuesday, 06/04 4:00 - 06:00PM Online Tuesday, 06/11 4:00 - 06:00PM Online Tuesday, 06/18 4:00 - 06:00PM Online Our world continues to evolve, becoming more and more complex each day. With that growing complexity comes numerous challenges especially for those working to enact positive change through project-based activities whether it be in industry, our communities, governments, or academia. However, numerous studies have shown that projects seldom get delivered on time, within budget, and delivering its scope and that is especially seen with projects dealing with incredibly complex or “wicked problems”. Understanding how to approach, plan, and execute projects that focus on driving change within highly complex systems requires a more holistic and transdisciplinary view of Project Management. In this course we will be exploring project management for highly complex issues. We’ll explore different styles and methods to lead projects taking a transdisciplinary approach, test and utilize popular IT project management tools. We’ll deep dive into project management and continuous improvement areas such as Scrum, Waterfall, Lean, and Six Sigma to review how these methodologies and frameworks can produce amazing outcomes on complex efforts. We’ll also explore critical elements of project management such as budgeting, communications, negotiations, risk mitigation and more.

TNDY
365 5055 1 2 M2 Global Leadership
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Kristine Kawamura Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Online Class Session Online Requires International Travel to Vietnam. Students are responsible for travel arrangements to and from Vietnam. Standard CGU tuition and fees in addition to a course fee ($3,500 - $4,010) to cover accommodations, site visits, and other incidentals. For more information, please contact Mary Jo Carzoo (Maryjo.Carzoo@cgu.edu), Drucker School of Management. Online Synchronous Session (pre-trip): Tuesday, July 2, 2024, 7:00 to 9:50PM (pacific) International Travel Dates (Vietnam): Sunday, July 21st through Saturday, July 27th, 2024 Online Synchronous Session (post-trip): Tuesday, August 13, 2024, This is an experiential class that includes global travel, experiential learning, and leadership transformation. Global travel is life-changing. As we uproot ourselves from the familiar, we are able to see not only ourselves but also others "whole against the sky" (Rumi). Experiential learning provides internalized growth through deep-seated reflection and active engagement with environments and people. Leadership transformation gives us a greater capacity to impact people and effect change as we team with people from different cultures and walks of life. To achieve success, leaders need to ask themselves the following questions: • How do we effectively lead others who are culturally different than ourselves? • How much do we really know about the world, its vast cornucopia of cultures and systems, and its shared human values and experiences? • How we can develop the cultural intelligence and cultural competence to serve as transformative leaders, community members, creatives, and change makers? The purpose of this class is three-fold: 1) to help students experience the world (in all its richness, complexity, beauty, and challenge) through global travel and experiential learning; 2) to build awareness of, and skills in, cultural awareness, cultural intelligence, and global leadership; and, 3) to actively develop as global leaders by studying, reflecting on, talking with, and building relationships with leaders and community members in different parts of the world.

TNDY
403E 5052 1 4   Working Across Cultures
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Robert Klitgaard Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. More and more, people in business, government, nonprofits, education, public health, and religious institutions find themselves working across cultures. This course addresses three broad questions. How can you prepare for the challenges of working or studying in a different cultural setting? Within your own institution in your own country, how can you take advantage of various kinds of cultural diversity? How can you tailor policies, programs, and management practices to take advantage of different cultural settings? The course draws from many disciplines and uses examples from the United States and around the world.

TNDY
405A 5056 1 4 M1 Heritage, Culture and Managing the Past in the Old World and the New
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Joshua Goode Tue 11:00AM -
1:00PM
Yuhaaviatam Center 100 In-Person Requires International Travel to England (with optional trip to Germany). Students are responsible for making travel arrangments to and from England and Germany. Standard CGU tuition and fees in addition to a course fee ($700.00 - $1000.00). Two class meetings in Los Angeles for CGU students the week of 05/27/2024: scheduled for 05/28 and 05/30, 11:00AM - 01:00PM (pacific). Site Visits: LA (06/03/24 - 06/07/24); Bath, England (06/26/24 - 07/03/24); Bayreuth, Germany (Tentative, 07/05/24 - 07/08/24). This course is a jointly taught, dual campus class that examines heritage management of historical sites and museums in both Los Angeles and the Bath region. While in Los Angeles, students from Bath and from CGU will explore important cultural heritage sites, including the Getty Villa, the Autry Museum of the American West, the Huntington Library, Watts Towers, the Margaret Herrick Library of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills, among other sites to be determined. In Bath, the students will use the university as home base to explore the city, named a World Heritage site by UNESCO in 1987, and its many museums and historical sites, including its complete Roman baths, One Royal Crescent House Museum, and the Jane Austen Center. Outside Bath, we will explore Oxford and London to talk with museum leaders and heritage management experts. Stonehenge and the Victoria and Albert Museum are already planned as part of the itinerary outside of Bath. The differences between the two locations, the Los Angeles region and Bath, will pose in very clear relief the different kinds of issues that face heritage management experts in both contexts. How do we protect and manage historical sites and collections? Where do we find funding for the arts and cultural patrimony in a complicated setting of public and increasingly private fund-raising? How do we convey and maintain the cultural significance of these sites to contemporary and future audiences? Particular focus will be placed on the structural and economic differences between the regions that define how the arts and heritage efforts are funded, and how broader, more globalized forces will define civic and national commemoration and historical education efforts in the future.

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408Y 5051 1 4 M1 Politics and Policy of Health Disparities
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Javier Rodriguez TueFri 5:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course also includes 2 hours of asynchronous content. Illness, disability, and mortality are to an important extent—both at the public and individual levels—extended biological expressions of social contexts. This is what this course is about: to develop a transdisciplinary understanding of how social phenomena gets under our skin. Importantly, the study of epidemiological outcomes is intensely transdisciplinary. This is because the functioning and dysregulation of our body systems are patterned by environmental stimuli—and political, economic, social, cultural, and psychological processes are the structural components of the environments in which we are born, live, age, work, and play. This course focuses on how our political system—i.e., the underlying historical institutional arrangement that emanates from the elected and non-elected state personnel that write, interpret, execute and enforce rules, regulations, legislation, and public and private programs—frame the social determinants of health. Our approach will be transdisciplinary because many of the forces that shape the social determinants of health happen in and are exclusive to the government—e.g., from regulating pollution and housing to work legislation, from tax cuts and taxing sugar-sweetened beverages and tobacco to schools and education, and from mass incarceration and the criminal justice system to Medicaid, Medicare, and Social Security. The proposed course emphasizes health disparities because the resulting distribution of public goods and services that stems from the political system is at the core of both triumphant and embarrassing transdisciplinary research. Still, only through transdisciplinary lenses we can develop an understanding of the power that relies in government to construct identities, belief systems, the norms that dictate human behavior, the demographic groups (e.g., age, race/ethnicity, gender) that define us as social beings and, in sum, the frameworks where our social life unfolds affecting our mental, behavioral and emotional well being and health.

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430 5050 1 4 M1 Transdisciplinary Changemakers. Justice-Centered Frameworks for Education
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Tamar O Salibian Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. There will be three hours of additional asynchronous work each week in the form of videos, group work, and assignments since the class is scheduled for Module 1 and only meets once a week for three hours. What does change mean in education? How and why is change-making a critical leadership role for every teacher? What kinds of transformations can we lead in formal and informal learning spaces? Audre Lorde famously wrote, “the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house. They may allow us temporarily to beat him at his own game, but they will never enable us to bring about genuine change.” Genuine changemaking as transdisciplinary action is about transgression, transcendence, and transformation and is motivated by goals of justice and positive futures. In addressing the wicked problem of education, we explore a centuries old system designed to self-replicate and perpetuate oppression and inequities for a diversity of learners, and woefully misaligned with learning science and current and emerging education contexts. We embrace a strong mission to create equity-minded principles and strategies for authentic, meaningful, and deep learning experiences that prepare all learners to flourish in an emerging and unpredictable world. As part of developing a transdisciplinary pedagogy of transformation, we will synthesize learning sciences with the arts, and systems, complexity, design thinking, and reflexivity lenses to explore current and future-possible landscapes of education and work creatively to find and develop tools for transformation. We undertake this journal in a transdisciplinary collaboration that invites you to bring your disciplinary perspectives and questions, lived experiences, and your values and purpose as an educator. In this integration, you will connect?the outer life of scholarship and teaching with your inner life of values, beliefs, and purpose to create an explicit and living philosophy and methods that will keep evolving with your practice. In learning about education as a transformative process for justice, you have an opportunity to be transformed in turn as an educator and leader.

WGS
304 5029 1 4 M1 Feminist Research Methods and Inquiry
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Dionne Bensonsmith TueThu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. An examination feminist methods and theoretical approaches to research and analysis.? Participants will focus on debates within and about feminist methodology, for example, feminist theorizing of experience, feminist and women of color epistemologies, and situated knowledge.? Participants will explore theorizing across disciplines and cultural contexts, focusing on both methodology (theories of the research process) and epistemology (theories of knowledge).? We will survey a range of feminist research methods and their applications across disciplines and areas, and address contemporary methodologies employed by scholars doing research in?and?with communities of color and/or marginalized communities. Topics may include trauma-informed research methods, storywork and narrative methods, decolonial, intersectional, queer, and critical race methodologies.

WRITING
350 5026 1 0 - 4   Dissertation and Thesis Writing
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Anisha Ahuja Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Session Online This course is for students in the thesis, dissertation proposal, or dissertation phases of their degrees. All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is designed with a two-fold purpose: to cover major topics on the writing process and structures related to theses and dissertations, and to provide structured writing time, accountability, and feedback. Adapting the format of the Center for Writing & Rhetoric's dissertation boot camps into a course, each week will include an examination of a relevant writing topic as well as dedicated writing time. The course aims to increase writer productivity by developing individualized writing plans and habits in conjunction with community-based, structured writing time and instruction on applicable writing topics. Students must be in the writing phase for a thesis, dissertation proposal, or dissertation to take the course. Please contact the instructor with any questions.

WRITING
350 5089 2 0 - 4   Dissertation and Thesis Writing
TextbookTextbook
Katrina Denman Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Online Class Session Online All instructional time occurs online as synchronous meetings, asynchronous engagement, or a combination of both. This course is designed with a two-fold purpose: to cover major topics on the writing process and structures related to theses and dissertations, and to provide structured writing time, accountability, and feedback. Adapting the format of the Center for Writing & Rhetoric's dissertation boot camps into a course, each week will include an examination of a relevant writing topic as well as dedicated writing time. The course aims to increase writer productivity by developing individualized writing plans and habits in conjunction with community-based, structured writing time and instruction on applicable writing topics. Students must be in the writing phase for a thesis, dissertation proposal, or dissertation to take the course. Please contact the instructor with any questions.